The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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How to solve Poisson equation in electrodynamics?

I learned electrodynamics. According to the vector potential determination, $$ \mathbf B = [\nabla \times \mathbf A ], $$ Coulomb gauge, $$ \nabla \mathbf A = 0, $$ and one of Maxwell's equations, $$ ...
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4answers
175 views

physics , magnetic lines of a magnetic

Why magnetic lines comes from north to south out side of the magnet is any magnetic lines comes from south to north if so in which direction What is the reason of magnetic lineS
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1answer
256 views

Hairy ball theorem: references to applications

I'm looking for references to applications of the Hairy ball theorem. This is a result of mathematics (topology), but I am interested in applications. I already visited wikipedia and cited ...
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0answers
75 views

How to apply Guass Law to Voltages

So, I know $\oint E\centerdot dA = 4\pi Q_{enc}$ I'm trying to solve for a TEM mode with two concentric (infinite) cylindrical wave guides of radius a and b, $a<b$. I know that for TEM modes, I ...
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1answer
545 views

Does a magnetic field induce an emf in a loop of wire

Is it true that any magnetic field induces an emf in a loop of wire? If It it is true then kindly explain me with an example
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3answers
165 views

How is extra information encoded in digital radio?

Earlier today, I was listening to my digital radio, and was intrigued as to how they are able to encode the information displayed on the LCD screen (which was basically a short string of text giving a ...
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3answers
11k views

How can I theoretically describe the potential between two capacitors in series?

Suppose to have two capacitors in series: The voltage in the middle point will be: $$ V_X = V_1 \frac{C_1}{C_1+C_2} $$ How can this be explained? It's been asked in electronics, and explained in ...
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2answers
2k views

Make a semi transparent mirror with copper

The question: How would you make a semi transparent mirror (50% reflection, 50% transmission) with glass with a layer of copper. For light $\lambda$ = 500nm Try to be as realistic as possible What ...
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2answers
223 views

Applying $\nabla\times\mathbf{B} = \mu_0\mathbf{J}$ in the presence of magnetic shielding

2012-06-13 - Revised question in experimental format (This is a thought experiment for which RF experts may have an immediate answer.) I'll assume (I could be wrong) the possibility of creating a ...
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1answer
358 views

Why does magnetic field lines go from plus to minus?

My question is why the magnetic field lines goes from plus to minus, if there was two charge. Is it true or isn't it true.
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0answers
371 views

Modeling a bar magnet's magnetic flux inside a coil

A bar magnet and a coil arranged alongside their common axis is a common setting in teaching. But how does the magnetic flux H(x) (where x is the distance of the bar magnet's center relative to the ...
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2answers
144 views

Do magnetic field shift away from the coil that generates it?

I read about magnetic induction communication on Lockheed Martin's wireless mining communication system In this interview Warren Gross said: We generate a signal and send it through a loop that's ...
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2answers
202 views

Effect of Charged Particles trapped in Magnetic Field on that Field

Given a stream of moving charged particles that encounter a uniform magnetic field such that they are trapped in a circular orbit, what effect do these particles have on the net magnetic field over ...
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1answer
1k views

How positively charged protons remain glued to each other while they should repel each other out of nucleus? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Protons' repulsion within a nucleus How positively charged protons remain glued to each other while they should repel each other out of nucleus?
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2answers
270 views

Understanding Dynamic light scattering

I'd like to understand the physics of dynamic light scattering experiment. In particular I want to understand the basic relation between relaxation time $\tau_q$ and the diffusion coefficient $D$: ...
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1answer
72 views

Weather Radar Interpretation - Radial Rays

I was browsing the NEXRAD radar feeds (I'm not an expert, just figuring them out) and I came across the following signature (visit the link to view the radar image) http://cl.ly/3n0y0p0g2M0K2B313g3U ...
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1answer
65 views

What kind of light is needed to light up Venus?

Let's say I would want to light up Venus, such that we can see Venus all day long and not have to wait for a Venus Transit. What kind of light would I need for it? How powerful would it need to be?
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1answer
334 views

Loop of wire in a varying magnetic field

Let us suppose we have a loop of wire with some definite resistance in a magnetic field. Let the magnetic field be varying. This varying magnetic field will st up an EMF in the wire. My questions are ...
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1answer
2k views

Which are other anomalies like Divergence of 1/r^2?

As one might have learned in the basic science (ex. Electrodynamic theory), when we apply the divergence theorem to the vector function like 1/r^2 with it pointing in the radial direction (like ...
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0answers
212 views

Semiclassical QED and long-range interaction

I'm interested in the (very) low energy limit of quantum electrodynamics. I've seen that taking this limit does not yield Maxwell equations, but a quantum corrected non-linear version of them. If ...
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1answer
473 views

How to transfer energy from a generator to a storeage battery

and thank you in advance for taking the time to read my question. To give an idea of my working level, I'm a 21 year old computer science student entering my senior year at college. It's been a few ...
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2answers
1k views

How is antenna gain correlated to beam width?

Let's say you have two dipole type antennas. Antenna A has a gain of 2.15 dBi, a horizontal beam width of 360 deg and a vertical beam width of 45 deg. Antenna B is similar to antenna A, but has a ...
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1answer
122 views

Circumference of a Magnetic Field

Is it possible that a metallic object will not be under the influence of a magnetic field at a certain closeness to a conductor, but will then experience the effect on moving to a particular distance ...
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2answers
611 views

How does Earth's interior dynamo work?

I'm interested in getting a basic physical understanding of how Earth's magnetic field is generated. I understand that it's a "dynamo" type of effect, driven by convection currents in the molten outer ...
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1answer
896 views

Improvement Of Soft Iron And Steel As Magnets

I am given to know that soft iron is used as temporary electromagnet since it has high permeability i.e. the ability to align its domains corresponding to the electric field around it, however has a ...
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1answer
240 views

Can a charged black hole interact via electromagnetism? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Detection of the Electric Charge of a Black Hole Light cannot escape from a black hole. However light is also interpreted as the carrier of the electromagnetic force. So ...
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8answers
4k views

Is there an intuitive explanation for why Lorentz force is perpendicular to a particle's velocity and the magnetic field?

The Lorentz force on a charged particle is perpendicular to the particle's velocity and the magnetic field it's moving through. This is obvious from the equation: $$ \mathbf{F} = q\mathbf{v} \times ...
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2answers
33k views

Has any permanent magnet motor been proven to run?

I have read lots of articles about permanent magnet motors, some of which claim the possibility and other which refute it. Is it possible to have a permanent magnet motor that runs on the magnetic ...
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7answers
5k views

Cyclist's electrical tingling under power lines

It's been happening to me for years. I finally decided to ask users who are better with "practical physics" when I was told that my experience – that I am going to describe momentarily – prove that I ...
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1answer
724 views

Work done on charged particle by magnetic field in quantum mechanics

Classically, we know from $\mathbf{F}=q\mathbf{v}\times \mathbf{B}$ that magnetic field does no work on a charged particle. In quantum mechanics, the Hamiltonian of a charged particle in a magnetic ...
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1answer
130 views

Crushing a magnetic field

What would happen if you crushed a magnetic field to an ever decreasing size? Thanks. EDIT: How small could the field possibly go? Is there a limit on how small it could get? Is there a maximum ...
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1answer
351 views

Gravimagnetic monopole and General relativity

Review and hystorical background: Gravitomagnetism (GM), refers to a set of formal analogies between Maxwell's field equations and an approximation, valid under certain conditions, to the Einstein ...
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1answer
434 views

Strength of Magnetic Field Around a Superconductor

I recently learned that the strength of a Magnetic field around a conductor is proportional to the current flowing in it. So if we have a Mercury wire at absolute zero and pass a current through it ...
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1answer
120 views

What is the reason behind the shape of the absorption curve of electron paramagnetic resonance

In our EPR experiment, the signal looks like the "first derivative" part of the above picture. Why is this? What does the "first derivative" mean and why is it the quantity our instruments detect in ...
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3answers
3k views

Coulomb's Law: why is $k = \dfrac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}$ [duplicate]

This was supposed to be a long question but something went wrong and everything I typed was lost. Here goes. Why is $k = \dfrac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}$ in Coulomb's law? Is this an experimental fact? ...
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3answers
2k views

Is the electric field zero inside an ideal conductor carrying a current?

By an ideal conductor, I mean one with zero resistance. Inside an ideal conductor with no current, the electric field is zero, but is the electric field still zero with the ideal conductor carrying a ...
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2answers
354 views

A Question From Jackson Electrodynamics

I have a question regarding Jackson's Classical Electrodynamics. Consider the equation $$\varphi \left ( x\right )=\tfrac{1}{4\pi\epsilon _{0}} \int_V \frac{\varrho ( x )}{R}d^{3}x+\tfrac{1}{4\pi} ...
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2answers
3k views

Coulomb potential in 2D

I know that the Coulomb potential is logarithmic is two dimensions, and that (see for instance this paper: http://pil.phys.uniroma1.it/~satlongrange/abstracts/samaj.pdf) a length scale naturally ...
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3answers
868 views

Trouble with the Lorentz law of force: Incompatibility with special relativity and momentum conservation?

In Physical Review Letters, there was a paper recently published: Masud Mansuripur, Trouble with the Lorentz Law of Force: Incompatibility with Special Relativity and Momentum Conservation, Phys. ...
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1answer
343 views

Impervious nature of solid matter due to quantum degeneracy pressure

On Wikipedia the following statement is made without reference: Freeman Dyson showed that the imperviousness of solid matter is due to quantum degeneracy pressure rather than electrostatic ...
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1answer
178 views

Is a low-current electrical arc harmful to humans?

I've heard that electrical flux non-destructive particle testing machines are considered safe because they use less than 2 amps. I have seen an arc created between two objects do considerable damage, ...
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2answers
663 views

Could a solar flare cause the Earth's magnetic poles to reverse?

With all the hype of the impending "2012 Mayan doomsday" I was thinking it might be interesting to see what principles of physics prevent the theories of doomsday from occurring. One overarching ...
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2answers
246 views

When work is performed solely by magnetism, is there an equivalent loss of energy from the magnetic field?

When two magnets are placed within appropriate proximity and released, the attractive force will perform work and bring them together. Work is performed overcoming friction. Can we measure a ...
4
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1answer
549 views

Dirac's quantization rule

I first recall the Dirac's quantization rule, derived under the hypothesis that there would exit somewhere a magnetic charge: $\frac{gq}{4\pi} = \frac{n\hbar}{2} $ with $n$ natural. I am wondering ...
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4answers
990 views

How to interpret the continuity conditions in the PDEs (for example, Maxwell equations) originated in physics?

I am currently working on PDEs in physics, mostly Maxwell equations. I am a mathematics graduate student, and this question has been haunting me for years. In PDE theory, or more specifically the ...
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5answers
16k views

Phase shift of 180 degrees on reflection from optically denser medium

Can anyone please provide an intuitive explanation of why phase shift of 180 degrees occurs in the Electric Field of a EM wave,when reflected from an optically denser medium? I tried searching for it ...
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2answers
9k views

How do I relate the direction of a compass needle to the direction of a current?

A compass needle is placed above the wire points with its N-pole toward the east. In what direction is the current flowing? If a compass is put underneath the wire, in which direction will ...
2
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2answers
246 views

Interaction speed between electric charges and magnetic materials

Einstein said that the speed of a matter in universe cannot exceed the speed of light. Is it correct for electric force transmission speed from one electric charge to other one? What is ...
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1answer
983 views

Magnetic Permeability & Reluctance on old exam question

This is a past exam question from one of our lectures, and we have an issue with (i), I believe I need to use the equation $\rho=\frac{RA}{l}$, but I am not sure - could someone enlighten me on the ...
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1answer
468 views

What is the time correlation function in the Green-Kubo formulation of ionic current?

I am reading a paper, and I came across the Green-Kubo formulation, where the conductivity $\sigma$ of charged particles is related to the time correlation function of the $z$-component of the ...