The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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304 views

Phase Accumulation of Hankel-waves upon propagation

Hankel functions are solutions to the scalar Helmholtz-equation $$\Delta\psi + k_e^2\psi = 0$$ in cylindrical and spherical geometry (with respect to a separated angular dependence). Thus, they are ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Moving conductors in magnetic fields: is there electric field or not?

this is my first question on PhysicsSE (I'm already an user of MathSE). I'm a mathematics students trying to understand Faraday's law, that is $$\varepsilon= -\frac{d \Phi_B}{dt}$$ where ...
0
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2answers
353 views

Do and can phone signals come inside AC car which is glass-packed

Can phone signals penetrate glass, so can I expect phone signals to come if I am sitting inside a closed AC car. Thanks,
2
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1answer
125 views

Effect of a external EM field on a dielectric

If an external EM field (a laser, for example) act on a dielectric (a glass, for example) what will be the effect of this field on the dielectric constant and on the refractive index of the material? ...
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2answers
403 views

A lightning protection device physics

Here is a description of the principle of the operation of a new lightning device: During a storm the ambient electric field may rise to between 10 to 20 kV/m. As soon as the field exceeds a thresold ...
2
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1answer
636 views

What gauge is used in the Lagrangian for a non-relativistic point particle in an electromagnetic potential

For the Lagrangian $$L = \frac{1}{2}mu^2 - q(\phi - \frac{\vec{A}}{c}\cdot \vec{u})$$ of a non-relativistic point particle in an electromagnetic potential, what gauge is used for the electromagnetic ...
12
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5answers
913 views

Making symmetry between E and B fields manifest in Lagrangian

Maxwell's equations are nearly symmetric between $E$ and $B$. If we add magnetic monopoles, or of course if we restrict ourselves to the sourceless case, then this symmetry is exact. This is not ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Theories that Relate Gravity, Electricity, and Magnetism [duplicate]

There are some people who (without having a stated theory that I know of) insist that Gravity, Electricity, and Magnetism are related. Some point to symmetry in Maxwell's Equations as a potential ...
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2answers
448 views

Laplace's equation

I have got some mathematical difficulties in the following exercise : Calculate the potential of the polarized sphere along the z-axis. There are no free charges. For this, we need to solve ...
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3answers
494 views

Electric field at a point being an $n^{th}$ derivative of electric (or magnetic) field at some other point

This is a theoretical question for which i would like to know an answer with an example. I'd like to know if its possible to create a setup where the electric field at a point $P$ is $n^{th}$ ...
3
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2answers
294 views

Gravitational wave energy

Electromagnetic energy can be related to it's frequency via $E=h\nu$. Is there a comparable relationship between gravitational wave energy and frequency?
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1answer
970 views

How radio waves penetrate through buildings?

For example how radio signals of a base transceiver station (BTS) penetrate through buildings?
23
votes
4answers
13k views

Why do electrons occupy the space around nuclei, and not collide with them?

We all learn in grade school that electrons are negatively-charged particles that inhabit the space around the nucleus of an atom, that protons are positively-charged and are embedded within the ...
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2answers
2k views

Why do bar magnets have least attraction in its center?

Why do bar magnets have the least attraction in its center?
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4answers
2k views

Induced EMF of a spinning metal rod [closed]

Hey everyone, I'm currently taking an Eletricity and Magnetism course and I'm having dificulty answering this problem. I've gone to my tutor, but sadly, he hasn't taken E+M for a while now and ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Lots of little questions about radiation of LC circuits

I'm trying to get a more intuitive understanding of resonant inductive coupling. It's supposed be a more efficient way to transfer electrical energy wirelessly, because the coils are only coupled by ...
1
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2answers
274 views

What effect would liquid air have on a resonant coil?

This description of Tesla's "magnifying transmitter", which supposedly used electrical resonance to transmit energy (similar to resonant inductive coupling?) states that the coils (or at least part of ...
7
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2answers
388 views

Radiation Resistance

When a charge is accelerated, it radiates and loses kinetic energy. This can be modeled by having another force act on the charge, which is proportional to the derivative of the acceleration. So if ...
0
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2answers
1k views

Can quantum communication really replace electromagnetic waves for telecommunication medium in future?

Currently I am planning to get masters degree. So I am thinking about a subject in which I have to get masters degree. Following are my questions to leading physicists.. Which technology is the ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Energy conservation in Electrodynamics

Let us suppose that we have a known electromagnetic wave-train of finite size propagating in a certain direction. There is a probe charge on its way. This EMW is an external field for the charge. The ...
2
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2answers
1k views

How to estimate inductive coupling between distant air coils

I have two air coils (assume they are simple, circular wire loops). They both have diameter d. There is a distance D between their centres. D is much greater than d (more than 10x greater) Both ...
2
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2answers
236 views

Need some help interpreting a formula inspired from Coulomb's law

It has been more than a decade since I did all vector related math and physics so pardon me if my question does not make sense. I am reading some article that says it was inspired from Coulomb's law ...
4
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1answer
691 views

How can I model buckyballs sticking together? (Tiny spherical magnets)

Buckyballs are a desktoy that consist of 216 tiny spherical magnets. You can makes all kinds of interesting shapes and structures out of them (do a Google search). I want to model them in a physics ...
4
votes
1answer
825 views

What is the direction of the induced E field from a changing uniform magnetic field?

If a stationary charge is placed in a changing uniform magnetic field to measure the induced E field at some point, what would be the direction of E? I think E must equal zero normal to B to maintain ...
7
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4answers
3k views

Measuring the spin of a single electron

Is it possible to measure the spin of a single electron? What papers have been published on answering this question? Would the measurement require a super sensitive SQUID, Superconductive Quantum ...
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4answers
492 views

Are electromagnetic “plane” waves measurable or just a virtual concept?

I find plane waves are uncompatible with light cone. Perhaps plane waves are "virtual" and can never be measured in that case, shouldn't we call plane waves as "virtual plane waves"? (other option ...
3
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0answers
381 views

I lost a factor of two in the electromagnetic field tensor

I apologize for this simple question, but I lost a factor of 2 and can't find it anymore, so now I'm looking on the internet, perhaps one of you has some information about its whereabouts. :-) ...
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3answers
10k views

Do magnets lose their magnetism?

I recently bought some buckyballs, considered to be the world's best selling desk toy. Essentially, they are little, spherical magnets that can form interesting shapes when a bunch of them are used ...
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4answers
2k views

How do electrons “know” to share their voltage between two resistors?

My physics teacher explained the difference between voltage and current using sandwiches. Each person gets a bag full of sandwiches when they pass through the battery. Current = the number of people ...
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1answer
389 views

What direction does the force vector point in regards to Earth's E and B fields?

In regards to the right hand rule, given Earth's electric and magnetic field, in which "direction" would a particle go?
5
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1answer
208 views

Is it true that the angular momentum of electromagnetic waves in an anisotropic medium is an integral of motion?

Extending my previous question Angular moment and EM wave, does it make sense to talk about the angular momentum of electromagnetic waves in an anisotropic medium? It is not obvious that the angular ...
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3answers
2k views

Direction of Magnetic force from a current running through a coil of wire

What is the direction is the magnetic force vectors pointing from a coil of wire that has current running through it? ...
8
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5answers
636 views

How would I go about detecting monopoles?

A question needed for a "solid" sci-fi author: How to detect a strong magnetic monopole? (yes, I know no such thing is to be found on Earth). Think of basic construction details, principles of ...
7
votes
1answer
365 views

Magnetic susceptibility in 1/eV

In this paper the authors refer to transverse susceptibility $\chi_{ \perp}$ [meV $^{−1}$] I was taught that the magnetic susceptibility is dimensionless. How do I get $\chi$ in the above ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Cancel the Earth's magnetic field

Is there any reason why Earth's magnetic poles are so close to its axis of rotation, or is it a coincidence? Why does the Earth have a somewhat uniform magnetic field with two poles? If you take a ...
11
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1answer
4k views

If a credit card won't read when swiped, does wrapping it in plastic actually help and if so, why?

I've on occasion seen when a cashier has trouble getting a credit card to read, will wrap it in a thin plastic grocery bag, and try swiping it again. Much to my surprise, it seemed to work. Since the ...
3
votes
1answer
254 views

PNMR, Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Experiment

I am writing a lab report for class on PNMR experiment that we did. How come in this experiment we don't worry about the electron spins in our sample? Aren't the electrons affected by the PNMR machine ...
5
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2answers
133 views

Can D and H form an 'in materials' version of the electromagnetic tensor?

In analogy to the electromagnetic tensor, with the components defined as the electric field $E$ and magnetic field $B$ as such: $F^{ab} = \begin{bmatrix} 0 & -E_x/c & -E_y/c & -E_z/c \\ ...
3
votes
2answers
144 views

Why is there independent motion of Earth's magnetic poles?

Earth's N and S magnetic poles "wander independently of each other and are not at exactly opposite positions on the globe" [from WIKI's "Earth's magnetic field"]. Can these independent motions be ...
5
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1answer
674 views

Energy in magnetic fields

If I calculate the energy contained in the electric field for an electric dipole p in an electric field E, I get (ignoring the terms independent of orientation): $U = - \vec{p} \cdot \vec{E}$ which ...
13
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5answers
2k views

How can there be net linear momentum in a static electromagnetic field (not propagating)?

I understand from basic conservation of energy and momentum considerations, it is clear in classical electrodynamics that the fields should be able to have energy and momentum. This leads to the usual ...
14
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4answers
2k views

History of Electromagnetic Field Tensor

I'm curious to learn how people discovered that electric and magnetic fields could be nicely put into one simple tensor. It's clear that the tensor provides many beautiful simplifications to the ...
5
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4answers
2k views

Recovering energy from a modern, magnetic-levitated flywheel

A modern flywheel rotor is suspended in a vacuum by magnetic bearings. This means that nothing touches the rotor as it spins. When time comes that we need to recover that stored kinetic energy, how do ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Relativistic charged particles in a constant uniform magnetic field

How can i derive the dynamic of a relativistic charged particle in a uniform magnetic field $B=(0,0,B)$?
5
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1answer
758 views

Angular momentum and EM wave

Is there any sense in saying that circularly polarized EM waves have angular momentum?
14
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7answers
5k views

What is the electric field generated by a spinning magnet?

Consider a cylinder of permanently magnetized material, with uniform magnetization pointing along the cylindrical symmetry axis (the $z$-direction). The magnet is rotating about its cylindrical ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Which metals can cause magnetic interference (passively)?

I am developing an application that uses the magnetometer inside smart-phones to detect orientation w.r.t. the Earth's magnetic field. I have noticed that when the phone is held close to a metal ...
6
votes
2answers
454 views

What's a good reference for the electrodynamics of moving media?

The answer to a previous question suggests that a moving, permanently magnetized material has an effective electric polarization $\vec{v}\times\vec{M}$. This is easy to check in the case of ...
6
votes
2answers
555 views

Calculate the electric field of a moving infinite magnet, without boosting

Consider a rectangular slab of permanently magnetized material. The slab's dimensions are $L_x$, $L_y$, and $L_z$, and the slab is uniformly magnetized in the $\hat{x}$-direction. The slab is not ...
4
votes
1answer
580 views

Electric Potential

A nonuniform linear charge distribution given by $\lambda = bx$, where $b$ is a constant, is located along an $x$ axis from $x = 0$ to $x = L$. What is the electric potential at a point on the $y$ ...