The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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184 views

How to properly construct the electromagnetic tensor in curved space-time?

How do I properly construct the electromagnetic tensor in curved space-time? I have my curved spacetime metric $(+,-,-,-)$ and my magnetic vector potential $A$. I tried two ways but not sure which is ...
2
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1answer
334 views

why is advanced radiation absent?

the Lienard-Wiechert green functions have future and past null cones of radiation. Maxwell equations allow for a continuous range of mixtures between the retarded and advanced components, but we have ...
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3answers
294 views

Protons and Electrons Occupying the Same Space

When it comes to atoms electrons can't fall into the nucleus, which besides the off hand uncertainty explanation, I'm not sure which force prevents them from falling into the nucleus. I thought I ...
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2answers
3k views

Derivation of the Biot-Savart Law [duplicate]

Can someone provide a derivation of the Biot-Savart law for electromagnetic induction? To be clear, $$ d\vec{B}~=~\frac{\mu_0}{4\pi}\frac{I d\vec{\ell}\times \vec{r}}{r^3}. $$ Is there a simple way ...
13
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1answer
1k views

Equation describing magnetic hysteresis

So when you're looking at B-H curves for ferromagnetic substances, you often see these magnetic hysteresis curves, which occur, I gather, largely because of domain formation which has some reversible ...
11
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4answers
3k views

How long does a permanent magnet remain a magnet?

I have a bunch of magnets (one of those game-board thingies) given to me when I was a school-going lad over 20 years ago, and the magnets feel just as strong as it was the day it was given. As a ...
9
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2answers
329 views

Motivation for Potentials

This is a hypothetical question about "pedagogy". Let's say I am trying to take someone who has just a very small amount of knowledge about Newtonian mechanics and convince them that the Lagrangian ...
8
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1answer
1k views

How do I derive the Lorenz gauge from the continuity equation?

I was reading my old electromagnetics book (Elements of Electromagnetics, by Sadiku, 3rd edition) and after the author explained what the Lorenz gauge is mathematically and why it is useful in ...
8
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1answer
363 views

Magnets arranged in a sphere

If I was to take a bunch of magnets and arrange them in a sphere (And keep them there with glue or plastic or something) so that the north pole faces the outside of the sphere and the south pole faces ...
7
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1answer
277 views

Maxwell's Equations in curved spacetime

I know that we can write Maxwell's equations in the covariant form, and this covariant form can be considered as a generalization of these equations in curved spacetime if we replace ordinary ...
7
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4answers
2k views

Does a material exist that reduces a magnetic field without being affected by the magnetic field itself?

Consider a common bar magnet, magnet 1 resting on a surface with its North pole facing up. Suspended distance $y$ above it ...
6
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4answers
277 views

Is the concept of a field necessary to electrodynamics?

I've read (in Griffith's text) that it is "possible, though cumbersome" to dispense with the field concept in electrodynamics entirely and instead use an action-at-a-distance theory. What exactly is ...
6
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3answers
3k views

Faraday's law - does the induced current's magnetic field affect the change in flux?

I've had this conceptual problem with Faraday's law and inductance for a while now. Take the example of a simple current loop with increasing area in a constant field (as in this answer). So ...
6
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3answers
644 views

Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Flux Quantization in superconductors

Why is the magnetic flux not quantized in a standard Aharonov-Bohm (infinite) solenoid setup, whereas in a superconductor setting, flux is quantized?
6
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5answers
20k views

Why a glass rod when rubbed with silk cloth aquire positive charge and not negative charge?

I have read many times in the topic of induction that a glass rod when rubbed against a silk cloth acquires a positive charge. Why does it acquire positive charge only, why not negative charge? It ...
6
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3answers
415 views

Charging a black hole?

What would happen if we have a black hole and we start shooting at it a single electron at a time, and go on doing it forever? Would the electrons start to bounce off eventually?
6
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4answers
2k views

Does magnetic propagation follow the speed of light?

Does magnetic propagation follow the speed of light? E.g. if you had some magnet of incredible strength and attached an iron wire that is one light year long to it, would the other end of the iron ...
5
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4answers
427 views

How does the speed of electrons change around a circuit?

I have been thinking about ways of teaching electronics and I'm wondering if the following is true... For starters, when we talk about voltage as energy per unit charge, is this energy manifest ...
5
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2answers
466 views

How does Earth's interior dynamo work?

I'm interested in getting a basic physical understanding of how Earth's magnetic field is generated. I understand that it's a "dynamo" type of effect, driven by convection currents in the molten outer ...
4
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2answers
93 views

Top angular speed of electric motor

I recently came across a question asking the following: If a motor is switched on, it quickly reaches a top speed. Why does it not just go faster and faster and faster? I thought it might be ...
4
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1answer
150 views

Experiments looking for monopoles

Background: (skip it if you know it) In the easiest formulation of classical electromagnetism magnetic monopoles do not exist. In fact, the Maxwell's equation $\nabla \cdot \vec{B}=0$ implies (using ...
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5answers
5k views

Does a current carrying wire produce electric field outside?

In the modern texts of electromagnetism in the presence of stationary currents the electric field is assumed conservative $\nabla \times E =0 $. Using this we get $E_{||}^{out}=E_{||}^{in}$ which ...
4
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1answer
806 views

Will molten iron stick to a magnet?

I've known for a long time that if you heat a magnet, there is a point it loses its magnetism (the Curie temperature). It isn't clear to me if this applies to induced magnetism like iron sticking to ...
4
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1answer
404 views

Does light induce an electric current in a conductor?

I know that electromagnetic waves induce electric currents in conductors and that's the basis for radio, wi-fi etc. I also know that light is also an electromagnetic wave. So, can light induce a ...
4
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1answer
202 views

Stability of a rotating ring of multiple electrons at relativistic speeds

There was a time when physicists where concerned about electron internal structure. The rotating ring model was one of the proposals to explain how a charge density could become stable against ...
4
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1answer
393 views

Dirac's quantization rule

I first recall the Dirac's quantization rule, derived under the hypothesis that there would exit somewhere a magnetic charge: $\frac{gq}{4\pi} = \frac{n\hbar}{2} $ with $n$ natural. I am wondering ...
4
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2answers
620 views

Does a nonzero Poynting vector mean that there is propagation of energy?

I don't know how this "paradox" can be solved. I'm given the following system: A permanent magnet with a magnetic field given by ($\hat{a}$ are unit vectors in the x and y directions) ...
4
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2answers
2k views

How can a conductor be grounded yet there are induced charges on it?

A classic example for the method of images is the following, quoted from Griffiths's Introduction to Electrodynamics, page 121: "Suppose a point charge $q$ is held a distance $d$ above an infinite ...
3
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1answer
284 views

How to introduce the electromagnetic field in Quantum Field Theory?

There are many ways to introduce the electromagnrtic field in Quantum Field Theory(QFT), such as canonical quantization method which introduces the creation and annihilation oprators by treating the ...
3
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1answer
878 views

Fermi level alignment and electrochemical potential between two metals

I'm trying to get a more intuitive/physical grasp of the Fermi level, like I have of electric potential. I know that, for just a single piece of metal in equilibrium, you have to have the electric ...
3
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0answers
202 views

Finding the terminal velocity of a magnet dropped in a solenoid

We have to find proportionality of the terminal velocity with the factors of the system: Plot: a small dipole(mass $m$) with dipole moment $\mu$ is dropped in a long solenoid (radius $r$, ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Electric field and electric potential of a point charge in 2D and 1D

in 3D, electric field of a piont charge is inversely proportional to the square of distance while the potential is inversely proportional to distance. We can derive it from Coulomb's law. however, I ...
3
votes
2answers
633 views

Frequency and wavelength of photons

I try to better understand how electromagnetic radiation works. So I have some questions. If an antenna emits at 100MHz (the charges on the antenna oscillate at 100MHz) what frequency will have the ...
3
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2answers
970 views

Energy in an EM wave should depend on frequency

I just finished reading Feynman's Lectures on Physics vol.I, §34-9: "The momentum of light". The author explains that there is a relation between the wave 4-vector $k^{\mu}$ and the energy-momentum ...
3
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5answers
927 views

What is the origin of the Dirac delta term in the dipole electric field?

I am a bit lost how one has deduced the formula for electric field with electric dipole because of some inconsistency between different sources. The Wikipedia article contains a delta function in the ...
3
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1answer
128 views

3 current loops with non-conservation of momentum, when one specifically considers SIGNs

Thought experiment I. Consider two loops of wire, 2 small dipoles B and C , with a common axis z (facing each other) and (say) 30 cm apart B to C. At the speed of light, information (including a ...
2
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2answers
99 views

Aharonov-Bohm Effect electricity generation

This question is based on highly intuitive picture of the Aharonov-Bohm effect (perhaps a naive one). From what I have read, the current explanation of the AB effect is that although the electron ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Force between two bar magnets

I need to know how to calculate force between two bar magnets. I searched and found an answer on Wikipedia, but I don't really trust Wikipedia, a lot of crazy stuff is posted there. So I searched ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Magnetic field strength in a solenoid

I'm pretty new to physics. I've been conducting some experiments with electromagnets. My practical results don't match up with the theory. The magnetic field in a solenoid of length $L$ around an ...
2
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2answers
148 views

What does E/M field look like when I close a circuit?

Suppose that we have a charged capacitor with two pins: $ C_+ $ and $C_-$. Suppose that we have a long wire with fixed geometry, that is already connected to the pin C+. Let the ...
2
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2answers
159 views

does a charged particle revolving around another charged particle radiate energy?

The main drawback in Rutherford's model of the atom as pointed out by Niels Bohr was that according to Maxwell's equations, a revolving charge experiences a centripetal acceleration hence it must ...
2
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1answer
357 views

Two electron beams exert different forces on each other depending on frame of reference?

I am sure there is a simple explanation for my confusion, but I am a little puzzled: We are dealing with two parallel electron cannons that each produces a straight beam of electrons. They are placed ...
2
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2answers
288 views

Do objects have energy because of their charge?

My gut feeling tells me things should have energy because of their charge, like they have energy because of their mass. Is this possible? Has it been shown? If not then what is missing to make such ...
2
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2answers
8k views

Dirichlet and Neumann Boundary condition: physical example

Can anybody tell me some practical/physical example where we use Dirichlet and Neumann Boundary condition. Is it possible to use both conditions together at the same region? If we have a cylindrical ...
2
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1answer
388 views

Electrodynamics and the Lagrangian density

Could anyone tell me what equations can I obtain from the Lagrangian density $${\cal L}(\phi,\,\,\phi_{,i},\,\,A_i, \dot A_i,\,\,A_{i,j})~=~\frac{1}{2}|\dot A+\nabla\phi|^2-\frac{1}{2}|\nabla \times ...
2
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2answers
703 views

Tensor product notation [closed]

In the image there is a tensor product: $$F_{\mu\nu}F^{\mu\nu}=2(B^2-\frac{E^2}{c^2})$$ It's about how this operation on the co- and contravariant field strength tensors can give one of the ...
2
votes
2answers
294 views

Why isn't the ISS electrically charged?

If metal moves in a magnetic field It creates a current so when the ISS or any other satellite/object charged so that if you connected a light/ put it in a circuit/ it would light up? also why doesn't ...
1
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1answer
140 views

Apparent violation of Newton's 3rd law and the conservation of angular momentum for a pair of charged particles interacting magnetically

Consider a system of the two identical point positive charges situated in the space (isolated from influence of any other external fields) as shown in the figure.Particle1 is at (a,a,0) and Particle2 ...
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1answer
104 views

Does two Neodymium magnets stick together twice the power?

Assume I use a coil to create B-flux and put ONE Neodymium cylinder magnet (1"diameter & 0.25" thick) close to the flux, it would create 10 lbs force. Does it mean that I put TWO cylinder magnets ...
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1answer
109 views

Batteries and fields?

Batteries generate fields in wires that essentially cause the movement of electrons. I think of batteries as two charged plates that essentially contain a mechanism between them to move electrons from ...