The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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942 views

Electric Dipoles and Spherical Coordinates

I've become confused over the use of spherical coordinates when working with dipole moments. It would probably be best o use an example to show where I'm confused. If we have a pure dipole, with a ...
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0answers
80 views

Electric field screening for arbitrarily formed charge

if I have a not necessarily homogenous electric field of a charge distribution in an electrolyte and i want to find out what the electric field at some position in the electrolyte is. is there any ...
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406 views

Properties of electric field

I have the following vector field: $E=E_0(-sin(\phi),cos(\phi),0)^T$ and $E_0$ is some constant. Does anybody here have an idea what this electric field does to a metallic sphere that is in it? ...
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1answer
141 views

Show that charge conservation $\partial_\mu J^\mu = 0$ implies global U(1) invariance?

The $U(1)$ global gauge symmetry of electromagnetism implies - via Noethers theorem - that electric charge is conserved. Actually, it implies a continuity equation: $$ \psi \rightarrow ...
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2answers
548 views

Energy of electron spinning in a magnetic field

When an electron travels in circles in a uniform magnetic field, it must lose energy because all accelerated charges radiate, and must therefore spiral down to the center. Is this energy compensated ...
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2answers
209 views

does a charged particle revolving around another charged particle radiate energy?

The main drawback in Rutherford's model of the atom as pointed out by Niels Bohr was that according to Maxwell's equations, a revolving charge experiences a centripetal acceleration hence it must ...
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1answer
311 views

Electrolytes and electric field

Let me assume, that I have an arbitrary electric field. Is there any way to determine what happens to this electric field if it is appolied to a charge in let me say water with natrium chloride in it? ...
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1answer
2k views

Is it possible to create artificial gravity by magnetizing iron in the blood stream?

I have been thinking is it possible that using a rather strong magnet on the human body's blood stream we could enact a small case of artificial gravity on the human body via the iron in the ...
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0answers
33 views

Two charges in a medium where different permittivity is adjacent

I was thinking about the following: Assuming that you have NON SPHERICALLY SYMMETRIC charges and they are both in medium 1. Does it make a difference(whereby I am referring to the total force) if ...
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2answers
766 views

Does a single electron moving at velocity $v$ have an associated magnetic field, ignoring intrinsic spin?

I have seen explanations of the magnetic field due to an electric current as being due to a Lorentz contraction of the moving electric charges. Would this explanation work for a single electron. There ...
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1answer
520 views

Can a force stop a Photon since Photons have momentum and What does momentum mean when talking about massless particles?

Momentum measures how hard it is to stop an object. While Photons are massless they still have relativistic mass and energy. My question is can something stop photons other than being absorbed by ...
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1answer
251 views

How to write the single electron spin-orbit coupling under an external magnetic field?

As we know, without the external magnetic field, the single electron spin-orbit coupling(SOC) has the form $\boldsymbol{\sigma}\cdot(\boldsymbol{\nabla} V\times \mathbf{p})$ up to a coefficient, ...
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1answer
984 views

Dipole moment induced in a spherical particle

Consider a spherical metal particle made out of gold. If there is an external charge somewhere near the gold particle, is there a way to calculate the resulting dipole moment that is induced by the ...
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2answers
159 views

Is it possible for a photon to be at rest? [duplicate]

I know it doesn't really make sense if looking at the photon from the wave point of view, but is there any law of physics which prohibits a photon from stopping completely? Thanks.
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3answers
2k views

Maxwells Equation from Electromagnetic Lagrangian

In Heaviside-Lorentz units the Maxwell's equations are: $$\nabla \cdot \vec{E} = \rho $$ $$ \nabla \times \vec{B} - \frac{\partial \vec{E}}{\partial t} = \vec{J}$$ $$ \nabla \times \vec{E} + ...
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0answers
75 views

What is the physical property of metal nanoparticles?

I am a Math student but now I have to deal with gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution. Now I was wondering whether the physical properties of gold nanoparticles are the same as the properties of gold ...
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3answers
347 views

Can I call additional conditions on potentials a Gauge choice?

Let's say I have an electromagnetics problem in a spatially varying medium. After I impose Maxwell's equations, the Lorenz gauge choice, boundary conditions, and the Sommerfeld radiation condition, I ...
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1answer
754 views

Two electron beams exert different forces on each other depending on frame of reference?

I am sure there is a simple explanation for my confusion, but I am a little puzzled: We are dealing with two parallel electron cannons that each produces a straight beam of electrons. They are placed ...
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1answer
176 views

Dielectric modification of electrostatic equations?

I have learnt that in cases of electrostatic fields inside a dielectric of any source charge, the field is reduced by a factor of K( if K, the dielectric "constant", is taken everywhere to be same). ...
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0answers
686 views

Transmission Line Theory: Coaxial Cable Per Unit Length Series Resistance Derivation

Brief Background A coaxial cable is an example of a transmission line. A transmission line can be analyzed by using a distributed element model in which there are a repeating set of per unit length ...
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3answers
3k views

Is there an EMF in a conductor moving at constant speed across the uniform magnetic field [duplicate]

If a conductor - a long rod - moves at constant speed across the "lines" of a uniform magnetic field, is there an EMF within this conductor? Or, if a conducting rod rotates at uniform rate, pivoted ...
3
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0answers
594 views

Is Electromagnetic Mass Possible?

If the sinusoidal electric component of a light wave were off-set to one side of the magnetic component and then the smaller "lobe" were to cancel out with much of the larger side, then where would ...
6
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1answer
6k views

Why does the refractive index depend on wavelength? [duplicate]

Why do different wavelength get impeded more or less when in different materials? Moving with the same speed, but a longer physical distance would imply that the fields oscillate less times in the ...
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2answers
316 views

Coincidence, purposeful definition, or something else in formulas for energy

In the small amount of physics that I have learned thus far, there seems to be a (possibly superficial pattern) that I have been wondering about. The formula for the kinetic energy of a moving ...
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2answers
374 views

Why do spherical waves diminish as 1/$r^2$?

Seeing the derivation of a plane wave in Giancoli, I can't understand why a spherical wave would diminish in amplitude. Shouldn't the peaks still be mutually induced, and therefore nondiminishing?
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1answer
122 views

A question about electromagnetic stress-energy tensor

This is what we know as electromagnetic stress-energy tensor $T^{\mu\nu}$. Now I want to know what is its direct relation with $\rho$, charge density? $\rho\,?=T^{\mu\nu}$, $\frac ...
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4answers
2k views

Relativity and Current in Wire

If an observer is stationary relative to a current-carrying wire in which electrons are moving, why does the observer measure the density of moving electrons to be the same as the density of electrons ...
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1answer
144 views

One terminal of an ideal voltage source connected to earth->Massive current will flow?

Assume we have a "somewhat" ideal voltage source like a DC power supply powered by mains. Take just one terminal and form a conductive path between it and earth ground. Assuming that no conductive ...
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1answer
96 views

Why Is Current $\propto$ Number of Loops?

When an additional loop is added to a generator the magnetic flux through the loops does not change yet the current increases. This seems counter-intuitive and has been described as ...
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4answers
4k views

Does a constantly accelerating charged particle emit em radiation or not?

The Abraham-Lorentz force gives the recoil force, $\mathbf{F_{rad}}$, back on a charged particle $q$ when it emits electromagnetic radiation. It is given by: $$\mathbf{F_{rad}} = \frac{q^2}{6\pi ...
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3answers
312 views

How much iron ware to make a Faraday cage

In a thunderstorm I was thinking the following: suppose I am rowing in a lake during a thunderstorm. How big a Faraday cage do I need to make to protect myself? If lightning strikes the cage, will it ...
6
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1answer
293 views

What do we mean when we say the QM wave function is a section of the $U(1)$ bundle?

I have a couple questions here. To keep the discussion simple lets stick to the following case: what is the quantum mechanics of a single particle in the presence of a background EM field, such as ...
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0answers
74 views

What can be done to increase the strength of a given electromagnet?

There's a lot of information online about increasing the strength of an electromagnet with more turns, different cores, etc, but not much about factors in the power supply that affect the strength of ...
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2answers
345 views

An Electromagnetic Paradox?

The above diagram represents an isolated system with two masses $M$, at position $X$, and $m$, at position $x$, connected together by an extended spring. Each mass is connected by rigid rods to ...
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1answer
456 views

Maxwell's equations in curved spacetime

I know that we can write Maxwell's equations in the covariant form, and this covariant form can be considered as a generalization of these equations in curved spacetime if we replace ordinary ...
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4answers
6k views

Transformer: primary side & secondary side current 180 degree out of phase

I am a novice in electrical engineering. I notice that in transformer the secondary side current & current referred to as primary are 180 degree out of phase from each other. But why it is so, I ...
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2answers
73 views

Photon propagation direction prediction possible after interacting with neutral hydrogen?

My current line of research deals a lot with hydrogen's Lyman-alpha emission and subsequent interactions of the Lyman-alpha photons with the surrounding hydrogen gas. My question is whether ...
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1answer
267 views

Does the spin precession change sign when the angular momentum does?

Say you have a charged particle moving circularly in an electromagnetic field. Basic quantum mechanics tell us that its spin will precess with a certain frequency. If the same particle were traveling ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Fermi level alignment and electrochemical potential between two metals

I'm trying to get a more intuitive/physical grasp of the Fermi level, like I have of electric potential. I know that, for just a single piece of metal in equilibrium, you have to have the electric ...
3
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1answer
797 views

Meaning of terms and interpretation in the electric multipole expansion

In section 3.4.1 of Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics, he discusses electric multipole expansion. He derives the formula or the electric potential of a dipole, which I follow, but right ...
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0answers
270 views

A correct explanation for the levitation of a superconductor above a magnet [duplicate]

I teach high school physics and I'm trying to put together a correct explanation for the levitation of a superconductor above a magnet without a high level of quantum mechanics (but consistent). I ...
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4answers
1k views

Can a magnet be tuned to attract only to one other magnet?

So think magnet X is only attracted to magnet Y , but magnet A is not attracted to either magnet Y or X. Only X and Y can attract each other???
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1answer
243 views

Help me understand eqn. 28.6 from Feynman

Feynman says that the electric field, $\bf{E}$, can be written as, $$\mathbf{E} = \frac{-q}{4 \pi \epsilon_0} [ \frac{ \mathbf{e}_{r'}}{r'^2} + \frac{r'}{c} \frac{d}{dt} (\frac{\mathbf{e}_{r'} ...
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1answer
133 views

What is the alternative of PMG (Permanent Magnet Generator) in a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine? [closed]

I need to make a report about a HAWT (Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine) and list the parts with their costs, but as a Permanent Magnet Generator is a costly thing so what can I use in alternative of this ...
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1answer
228 views

Magnetic field, alternated current and EMF

If I apply an alternated current to a solenoid and insert into it a smaller solenoid, I could measure the induced EMF (electromotive force) and study how it changes in relation to the frequency of ...
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0answers
40 views

Viscous force in a conductor

I was told that in a conductor there is a dissipative force and if Ohm's Law is valid for a component, the component has to be dissipative. I'm trying to prove it, but I have some problems. I know ...
17
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2answers
1k views

Is Newton's universal gravitational constant the inverse of permittivity of mass in vacuum?

Is it possible to consider Newton's universal gravitational constant, $G$, as inverse of vacuum permittivity of mass? $$\epsilon_m=\frac {1}{4\pi G}$$ if so, then vacuum permeability of mass will ...
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1answer
341 views

Direction of magnetic force when magnetic field and velocity are not in same plane

We know from Flaming's Right Hand Rule how to calculate the direction of the magnetic force given the magnetic field and the velocity are in the same plane. Now suppose they are not in the same plane. ...
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3answers
2k views

Does a magnet contain (and potentially produce) energy?

Very quick question, does a magnet contain energy? The general consensus seems to be, it does not. And this is generally confirmed by the fact that it would break the first law of thermodynamics. ...
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1answer
508 views

Fourier transformation, electric field and magnetic field to have a shielding lattice against particles

With Fourier-Series Expansion, we can write a function as sum of many non-repating different frequncied different amplituded sine and cosine functions. Lets assume we know electric-field and ...