The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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Induced emf in AC generator

The induced emf in a coil in AC generator is given as: $$\mathbb E = NAB\omega \sin \theta $$ $\omega = d\theta/dt$ Now, when the angle between the normal of plane and magnetic field is zero ...
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3answers
7k views

conservation of energy in Lenz's law

When we bring opposite poles of two magnets together, they attract each other (or vice versa). Now, we can say that the kinetic energy gained by the magnets is due to the attractive force. Similarly, ...
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2answers
353 views

Magnetic properties of matter

When a dielectric is placed in an electric field,it gets polarized. The electric field in a polarized material is less than the applied field. Now my query is, when a paramagnetic substance is kept ...
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1answer
130 views

Thermodynamics and electromagnetic fields

The energy density in an electromagnetic field is given by: $u = (1/2) <\vec{E}^2 + \vec{B}^2>$ where $<,>$ denotes the average over time. In a cavity it holds that $u= u(T) = ...
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2answers
1k views

Electric potential energy and speed

If we have electric field and we put electron there , the electron will move in the opposite direction as the electric field. My question is electron in that direction will speed up or slows down ? ...
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1answer
56 views

What role has our Moon played in creating a persistent geomagnetic field?

The question comes from a comment by Mark Rovetta on my earlier question about the Earth's core going cold.
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2answers
725 views

Einstein Field Equations and Electromagnetic Stress-Energy Tensor

My question is: if we write Einstein field equations in this form: $$R_{\mu\nu} - \dfrac{1}{2}g_{\mu\nu}R=8\pi \dfrac{G}{c^4}T_{\mu\nu}$$ Then the left hand side is one statement about the geometry ...
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1answer
140 views

Does a photon have a north and south pole?

A photon has an oscillating magnetic and electric field. Is the magnetic field a dipole?
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1answer
92 views

Can electromagnetic momentum be introduced at pre-university level as for electromagnetic energy?

Electromagnetic energy is introduced at pre-university level, starting with static electric energy followed by static magnetic energy. But the introduction of electromagnetic momentum usually has to ...
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1answer
356 views

a metal bar on a pair of conducting rails that carries a current

This is a homework question, and I solved it already, but something bugs me. So the problem is stated as following: A metal bar of mass M sits on a pair of long horizontal conducting rails separated ...
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0answers
115 views

Is the search for a Simple-group-based Electro-Weak theory over?

Just wondering: We know that, in its current form of the $SU(2)_L\times U(1)$, the electroweak theroy rides a wave of huge success. However, is it not possible that the correct simple group ...
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1answer
483 views

How many fundamental fields / constraints are in Maxwell's Equations?

I've seen electromagnetics formulated in the potentials ($\bf A$, $\varphi$) (and their magnetic counterparts) in the Lorenz gauge for a long time. Justifications for using these include that they ...
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3answers
1k views

Maxwell Stress Tensor in the absence of a magnetic field

I'm having some trouble calculating the stress tensor in the case of a static electric field without a magnetic field. Following the derivation on Wikipedia, Start with Lorentz force: $$\mathbf{F} = ...
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2answers
182 views

Radiated power from a 'source volume' outside which charge & current are zero (i.e. derive radiated power from Jefimenko's equations)

In classical electrodynamics, what is the radiated power from a generalized source (consisting of charge density $\rho$ and current density $\vec{J}$) in vacuum? Let us define $V_s$ to be the ...
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1answer
156 views

what is the difference between constant and changing magnetic and electric fields? How do they occur? How do they form an electromagnetic wave?

what is the difference between constant and changing magnetic and electric fields? How do they occur? How do they form an electromagnetic wave?
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2answers
2k views

Greens function in EM with boundary conditions confusion

So I thought I was understanding Green's functions, but now I am unsure. I'll start by explaining (briefly) what I think I know then ask the question. Background Greens are a way of solving ...
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3answers
2k views

Why is visible light used in Optical fibers (instead of other EM waves)?

Why aren't other electromagnetic waves used in optical fibres instead of visible light? Is it because the wavelength of light fits the internal reflection/refractive index of the material used for the ...
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2answers
938 views

How does lightning “know” where to go?

If lightning comes down in, say, a large flat field with a lightning rod sticking out of the middle, the lightning will strike the rod. How does it "know" the rod is there? Will it always strike the ...
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5answers
648 views

Form of the Classical EM Lagrangian

So I know that for an electromagnetic field in a vacuum the Lagrangian is $\mathcal L=-\frac 1 4 F^{\mu\nu} F_{\mu\nu}$, the standard model tells me this. What I want to know is if there is an ...
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0answers
102 views

How to calculate how weak does a magnet get when you get an other magnet closer to it?

I heard that when you take two magnets and get them closer together so they reject each other (north pole to north pole or south pole to south pole) they weakens. Does anybody knows how to calculate ...
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1answer
1k views

Length of wire required for solenoid to produce desired magnetic field

In a question: To construct a solenoid, you wrap insulated wire uniformly around a plastic tube 12cm in diameter and 50cm in length. You would like a 2.2 A current to produce a 2.6 kG magnetic ...
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3answers
5k views

Similarity between the Coulomb force and Newton's gravitational force

Coulomb force and gravitational force has the same governing equation. So they should be same in nature. A moving electric charge creates magnetic field, so a moving mass should create some force ...
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1answer
205 views

A rod filled with water and charged particles is rotated in magnetic field

Assume we have a rod of diameter $d$ and length $l$. It is filled with a mixture of water and, say, sodium chloride. Thus there are positively charged sodium ions and negatively charged chloride ions ...
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7answers
3k views

What happens to the magnetic field in this case?

As far as I know, it's possible to create a radially polarised ring magnet, where one pole is on the inside, and the field lines cross the circumference at right angles. So imagine if I made one ...
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1answer
117 views

Multimeter has a resistance

If a multimeter has a resistance (1M ohm, say) when measuring voltages how do I take that into account in my error?
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1answer
665 views

Electric field caused by magnetic field

Does electric field caused by time varying magnetic field form closed loops(electric field starts from a positive charge and ends at a negative charge)? and are they conservative or non-conservative ...
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1answer
162 views

Defining a local polarization field in a distribution of charge

I am currently building a theoretical model where charges of opposite signs are created by pairs and then diffuse and are drifted by an electrical field. I am taking this along a single so far, for ...
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2answers
133 views

Can the speed of an electromagnetic wave be measured in the absence of neutrinos?

Let me explain better: from what I understand neutrinos are so pervasive they are literally everywhere. And since they have such a tiny electric charge they barely interact with anything and cannot be ...
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0answers
259 views

Online magnetic field solver

Is there a site that allows you to give the approximate specs of a set of magnets and then it produces the graph of the magnetic field for you? Here is a situation I try to understand: I have a set ...
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1answer
1k views

Finding the Electric Field (and other information, besides)

The problem I am working on is: Two parallel plates having charges of equal magnitude but opposite sign are separated by 29.0 cm. Each plate has a surface charge density of 33.0 nC/m2. A proton is ...
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5answers
6k views

Why are AC quantities represented by sine waves always?

Usually we use a sinusoidal wave form to represent a alternating quantity. Why not a cosinusoidal wave or a ramp wave form? In sine wave forms we can indicate the maximum and minimum amplitude and ...
2
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1answer
211 views

A classically trivial quantum field theory of electromagnetism

Presumably there is a field theory of electromagnetism that classically gives trivial equations of motion, but when quantized shows interesting topological phenomena. I am talking about the Lagrangian ...
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1answer
237 views

Thermionic emission and delayed emission

I want to understand the concepts behind the thermionic emission. In thermionic emission, the energy randomization occurs and the energy may be split to electronic or roto-vibrational states. If this ...
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2answers
1k views

Puzzled by magnetized aluminum!

For a school project I bought a set of magnets and an aluminum strip. The magnets are places along both sides of the aluminum strip (all in the same direction). Now the aluminum strip is exhibiting ...
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2answers
539 views

Does Kaluza-Klein Theory Require an Additional Scalar Field?

I've seen the Kaluza-Klein metric presented in two different ways., cf. Refs. 1 and 2. In one, there is a constant as well as an additional scalar field introduced: $$\tilde{g}_{AB}=\begin{pmatrix} ...
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1answer
445 views

Faraday's Law and Galilean Invariance

In Jackson's text he says that Faraday law is actually: $$ \oint_{\partial \Sigma} \mathbf{E} \cdot \mathrm{d}\boldsymbol{\ell} = -k\iint_{\Sigma} \frac{\partial \mathbf B}{\partial t} \cdot ...
4
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2answers
914 views

Electromagnetic Wave Penetration into Conductors

Right now, I'm looking at two straightforward derivations of the dispersion relations of electromagnetic waves in conductors, and they seem to disagree on the low frequency attenuation. Could someone ...
0
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1answer
254 views

Inductively coupled DC circuit

The circuit under consideration has two inductively coupled loops, one with a DC battery, inductor, and resistor in series. The other loop has two inductors, one inductively coupled to the first, the ...
2
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2answers
3k views

Higher To Lower Electric Potential

The question I am working on is: "An electron moving parallel to the x axis has an initial speed of $4.65 \cdot 10^6~m/s$ at the origin. Its speed is reduced to $1.27 \cdot 10^5 ~m/s$ at the point ...
2
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3answers
481 views

Surface integral of Poynting vector around static sources

Consider fields $\rho \left( \vec{r} \right)$, $\vec{J} \left( \vec{r} \right)$, $\vec{E} \left( \vec{r} \right)$ and $\vec{B} \left( \vec{r} \right)$ in $\mathbb{R}^3$, with their usual meaning as ...
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3answers
204 views

Field energy of/from virtual Photons

I have a slightly out-of line question: Consider a single electron (or it's current if you please) The STATIC ELECTROMAGNETIC field surrounding it will (no doubt) have a field energy (T) to go with. ...
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3answers
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origin of magnetic field in a permanent magnet [closed]

I have a simple question. I hope I don't get a stupid answer. Where does the magnetic field of a permanent magnet comes from AND why is it permanent (are we dealing with perpetual motion)? This is ...
12
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5answers
17k views

Can someone please explain magnetic vs electric fields?

I've looked through about 20 different explanations, from the most basic to the most complex, and yet I still dont understand this basic concept. Perhaps someone can help me. I dont understand the ...
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1answer
102 views

NMR rotating frame

I'm reading about a linearly polarized field (in the context of NMR). The field is given by $$ {\bf H_{lin}}=2H_1({\bf i}cos(\omega_zt)).$$ This can be created by having a pulse field plus its ...
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2answers
378 views

What would result in a transformer that has its secondary wires disconnected from any circuit?

I am studying magnetism and I am curious as to what happens in a transformer that has its secondary output wires connected through a circuit versus one that doesn't. My main questions (in the case of ...
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2answers
334 views

What is a photon's speed inside a dieletric?

We know that EM waves are slowed down in a dielectric. But at what speed does the photons that make up the wave travel? Do they always travel at the speed $c$, but colliding/being absorbed and ...
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1answer
479 views

Is my electric power cord creating magnetic field when coiled?

Simple question. But I was wondering, does my mac power cord create a magnetic field when its all coiled?
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2answers
1k views

Why and how does symmetry work in circuits?

Why symmetry work in circuits? In my book there is no mention explanation as such for symmetry arguments and circuits. But there are circuits that are very difficult to solve without symmetry. Also I ...
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2answers
731 views

Under what condition charges do not flow in closed circuit?

I wanted to ask under what conditions will charges not flow in a closed circuit. Or when is current through the circuit zero even when an EMF is applied? Like in the case of potentiometer, we say that ...
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1answer
189 views

The Lorenz gauge in electrodynamics

What is the fundamental reason to fix the Lorenz gauge to $0$?