The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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101 views

Does the Lorentz force applied to a current carring wire by a magnetic field act in the negative or positive direction of the right hand rule?

If I say that I am calculating the Lorentz force $F$ applied to a wire carrying a current $i$ at a point $P$ in a magnetic field $B$, would the actual force be opposite of that given by the right hand ...
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0answers
77 views

Lorentz force helix

I have a few questions about the Lorentz force. Is it possible to create a Lorentz force helix in a cloud chamber and if so how would this be achieved? How would the pressure inside the helix be ...
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0answers
250 views

Hall effect with similar positive and negative carriers?

The Hall effect includes the transverse (to the flow of current) electric field set up by the charges which accumulate on the edges, to counter the magnetic component of the Lorentz force acting on ...
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2answers
2k views

Deriving the speed of the propagation of a change in the Electromagnetic Field from Maxwell's Equations

I've been told that, from Maxwell's equations, one can find that the propagation of change in the Electromagnetic Field travels at a speed $\frac{1}{\sqrt{\mu_0 \epsilon_0}}$ (the values of which can ...
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0answers
49 views

Do these steps demonstrate that acceleration of charged particle is proportional to current?

One formulation of Maxwell's Gauss Law for electric field is: $$\bigtriangledown E = 4 \pi k \rho $$ This can be worked into the Divergence Theorem as follows: $$\int\int_{A} F_\perp \:dA= 4\pi k ...
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3answers
159 views

Does electromagnetic radiation make sense in one dimension?

I'm trying to do a simple simulation of a 1D charged quantum particle, which gets irradiated by an electromagnetic wave — in context of non-relativistic QM. The Schrödinger equation for such a ...
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3answers
1k views

Is a real life electric shield possible? [closed]

I got this question from playing games like Halo and Borderlands (I know kinda dumb but raised a good question) in which the primary protection is an electric shield. Now I'm wondering if it would be ...
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1answer
244 views

What happens when molten metal cools within a strong magnetic field?

What happens when molten metal cools within a strong magnetic field? I don't know what more say, don't remember anything relevant to this in my uni text books.
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2answers
3k views

Do two magnets stacked on top of each other repel/attract stronger than just one magnet?

In designing a switch, I made it such that it "springs" back via two neodymium magnets (one in button repelling one in switch). I've found the magnets are too weak and don't spring back. I've resorted ...
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2answers
412 views

Motion of charge in magnetic field with drag force [closed]

Say you have a charged particle in a region that contains a fluid that will produce a drag force that goes as $F=-kv$ where $v$ is the speed and $k$ is some constant. The region also contains a ...
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1answer
84 views

In a non auto-ranging digital multimeter, what do the increasing numbers in the Ohm section represent?

For my science fair project I am measuring the resistance of nichrome wires under different conditions. I am using an Innova 3300 digital multimeter to measure the resistance. Other websites have told ...
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1answer
55 views

Calculating Energy & Small functional time scale

I have an electric motor that can apply a pull force of $3000 \;\mathrm{lb}$ (electric winch), it draws $180 \;\mathrm{A}$ at $12 \;\mathrm{V}$. I understand that power $P = I \cdot V = 2.1 ...
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1answer
495 views

Traditional Kirchoff voltage law in AC circuit?

The traditional (not taking into account phasor addition or complex addition) application of Kirchoff Voltage law, i.e. $\Sigma\Delta V=0$ along a loop, does not work for AC circuits. We can sum the ...
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3answers
12k views

Can the Earth's magnetic be used to generate electricity?

Since the Earth has a magnetic field, can it, in theory, be run through a conductive metal coil to create electricity?
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1answer
4k views

Optical constants of noble metals: the Drude model for microwave modelling

I have a question regarding the optical constants of noble metals. According to Johnson and Christy's paper Optical Constants of Noble Metals (Phys. Rev. B 6, 4370–4379 (1972), ...
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0answers
379 views

explain how does Rectenna work to someone with some college level physics

I understand that rectifying antenna (rectenna) is supposed to convert electromagnetic energy to electric current however I do not understand how it's really working. I do get that it's kind of like ...
2
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1answer
115 views

How to derive magnetic moment for integrated circuit level?

Imagine we have a circuit on the xy-plane, with a random geometry (it just need to be closed). I want to calculate the magnetic moment of this setup: $$\vec{m} = \frac{1}{2} \int_V d^3 x' \vec{x}' ...
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0answers
116 views

Lenz's Law and Eddy Currents

You can determine the direction of eddy currents according to Lenz's law. E.g. If a metal sheet is losing flux into the page, it will experience induced eddy currents in a clockwise direction to ...
3
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2answers
837 views

Does a conductor of total charge zero placed in a uniform external electric field experience net force?

The question I have in mind is: If we place a conductor (arbitrary shape) of total charge zero in a uniform external electric field $\textbf{E}_0$, does it experience any net force? Why (not)? Now I ...
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3answers
236 views

Is there energy stored when iron is magnetized?

When a piece of iron is magnetized, and the domains are aligned, Is there energy stored? If so, how much energy is stored? If there is an attraction between that same iron and the source of the ...
3
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1answer
245 views

Why does a light wave invert at a boundary with greater index of refraction?

Is there a reason why a EM wave reflects invertedly when it meets a boundary point with a greater index of refraction. In the case of ropes, if remember correctly, the reason why it inverts is to ...
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5answers
2k views

Home experiments using wireless LAN or mobile phones about electromagnetism?

Are there any nice experiments using wireless LAN access points or routers or mobile phones to demonstrate physical features of electromagnetic fields, especially em-waves? More precisely I am ...
2
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1answer
138 views

Does there exist electric field around all the substances?

A system of two equal and opposite charges separated by a certain distance is called an electric dipole. Electric dipole moment ($p$) is defined as the product of either charge ($q$) and the ...
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1answer
401 views

Why Inox Steel doesn't interact with magnets?

My dad has a HUGE magnet on his workshop. I love magnets, and when I saw it, I asked him what it was for. His reply was: "I don't know why, but inox steel bolts don't get attracted to it, so I use ...
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4answers
4k views

Why does evenly heating soup with a microwave take so long?

My anecdotal observations (which could be incorrect, they're totally unscientific) indicate that it takes almost as long to evenly heat a big bowl of soup in a microwave as it does to heat it on the ...
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0answers
265 views

Help Understanding Equation for Characteristic Time of Induced Magnetic Field

I am reading this book, the part in particular about Eddy-current separation starting at Page 246, in it there is an equation for calculating the "characteristic time with which the induced magnetic ...
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0answers
393 views

1-dimension radiation problem [closed]

A positive charge $q$ is fired head-on at a distant positive charge $Q$ ( which is held stationary ), with an initial velocity $v_{0}$. It comes in, decelerates to $v=0$, and returns out to ...
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0answers
170 views

What is the more fundamental quantity? The electromagnetic field F or the potential A?

Read somewhere that potential is a more fundamental quantity than EM field because if the latter is more fundamental then gauge transformation will reduce to nothing more than a mathematical trick. I ...
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2answers
409 views

What is the mechanism by which magnetic fields do work?

I've seen some conflicted answers to this question in texts and on the web, in the case of a dipole, for example. Do magnetic fields do work directly, or is it their induced electric fields that do ...
3
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3answers
457 views

Understanding the Ampere's Law

We want to study the magnetic field at point $P$. So, from the figure we take that: $\oint_{L_1} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_1$ $\oint_{L_2} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_2$ $\oint_{L_3} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_2$ The ...
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0answers
105 views

$E$ and $B$ fields in Axial Gauge

I am trying to compute the $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{B}$ fields in the Axial gauge ($n \cdot \vec{A}=0$) where $n^2=1$, but I'm having trouble seeing the usefulness/how it simplifies the equations.
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2answers
5k views

Why exactly does current carrying two current wires attract/repel?

When to parallel wires carrying currents in same direction I1 & I2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43AeuDvWc0k this video demonstrates that effect. My question is, why exactly does this happen? ...
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0answers
75 views

Boundary Condition for Generating Evanescent Waves

I'm reading through Novotny and Hecht's book on Nano-Optics (Principles of Nano-Optics), and I've come across a subtlety in the boundary conditions for evanescent wave generation (via total internal ...
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2answers
886 views

Why is a paramagnetic material attracted into a magnetic field?

I want to start by saying I've seen this topic: Attraction and repulsion of Magnetic materials and its supposed duplicates and it hasn't helped me very much. In the book Introduction to ...
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1answer
653 views

Physical Interpretation of Poynting Vector

I'm looking for a physical interpretation of the Poynting Vector. I understand that it should be thought of as an energy flow due to the electromagnetic field, but would I be correct in saying that in ...
3
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2answers
736 views

The Goos Hanchen shift mechanism

When the light is totally reflected in the interface between dense and less-dense medium, we know that the reflected beam will shift a little. Currently I have known the reflection coef r, will be a ...
2
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1answer
111 views

$\hat{\imath}$ component of force exerted on an electron by a magnetic field?

The magnetic field over a certain range is given by $\vec{B} = B_x\hat{\imath} + B_y\hat{\jmath}$, where $B_x= 4\: \mathrm{T}$ and $B_y= 2\: \mathrm{T}$. An electron moves into the field with a ...
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2answers
541 views

A difference between Plane Wave and Collimated?

Collimation is clearly in reference to ray($\vec{k}_{xy}$ vector) orientation unlike waterfront continuity( $\phi_{xy}$ phase shift) described by plane-wave. Not to say that one is not directly ...
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1answer
492 views

Electric potential difference from electric field of isolated spherical conductor

I'm wondering if my train of thought is correct. Say you have Point $A$ which is $A$ distance away from the center of an isolated spherical conductor, and Point $B$ which is $B$ distance away from the ...
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5answers
1k views

How would I explain Ohm's Law in terms of Electrical Fields and Force?

In terms of current, resistance, and voltage, it's easy: Ohm's Law is the relationship between current, voltage, and resistance of a circuit. Boom, simple as that. How could I put this in terms of $E$ ...
3
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1answer
758 views

Detecting EM radiation using android app

I wrote a simple android app that shows the magnetic field(using the magnetic field sensor in the phone) in the current location. When I place a two inch steel screw on the top of the phone (which ...
6
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2answers
2k views

How do electrons know which path to take in a circuit?

The current is maximum through those segments of a circuit that offer the least resistance. But how do electrons know beforehand that which path will resist their drift the least?
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0answers
81 views

Lasers can demagnetize ferromagnets?

How is it possible to demagnetize a magnet with a laser? Source: http://www.helmholtz-berlin.de/pubbin/news_seite?nid=13657&sprache=en&typoid And the paper: ...
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2answers
58 views

Speed of Magnetic Signal over Large Distance [duplicate]

If I had a very strong magnet on Earth and a very sensitive compass on Mars (just using planets to illustrate large distance), how long would the compass take to notice if I turned the magnet 180deg? ...
5
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2answers
400 views

Is there a good experiment to demonstrate Gauss's Law for Magnetism?

I'm trying to come up with a simple experiment that can demonstrate the properties of Gauss's Law for Magnetism. I am aware that it is a mathematical representation of the fact that magnetic ...
43
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8answers
4k views

How can Magnets be used to pick up pieces of metal when the force from a magnetic field does no work?

I learned that the force from magnetic fields does no work. However I was wondering how magnets can be used to pick up pieces of metal like small paperclips and stuff. I also was wondering how magnets ...
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1answer
54 views

which induced current produce due to magnetic field?

please i want to ask when induced current produced by changing magnetic field according to faraday's law is this current DC or AC current ?
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1answer
831 views

how can electromagnetic waves reach a cell phone in faraday cage?

is there any way to make electromagnetic waves reach a cell phone in faraday cage although conductor surround cell phone everywhere , can we pass current through conductor to make charges move as a ...
4
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1answer
205 views

Magnetic Dipole: How to plug into Maxwell's equations?

I read Magnetic Dipole point source in computational electro-magnetic literatures where it is used as exciting source. But I do not know how to plug this source into Maxwell's equations. Does it go ...
4
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1answer
705 views

How can I model buckyballs sticking together? (Tiny spherical magnets)

Buckyballs are a desktoy that consist of 216 tiny spherical magnets. You can makes all kinds of interesting shapes and structures out of them (do a Google search). I want to model them in a physics ...