The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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Electric force vs. Magnetic force

$E$, electric field $\to$ $H$, magnetic field $D$, electric flux density $\to$ $B$, magnetic flux density $D=\epsilon E$ $\to$ $B= \mu H$ Electric force calculation is based on electric field: ...
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52 views

Is there a material that could “convert” near infrared frequency to infrared?

I have a laser with a wavelength of 650 nm (visible red light) and was wondering if there is some sort of material that could be used to absorb and disperse a different frequency of light around (900 ...
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3answers
146 views

Plane waves - EM wave

An accelerating electric charge will emit transverse electromagnetic waves. These waves are propagating away in wave fronts that become flatter and flatter as getting further from the source. So they ...
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104 views

Can someone prove that the $\tilde{E}$ and $\tilde{H}$ fields in a waveguide looks as pictured?

Hi, I'm trying to use the solution to the wave's equation in a rectangular waveguide for $\tilde{E}$ and $\tilde{H}$ to show how I can get the above picture. For example, why is the magnetic field ...
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49 views

Is a flow of ionized water an electric current?

If $H_2O$ ions have a net electric charge and electric current is the flow of electric charge, can a stream of water ions be considered an electric current? If so, is it conceivably possible (not ...
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35 views

Possiblity of predicting behavior of system when properties described as functions over space?

Suppose I am given a system that consists of a distribution of charged particles(which are all over space and are point-charges). They are described by a set of functions instead of variables. These ...
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83 views

Is it necessary for EM fields to be dependent & co-exist in static conditions?

I was having a discussion today with one my colleagues in the lab about the independence and co-existence of EM fields.$$$$ My argument: In time-varying fields: EM fields are necessary dependent, ...
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63 views

protons and electrons

I am a novice in physics and a few things are not clear to me in electromagnetism: Consider the experiment of giving a piece of metal positive charge (which I assume consists of protons), by keeping ...
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75 views

Gravity and electromagnetism

If light bends due to the curved spacetime,would not the act of bending light warp space? How does one describe curved light?
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288 views

How do charged particles interact?

You'll have to forgive me if this question is too wrapped up in "classical" thinking. I've read that electrons and protons interact by trading photons, but this only raises more questions. What ...
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145 views

Electromagnetic induction of an uniform magnetic field

EDIT: Thanks to the first answer, I may see that there is differences between a giant solenoid and a completely uniform magnetic field. Therefore it would be great if one can explain to me both the ...
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116 views

Where does wave frequency come from

I am trying to wrap my head around where do oscillations in electromagnetic waves come from. As an example if I would take a string of guitar and ring it, it would produce a certain sound based on the ...
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147 views

Has a metric formulation of electromagnetism ever been attempted? [duplicate]

I understand that electromagnetic fields carry energy, and this energy curves spacetime gravitationally. That's not my question. I'm asking if anyone has tried to formulate electromagnetism in such ...
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92 views

Current in a strip - Scalar or vector [duplicate]

In certain books like David Griffiths electrodynamics , he treats current as a vector in some places. Moreover certain problems like current in a strip are often dealt with by taking current ...
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147 views

Ion Optics: Electric and Magnetic field. A comparison with Light Optics

When we compare ion optics with light optics, normally we consider electric field. For example Snell's law. $n_1\sin\theta_1$=$n_2\sin\theta_2$. When an electron move from one electric potential to ...
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183 views

Finding speed of light by $c=f\lambda$?

When considering EM radiation as waves it is said that it is electric and magnetic fields that oscillate with time. Therefore $f$ is not frequency of distance but of electromagnetic fields. I have ...
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157 views

Definition of Electromagnetic field?

Definition of Electromagnetic field? What is the Electromagnetic field at a given point in space due to a point charge being accelerated non-uniformly? Is there a single equation that can give me ...
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3answers
110 views

How long does it take a magnetic field to join both ends?

My question is: when a electromagnet is activated, the field must take time to form at both ends and stabilize. What is this time? Or, to put it differently, what is the speed at which the magnetic ...
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1answer
78 views

What happens to atoms in extremely strong electromagnetic fields?

I know that strong gravitational fields on the order of neutron stars (at the crust) atoms get compressed so tightly, the empty space between them is significantly reduced and it becomes denser. ...
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62 views

Electrostatic field in a Dielectric equations misbehaving

Equation 1: $\int{\vec{E}.\vec{ds}} = \int\frac{\rho_{free} + \rho_{bound}}{\epsilon_0} dv$ (Gauss's Law) Equation 2: $\int{\vec{D}.\vec{ds}} = \int\rho_{free} dv$ (Gauss's Law) , but $\vec{D} = ...
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361 views

time dependent current/ magnetic field

Is there a general way to calculate the magnetic field for a time dependent current of a long thing wire? For ex: If the current is $$ I(t)=I\sin wt, $$ is there a general method to use in order to ...
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221 views

Induced “Potential Difference” in Loop/How do Voltmeters work?

Say we have a single, solid circular loop of wire rotating at a constant angular velocity in a uniform magnetic field. There is an induced EMF creating a current in the wire. At the absolute ...
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38 views

Energy conservation in diamagnetic levitation

How do we account for conservation of energy in diamagnetic levitation when no external energy is required?
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134 views

Confusion with curl of Lorentz magnetic force

Since the magnetic force is a no work force, $dW=\vec F\cdot d\vec r=0$ for $\vec F(\vec r)=q(\vec v(\vec r) \times \vec B(\vec r))$, therefore $\oint \vec F \cdot d\vec r=0$ by Stoke's theorem. ...
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1k views

How could electromagnetic waves propagate through space although they have no electrons?

How could electric fields in these waves propagate through space although in space there's no electrons for the electric field to be formed? is there another type of charged particles that carry the ...
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446 views

Maxwell's equations of Electromagnetism in 2+1 spacetime dimensions

What would be different in the theory of electromagnetism if instead of considering the equations of Maxwell in 3+1 spacetime dimensions, one would consider 2+1 spacetime dimensions?
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5answers
339 views

Field inside a wire?

This answer gives a great explanation of why the field inside a wire connected to a battery must be equal at all points: Why doesn't the electric field inside a wire in a circuit fall off with ...
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119 views

Deriving and gaining intuition for the equation for the index of refraction $n = \sqrt{\mu_r\epsilon_r}$

I've come across the equation in the title. It relates the index of refraction of a substance to the square root of the product of the relative permittivity and the relative permeability at whatever ...
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2answers
135 views

Work producing current = energy stored in the magnetic field?

It is stated that "the formula for the energy stored in the magnetic field is: $$E = \left(\frac{1}{2}\right)(LI)^2$$ and the energy stored in the magnetic field is equal to the work done to produce ...
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142 views

Which angle should it be?

in the formula $$dB = \frac{\mu_0l ~|dl \times r|}{4 \pi r^3} $$ and the image where dl is in y-z plane and dB is in x-y plane. the ring conductor is in y-z plane carrying current I in ...
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85 views

Does the 1-D poisson's equation have monotonic potentials if $\rho=\rho(\phi(z))$?

I am solving the 1-D poisson equation: $$\frac{d^2 \phi}{dz^2}=-4\pi\rho(\phi)$$ with the additional requirement that $\rho(\phi(z=0))=0$. If I start by multiplying each side by $\frac{d\phi}{d z}$ ...
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177 views

is there any relation between resistance and magnetism?

i was holding a resistance wire(insulated) coiled up and both of its ends were connected to a Ohm-meter it was showing 18 ohms while the circuit was on i pulled the coil from both ends and made that a ...
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10k views

Dielectric Constant or Permittivity of Metals

I'm wondering what the dielectric constant or permittivity of metals is --particularly copper. Do metals have an infinite permittivity?
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71 views

Is it physically realistic to have an electric field and polarisation density but no displacement field?

Given a Lagrangian density that describes a classical dielectric in interaction with the EM field, I found the Euler-Lagrange equations, and in the case of the electric field, worked through to find ...
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488 views

Traditional Kirchoff voltage law in AC circuit?

The traditional (not taking into account phasor addition or complex addition) application of Kirchoff Voltage law, i.e. $\Sigma\Delta V=0$ along a loop, does not work for AC circuits. We can sum the ...
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1answer
1k views

Power dissipated on internal resistance of short-circuited voltage source

Suppose we have a voltage source with an EMF of $\mathcal{E}$ and an internal resistance $R$. If we connect to it a perfect wire with zero resistance, we get a short circuit. The value of the current ...
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1answer
175 views

How did neodymium magnets get their name?

Like in the question. Why neodymium magnets (Nd2Fe14B) are called "neodymium magnets"? Why not boron magnets? Or iron magnets?
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3k views

how does an electric field comes inside a conducting wire inside the circuit? [duplicate]

This has been a really great confusion for me now .... Many places i have read in books that when a potential difference is applied across the ends of a wire a constant electric field is generated ...
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68 views

Gradient of the potential originated from two similar magnetic vector potentials is not the same

The magnetic vector potential $\textbf{A}$ can be defined up to a gradient of a field. Adding or subtracting such gradient should not change the physics of the problem. The same reasoning is applied ...
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50 views

Is there a heuristic argument for the expression $ \textbf{g} = \frac {\mathbf{S}}{c^2}$?

Electromagnetic momentum density and the Poynting vector are related by the simple expression: $$ \textbf{g} = \frac {\mathbf{S}}{c^2}$$ It can be rigorously derived from Maxwell's equations, but is ...
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458 views

Deriving the Lorentz force from velocity dependent potential

We can achieve a simplified version of the Lorentz force by $$F=q\bigg[-\nabla(\phi-\mathbf{A}\cdot\mathbf{v})-\frac{d\mathbf{A}}{dt}\bigg],$$ where $\mathbf{A}$ is the magnetic vector potential and ...
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378 views

Local gauge invariance and fields

I have one question about local gauge invariance of the spinor and scalar theories. For the scalar complex field with lagrangian $L_{0}$ requirement of local gauge invariance leads us to the ...
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3answers
132 views

What are correlated magnetic moments?

My book has the following sentence and I don't understand what correlation or lack of correlation means: At high temperature the magnetic moments of adjacent atoms are uncorrelated (to maximize ...
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1answer
4k views

How to find the direction of the magnetic field for an infinite conducting wire?

We've got two long straight wires carrying current of 5A and placed along x and y axis respectively current flows in direction of positive axes we have to find magnetic field at a) (1 m,1 m) b) (-1 ...
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161 views

Understanding the basics of electromagnetic induction

Suppose two rings are kept facing each other and that one ring have some current which increases constantly. Will the other ring be attracted or repelled? Does this also depend on how they are kept?
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159 views

Is it possible for a photon to be at rest? [duplicate]

I know it doesn't really make sense if looking at the photon from the wave point of view, but is there any law of physics which prohibits a photon from stopping completely? Thanks.
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122 views

A question about electromagnetic stress-energy tensor

This is what we know as electromagnetic stress-energy tensor $T^{\mu\nu}$. Now I want to know what is its direct relation with $\rho$, charge density? $\rho\,?=T^{\mu\nu}$, $\frac ...
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247 views

Negative emf in AC generator

At a certain instant in AC generator, when the normal of the plane (rectangular coil) makes an angle of 270 degrees with with the magnetic induction B, the value of emf is: $E = -NAB\omega$ My ...
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147 views

Quantum Mechanics of Lenz's Law?

I've searched the internet and two famous QM books (Sakurai and Messiah) for Lenz's Law, but haven't found anything. So my question is what the quantum mechanical explanation to Lenz's law is? Can ...
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385 views

Faraday's Law and magnetic monopoles

The magnetic monopoles does not exist which can be shown by $ \int {\vec{B} \cdot d\vec{A}} = 0 $. But in Faraday's Law of electromagnetic induction, we clearly show the EMF induced is the time rate ...