The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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115 views

Why three families of multipole moments?

There are three families of multipole moments: The electric multipole moments, the magnetic multipole moments and the toroidal multipole moments. Is there any reason why there are this three families ...
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1answer
107 views

Dimensional Analysis in Electromagnetism (SI vs Gaussian-cgs)

Looking at Konopinski's formula for conjugate momentum (in the comment after equation 3 of "What the Vector Potential Describes"): p = M v + q A /c it is plain enough that M v is momentum, but if we ...
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3answers
519 views

Why does Snell's law not factor in wavelength?

If dispersion is caused due to different wavelengths bending with different angles, how is Snell's law right in generalizing it as $\sin(i) / \sin(r)$? Or am I missing something?
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2answers
107 views

Is neutron decay a purely electromagnetic phenomena?

Until reading the Phys.SE post here about the neutron decay I never feel strange the fact about the antisymmetricity of this decay. But indeed why this decay is antisymmetric. The neutron is his own ...
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1answer
34 views

Can induced-emf be divided?

A conductor's area is reduced by half or possibly more. I calculated the induced-emf based on the original area unreduced, does it make sense to divide the induced-emf value to the reduction factor? ...
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2answers
156 views

For Faraday's law, why does the emf decrease as you increase the area of the loop?

I've only recently started learning basic electrodynamics, but I don't understand why a loop of coil with a small area and a magnet falling through will produce a larger emf than a loop of coil with a ...
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2answers
56 views

Why can I blow up other potentials at the origin but not the one inside a dielectric sphere in an electric field?

While solving the electrostatic field for a dielectric in an electric field, we take the potential at origin to not blow and thus, we eliminate the inverse powers of r in the expression for general ...
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2answers
149 views

Instantaneous Coulomb interaction in QED

It seems I am stuck with a (at a first sight) trivial problem. It's from the "Quarks and Leptons" (Halzen, Martin) book page $141$, where one considers the following integral: $$\tag{1} T_{fi} = ...
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2answers
62 views

Thermodynamics of scattering theory

I have a couple of conceptual questions regarding the thermodynamics of scattering. Any partial answer or argument will be appreciated. For the sake of discussion, consider the scattering of ...
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1answer
66 views

Demagnetisation by throwing a magnet

I tried to answer this question in a book about electrodynamics: How to demagnetise a permanent magnet, ie. described by $ D_T$ change into described by (0,0) I figured out about heating it up ...
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2answers
59 views

No photon interaction in free space

How can the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect (photon bunching) be explained if photons don't interact in free space? To explain it with the influence of the two photons on the two detectors ...
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0answers
20 views

Can various wavelengths participate in C/D Interference?

My question is can multiple wavelengths or at least two different wavelengths interfere with one another? I know that they usually have to be the 'same' wavelength, but you'd think they can vary a bit ...
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1answer
86 views

Current in an RC circuit inside in a magnetic field

Does my question make any sense? Context: The capacitor is charged with charge $Q_0$. There is a magnetic field $B=B_0 \hat{z}$ perpendicular to the monitor's screen. The length of the (AB) wire is ...
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0answers
19 views

doppler shift through two mediums [duplicate]

When considering the Doppler shift, the 'canonical equation' is $$f=\frac{c+vr}{c+vs}f_0$$ However, this equation seems to run into trouble in the following situation: A light source inside water is ...
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3answers
101 views

internal conversion and the electromagnetic force

I have read that the mechanism behind internal conversion, in which a nuclear transition leads to the ejection of an electron in one of the lower atomic orbitals, is related to the fact that the ...
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1answer
72 views

Gravity and electromagnetism

If light bends due to the curved spacetime,would not the act of bending light warp space? How does one describe curved light?
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13 views

Degeneracy in quater-wave stack

Consider a 1D photonic crystal, the quarter-wave stack, and its band structure. A famous conclusion is that there's no gap at Brillouin zone's center. In other words, successive bands are degenerate ...
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0answers
52 views

What is the physical meaning of the norm of the electromagnetic four-potential?

In SI units this would be $\frac{1}{c^2}\phi^2 - A_x^2 - A_y^2 - A_z^2$. Is this just not a physically meaningful quantity at all because it's not gauge invariant?
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1answer
87 views

Relating Quantum Mechanics to Classic Electromagnetism [duplicate]

I've been directed to a few articles, and I am sure there is a related post, but can someone explain the procedure by which we can view classic electromagnetism through quantum mechanics? Indeed we ...
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2answers
86 views

Independent components in a 4-vector representing massless fields

In Ryder Page141, it is written "the electromagnetic field, like any massless field, possesses only two independent components, but is covariantly described by a 4-vector $A_{\mu}$". Why are there ...
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2answers
98 views

Why group velocity represents energy or information transmission? What relation between phase velocity and special relativity

I have two question, why group velocity represents energy or information transmission? what is the relation between phase velocity and Special relativity: why can it exceed C without violation of ...
2
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2answers
706 views

Circularly polarized light incident at Brewster's Angle

If a perfectly circularly polarized wave of light is incident on a dielectric medium (coming from air) at Brewster's Angle, what will the polarization state of the transmitted wave be? I am aware ...
2
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3answers
581 views

Conservation of energy in electromagnetism?

How is energy conserved in electromagnetism? Is it hinted only from Lenz's law or from Maxwell? Also, if a solenoid's flow of current produces a magnetic field, and from the magnetic field forces are ...
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1answer
87 views

Magnet spinning between two other magnets

Suppose, we have two magnets, MA, MB, and we have a third magnet MC in between the two magnets. Each magnets' north pole faces the other magnets south pole, and the magnets are placed horizontally ...
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1answer
51 views

Alignment of a system in equilibrium and its potential energy

Consider a flexible free conductor which is placed near a strong long bar magnet. How will the the conductor arrange itself if current is passed through it? I asked my professor: he gave me a hint ...
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1answer
64 views

Measuring mass by acceleration due to electromagnetic forces in free fall

My question is a simple one (I think): How precise will the results be if you attempt to measure the mass of a macroscopic object by measuring it's acceleration when a constant electromagnetic force ...
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7answers
5k views

Cyclist's electrical tingling under power lines

It's been happening to me for years. I finally decided to ask users who are better with "practical physics" when I was told that my experience – that I am going to describe momentarily – prove that I ...
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2answers
558 views

Does a current-carrying wire running through the centre of a solenoid experience force?

Imagine looking at a solenoid from above. Current passing is through it in a clockwise direction. The direction of the field lines therefore is towards the bottom of the solenoid. Now pass a straight ...
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1answer
126 views

Microscopic understanding of Brewster angle

The textbook explanation is that, at Brewster's angle, the electric dipoles excited by the incident light can't reradiate to the reflection direction since it's aligned with the dipole moments. Is ...
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4answers
2k views

Is one way glass possible?

I am not talking about mirrors, just a plain window made of glass like material. Would it be possible to allow light pass only in one direction but not the other?
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1answer
94 views

If electrons are magnets do they attract each other?

It is said every electron is negatively charged and so they repel each other but if electrons are tiny magnets(which are responsible for atomic attraction and how solid magnet works) does it mean ...
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1answer
33 views

Questions about electromagnetism [closed]

Are photons units of energy? What is the relation between EM force, EM energy and the photon? Do EM forces carry energy, do they carry the photon (as unit of energy)?
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0answers
573 views

Solenoid pull force & Velocity calculation

So I am building a circular accelerator (like a slightly oversimplified model version of CERN) as a physics project, and I'm at a dead end. I believe I need to know how to work out differential ...
3
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2answers
169 views

Finding the direction of the magnetic force acting on a conducting wire

I have a problem in finding the direction of the force when a conducting wire is placed in a magnetic field. If I use Fleming's Right Hand rule I get a circular magnetic field, so what will be ...
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2answers
160 views
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1k views

What is the meaning of this “let there be light” joke?

A middle school teacher across the restaurant is wearing this shirt, and I certainly don't get it.
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165 views

Who foots the (magnetic) energy bill?

Gravitational attraction and electrostatic attraction/repulsion are intrinsic properties of matter, any particle (electron, proton) for some unknown reason can produce KE at a distance. But magnetic ...
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2answers
709 views

What is the difference between induced current and eddy current?

I was reading today about electromagnetic induction and eddy currents. But while reading I was unable to differentiate between induced current and eddy current. What is the difference?
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1answer
252 views

How do you go from quantum electrodynamics to Maxwell's equations?

I've read and heard that quantum electrodynamics is more fundamental than maxwells equations. How do you go from quantum electrodynamics to Maxwell's equations?
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1answer
59 views

Torque due to a magnetic field

We have two infinite perpendicular wires, each carrying a current "i" and the distance between them is l. If both the wires are free to move, how will they arrange themselves because of the torque ...
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2answers
262 views

When can I use $\wedge$ instead of curl?

It seems in some circles the wedge product is used in preference to curl. I have a basic understanding of Green and Stokes' formula, I wish to use the $\wedge$ notation from now on. Can someone tell ...
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4answers
197 views

Sequence of E and B field in radio waves and in single photons

In antenna technology we distinguish between nearfield and widefield. In the nearfield the electric and the magnetic fields are shifted by 90°. If you look closer you can see that there are two ...
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36 views

Magnetic flux and flow of electrons

What does change in magnetic flux mean? How can you change magnetic flux? How does a change in magnetic flux influence a current of electrons (electricity)?
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1answer
203 views

Electric field generated by a point charge moving at the speed of light

As you see, this is the electric field generated by a point charge moving at constant speed v. I know that when $v$ -> 0, $E$ is just the Coloumb Law. But how do you interpret $E$ when $v$ -> $c$ ? ...
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2answers
937 views

Inductor Charging and Discharging

Why does the inductor discharges in the same path ( same direction of current ) as that of its charging unlike a capacitor which discharges in the direction opposite to its charging(current direction ...
3
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1answer
169 views

Why would a rotating charged sphere not have time varying electric field?

I have seen Gauss Law being used for a uniformly charged hollow sphere rotating with $\omega$. How is that valid to use Gauss law since it is an electrostatic law and if it is valid, why do we get a ...
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0answers
48 views

Momentum operator of a particle in an electromagnetic field

In quantum mechanics, to all observables correspond some self-adjoint operators. In the absence of an electromagnetic field the momentum operator is clearly $\vec{P}:=\frac{\hbar}{i}\vec{\nabla}$. ...
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23 views

What is the difference between primary and volume currents in electromagnetism?

What is the basic difference between the two currents and how each is contributing to the magnetic field at source and the surface?
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1answer
90 views

Why is optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) called “topological charge”?

The terminology "topological charge" is frequent in lots of research papers related to optical vortex or optical OAM, it is used to represent the optical OAM. Why? How to comprehend it?
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3answers
2k views

Can a third type of electrical charge exist?

Upon reading my book on physics, it mentions that there are only two discovered types of electric charges. I wonder if there could be a third type of elusive charge, and what type of effects could it ...