The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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Determining the attraction of a magnetic bob

I have a question concerning the calculation of the attraction to a ferromagnetic material in a coupled B-field, which of $N \geq3$ equally strong cylindrical permanent magnet is produced. ...
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1answer
50 views

Attraction & Lorentz force, at the same time?

If a conductor carrying current is placed inside a magnetic field, we know that there is the Lorentz force pushing the wire. But what about the attraction force between the wire's field and the ...
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3answers
140 views

Electromagnetism: Conductors

Even though the thermal velocity of electron in a conductor is comparatively high, the thermal velocity is not responsible for current flow? Why is this the case?
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2answers
119 views

Is it possible to design a large permanent magnet that creates a multi-Tesla field?

Is it ever possible to create a LARGE magnet (in meters wide/long) that could potentially create a powerful magnetic field?
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76 views

Electromagnetic waves and boundaries

I am reading about dielectric boundaries and electromagnetic plane waves following griffiths ch7. When considering a boundary at z=0 with electric fields perpendicular to the plane of incidence it ...
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1answer
54 views

Torque on wire summarized with magnetic moment

The magnetic moment of a current-carrying wire loop $L$ is $$ \boldsymbol\mu = \frac I2\oint_L\mathbf{r} \times \mathrm{d}\mathbf{r} $$ so the torque it experiences under a uniform magnetic field ...
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1answer
37 views

How you call the constant $\alpha$ within the heat equation in general and in terms of electromagnetism?

The heat equation or diffusion equation does contain a constant $\alpha$. $$\frac{\partial u}{\partial t} - \alpha \nabla^2 u=0$$ How is it called? I'm interested in a general name which can be ...
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2answers
621 views

Why is bandwidth, range of frequencies, important when sending wave signals, such as in radio?

So in wired/wireless networking and radio, signals are sent in form of wave. Then the concept of bandwidth comes in, which is the difference between highest frequency and lowest frequency in a signal. ...
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1answer
78 views

Reflection from multiple thin films: accounting for lost light due to small surface area

I have a problem similar to reflection of multiple thin films. I have light coming in from medium 1 and I want to find the total reflected intensity after being reflected inside 2 layers. However, I ...
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3answers
198 views

Describing a circular current loop as delta functions

It would be really nice to see how Jackson got eqn 5.33 on his example problem for finding the vector potential of a circular current loop $$ ...
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1answer
201 views

Does the weight of an magnet raise when balancing an object?

I was wondering if say I use an magnet which is facing positive and then I expel an another magnet above it which is facing the positive with its positive side and I ensure the magnet does not rotate ...
2
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2answers
73 views

Magnetic field in materials with non-constant magnetic susceptibility

I'm quite lost what $B$ and $H$ is. It seams to me that most of the texts I read do quite poor job in explaining them properly. They are explained only in cases when magnetic susceptibility is ...
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1answer
84 views

What is the significance of the difference in the eigenvalue equations of Bloch functions for electrons vs photons?

any text on photonic crystals will highlight the almost perfect analogy between electrons in a periodic potential and photons in a periodic dielectric. The analogies are: $$V(\vec r + \vec R) = ...
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2answers
102 views

Can the magnetic fields of EM radiation be harnessed or measured?

We use the electric component of EM radiation to create the EM radiation and to detect it (antennas and Etc.), but does anyone know of a situation where the magnetic component of EM radiation is used? ...
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1answer
89 views

Magnetic field of a stationary electron

As far as I know, a magnetic field can only be produced by a moving electric charge, or from a particle's spin (this is how a permanent magnet works, all the spins are in the same direction) What is ...
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2answers
121 views

Does the geomagnetic field rotate?

The Earth rotates about it's own axis. Do the geomagnetic field lines rotate due to this rotation or not?
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4answers
13k views

Why do electrons occupy the space around nuclei, and not collide with them?

We all learn in grade school that electrons are negatively-charged particles that inhabit the space around the nucleus of an atom, that protons are positively-charged and are embedded within the ...
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0answers
28 views

Question on envelope-carrier description of traveling wave

I'm doing a research internship in attosecond physics right now, and one of the really important things in the field is the description of a propagating laser pulse as the combination of a slowly (or ...
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3answers
146 views

In scattering, how does a particle 'know' which direction it is being illuminated from?

In scattering experiments, for example light scattering, the scattering strength from different sized particles is depicted as below. What I can't understand is: how does a particle know which ...
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2answers
189 views

What happens from the point when we apply potential difference across an inductor?

I am in a serious doubt about it. Consider a battery of emf E and we connect it to an inductor. Initially the switch is open, now we close the switch. My question is: What mechanism happens just ...
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3answers
816 views

Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Flux Quantization in superconductors

Why is the magnetic flux not quantized in a standard Aharonov-Bohm (infinite) solenoid setup, whereas in a superconductor setting, flux is quantized?
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1answer
115 views

How does an accelerating charge radiate electromagnetic waves? [duplicate]

When a charged particle gets accelerated it emits electromagnetic waves. In reality, when a charged particle gets accelerated the electric field around the charge remains unchanged, but the magnetic ...
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2answers
2k views

Why are magnetic fields so much weaker than electric?

In EM radiation, the magnetic field is $ 3*10^8$ times smaller than the electric field, but is it valid to say it's "weaker". These fields have different units, so I don't think you can compare them, ...
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2answers
160 views
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88 views

Where does wave frequency come from

I am trying to wrap my head around where do oscillations in electromagnetic waves come from. As an example if I would take a string of guitar and ring it, it would produce a certain sound based on the ...
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1answer
46 views

Determine the electric field [closed]

A loop of wire is put in a changing magnetic field. The magnetic flux through the loop is given by $4t(t+2)$. The loop is connected to a parallel plate capacitor that has a plate separation of 15mm. ...
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2answers
98 views

Electromagnetic Inductance: Different voltmeter readings from different positions

In the setup below, the voltmeter on the right would read differently than the voltmeter on the left even though they are both connected to point D and point A. This picture is taken from Lecture ...
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3answers
56 views

Magnetic moment - magnetic field relation without free currents

I'm trying to understand magnetostatics in the presense of ferromagnetic material. But I'm ending up in a contradiction: Lets take a piece of iron: Assuming that we don't care about the hysteresis ...
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1answer
259 views

The Aharonov-Bohm effect is purely classical, right?

Every discussion I've ever seen of the Aharonov-Bohm effect makes a big deal of its being a quantum effect with no classical analogue. But as far as I can tell it is present already at the classical ...
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1answer
144 views

Calculating equipotential lines and current density in a rectangular conductor

(This isn't homework, I'm trying to make an illustration for an article I'm writing.) Let's say that I have a thin rectangular bar of uniform conductivity, and I have point probes at various places: ...
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5answers
5k views

Why are AC quantities represented by sine waves always?

Usually we use a sinusoidal wave form to represent a alternating quantity. Why not a cosinusoidal wave or a ramp wave form? In sine wave forms we can indicate the maximum and minimum amplitude and ...
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2answers
109 views

How can I apply Conservation of Energy in electromagnetism?

How can I apply C.O.E to a system that applies magnetic & electric fields at the same time to do work, and convert energy from one form to another? Let assume we have a conductor that moves ...
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0answers
18 views

Equation describing the motion of an object attracted to magnet [closed]

Imagine there is a strong magnet at (0, 0). There is a horizontal rail on y=1 on which a ferromagnetic object rides. The object ...
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1answer
61 views

Why can we allow the speed of light being infinite in case of Surface Plasmons?

I have a problem with understanding of these sentences: We have indicated in the opening paragraph of the Introduction that surface plasmon polaritons are solutions of Maxwell’s equations in ...
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1answer
60 views
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1answer
133 views

If light is an electric and (magnetic field), how can it be absorbed?

I was wondering how light or any electromagnetic radiation can be "absorbed" if it consists of electric and magnetic fields. For example if there is a charge at point A, and the light reaches point ...
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0answers
34 views

Does the skin effect and the proximity effect cancel each other out?

I'm interested in how the Skin Effect and the Proximity Effect interact with each other. From what I can understand: The Skin Effect is when AC current 'collects' on the skin of conductors due to ...
2
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1answer
121 views

Relationship between Polarizability and Conductivity

I've seen in the literature the relation: $\sigma (q,\omega) = \frac{i e^2 \omega}{q^2}\chi(q,\omega)$ where $\sigma$ is the conductivity and $\chi$ the polarizability. However my attempt to derive ...
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2answers
75 views

How to feel or sense magnetic fields from earth?

I know that earth has magnetic fields/forces, but why we don't feel them? So if I hold a magnet and earth's magnetic field is positive and my magnet is from the positive side, then why the magnet does ...
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5answers
29k views

Is aluminium magnetic?

From high school, I remember that Aluminium has 13 electrons and thus has an unpaired electron in the 3p shell. This should make Aluminium magnetic. However, the wiki page of Aluminium says its ...
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1answer
332 views

What does “optical conductivity” mean?

Does it just mean "AC electric conductivity"? If so, why have a special name for it, and why mention optical specifically? The wikipedia page on it is very sparse. This (warning, PDF) document just ...
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2answers
175 views

Aharonov-Bohm Effect electricity generation

This question is based on highly intuitive picture of the Aharonov-Bohm effect (perhaps a naive one). From what I have read, the current explanation of the AB effect is that although the electron ...
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2answers
111 views

Faraday Effect does light bend or lose energy?

I was reading upon Faraday effect when it said Faraday effect causes a rotation of the plane of polarization That in mind, does this mean the light can be bent around or does the light loose ...
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1answer
152 views

The workings of the Hall effect?

I want to ask about the workings of the Hall effect. Why do the electrons come to rest on the edge of the wire? The magnetic field pushes them up, and the electric field pushes them forward. Shouldn't ...
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2answers
52 views

If outside a cylindrical solenoid exist an electrical field what does that mean to the Aharonov-Bohm Effect?

To the question "What is the electric field outside a cylindrical solenoid when inside is turned on a magnetic field" the answer is that outside exists a electric field. Does that mean that the ...
7
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1answer
300 views

Reluctance of torus shaped iron core with embedded wire loop

Imagine a circular wire loop (r = 50mm), the wire has an assumed diameter of zero, which is embedded in a torus shaped iron core with a circular cross-section of R = 10mm. A current in that loop ...
2
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1answer
466 views

Induction and Halbach Array

I have recently studied and tried to understand the concept of the Inductrack ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inductrack ), a form a magnetic levitation. In the following link they present three ...
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1answer
176 views

Reconciling total internal reflection and the evanescent Wave

I understand that light is guided in a dielectric waveguide via total internal reflection. My question is regarding the origin of power contained in the evanescent field traveling along the direction ...
2
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0answers
91 views

How to properly construct the electromagnetic tensor in curved space-time? (Part II)

In this question, I am testing what was previously discussed. I can't seem to get my results to match D'Inverno's electromagnetic tensor for a charged point (page 239 of his book - Introducing ...
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2answers
335 views

Positive charges “move” from higher to lower potential [closed]

It's my understanding that whenever an object gains or loses electric charge this actually corresponds to losing/gaining electrons (protons do not move). So how can a positive charge always move from ...