The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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118 views

Description of the motion of the COM of a system of charged particles moving in a magnetic field

I recently came across a problem where an electrically neutral particle is at rest in a uniform magnetic field. The particle now splits into two charged particles of equal mass $m$; charge and mass ...
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0answers
25 views

Longitudinal dielectric wave does it exist in charge free region?

can we transmit energy through Longitudinal dielectric wave when the surrounding is charge free. Please give me a good link about L.M.D. I a beginner about this topic.
1
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1answer
201 views

Why there is a time gap between the news presenter and the field reporter?

This one has been in my mind for years, but I simply can not find any reason for this event. The Situation Imagine yourself sitting in the living room while watching television. It's 9 p.m and the ...
1
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2answers
127 views

Is this an example of Parity violation? [duplicate]

I always hear about parity violation in high energy physics, but what about examples in classical physics? Say we have a wire carrying current in the $+x$ direction, thus generating a magnetic field ...
20
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3answers
4k views

What is the answer to Feynman's Disc Paradox?

[This question is Certified Higgs Free!] Richard Feynman in Lectures on Physics Vol. II Sec. 17-4, "A paradox," describes a problem in electromagnetic induction that did not originate with him, but ...
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3answers
197 views

How does an electron undergoing uniform circular motion exactly lose energy?

One of the main reasons for the failure of the Rutherford model of atomic structure, it is famously stated, is that the electron undergoing circular orbit loses energy since due to its centripetal ...
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1answer
40 views

What is the dormant common ground between harmonic mechanical oscilators and electromagnetical ones?

When I learnt electromagnetic oscillators I couldn't help but notice that it has many common stuff with mechanical ones. I know that it had to have sinusoidal equations. I (firstly, without ...
4
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4answers
601 views

Why does optical pumping of Rubidium require presence of magnetic field?

The optical pumping experiment of Rubidium requires the presence of magnetic field, but I don't understand why. The basic principle of pumping is that the selection rule forbids transition from ...
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0answers
18 views

Mechanism of Current flow in Metals [duplicate]

I do not fully understand the mechanism of current flow in conductors. It cannot be that a current starts only when an electron from one terminal of the electric supply physically reaches the other ...
3
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1answer
155 views

Vector fields and tensors in E&M

I'm confused by a very basic property of electric fields. The electric field is a vector field. Vectors are tensors. Wikipedia has the following statement in the article about the electromagnetic ...
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4answers
4k views

Can superconducting magnets fly (or repel the earth's core)?

If a superconducting magnet and appropriate power supply had just enough $I\cdot s$ (current $\cdot$ length) so that when it was perpendicular to the earth's magnetic field, the force of the ...
2
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0answers
64 views

Induced emf in a circular conducting wheel

Consider a conducting wheel with $N \in \mathbb{N}$ spokes which is completely in a homogenous magnetic field $\vec{B}$ perpendicular to the wheel plane. ...
4
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3answers
508 views

What causes radioactivity? Is it a quantum mechanical effect?

I'm just curious what causes radioactivity. I've been told that in the case of alpha decay, since the nucleus is quantum mechanical, there is a probability that the configuration of protons and ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Help understanding this differential equation of a varying electromagnetic field [closed]

I'm reading some lecture notes (we're studying blackbody radiation and are approaching Planck's formula) but I'm struggling to understand exactly what's being said. So the lecture notes read as ...
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0answers
92 views

Velocities of waves (such as visible light, and radio)

The speed of light in a vacuum is a constant 299,792,458 m/s. In water, it is much slower. Does this happen to such waves as radio, or X-ray? (Would say, a 3 meter wavelength travel slower in air than ...
2
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2answers
68 views

$ε_0$ affects electric field intensity, but $μ_0$ doesn't affect magnetic field intensity?

I'll be honest: this question is actually a homework problem. I've spent the past hour going through Google and several textbooks trying to answer the question "Why does $ϵ_0$ affect electric field ...
1
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1answer
303 views

Derivation of Maxwell stress tensor from EM Lagrangian

From Noether's theorem applied to fields we can get the general expression for the stress-energy-momentum tensor for some fields: $$T^{\mu}_{\;\nu} = \sum_{i} (\frac{\partial \mathcal{L}}{\partial ...
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0answers
75 views

Electrical Resistance of Spherical, Contacting Colloids

So, I work a lot with Magneto-Rheological (MR) fluids - which are essentially electrolyte solutions with suspended, paramagnetic colloids/particles. Once a magnetic field is applied to such a fluid, ...
2
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2answers
6k views

How do transformers work?

A transformer is basically a primary inductor connected to a voltage $U_P$ which you want to transform. You also have an iron rod and a secondary inductor. So when there is a current $I_P$ the iron ...
0
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1answer
84 views

Does magnitude of a charge influence magnitude of force that individual charge exerts on another charge [closed]

two point charges, q1 and q2, are placed 0.3m apart on the x-axis, as shown in the figure above. Charge q1 has a value of -3 nano Coulomb and q2 has a value of +4.8 x10^-8 C. The net electric field ...
0
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0answers
85 views

Electrical field of the coil

Take the case of two coils, first one connected to alternating current supply, and the second one connected to load. First coil creates magnetic field, and electric field is reduced by anti-emf ...
3
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2answers
996 views

Prove a dielectric with infinite dielectric constant behaves as a conductor for static fields

I read the following problem: Prove that a dielectric medium for which $\varepsilon \to \infty$ behaves as a perfect conductor in the presence of static electric fields. So, the easy part is that the ...
0
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1answer
144 views

Voltage across an inductor contradicts Lenz's law?

Imagine a simple circuit consisting of an alternating current source connected to an inductor. Assume they are connected in the following fashion: AC source - terminal A - Inductor - terminal B - AC ...
7
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0answers
98 views

Electric charges on compact four-manifolds

Textbook wisdom in electromagnetism tells you that there is no total electric charge on a compact manifold. For example, consider space-time of the form $\mathbb{R} \times M_3$ where the first factor ...
2
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1answer
25 views

What happens when a force is applied to a flux pinned superconductor?

When a force is applied to a superconductor to move it in a direction that it resists because it is flux pinned, where does the additional energy used to overcome the flux pinning resistance go? E.g. ...
1
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1answer
38 views

How can we derive that an accelerated charge particle will radiate EMWs?

All the properties of the electromagnetic entity is said to be fully described by the four golden rules of Electromagnetism : The Maxwell's Equations.How can we derive that a charged particle will ...
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0answers
81 views

Conceptual question on helmholtz equation

Given the homogeneous Helmholtz Equation $[\triangledown ^2 + \kappa^2] E= 0$, I understand $\kappa$ represents the wavenumber $\omega_0 / c$. In light of this, what physical meaning can be taken from ...
2
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1answer
83 views

What is $\epsilon_\infty$ in this equation and why can it be neglected in the IR?

I'm reading this paper (warning, PDF) and they mention that the complex permittivity $\epsilon$ and complex conductivity $\sigma$ are related through the equation $$\epsilon - \epsilon_\infty = (4\pi ...
0
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1answer
108 views

Why does the magnetic force exerted by two charged particles on each other do no work?

An electron and a proton are moving under the influence of mutual forces. In calculating the change in the kinetic energy of the system during motion, one ignores the magnetic force of one on another. ...
2
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2answers
98 views

Where does the $\partial \vec{E}/\partial t$ term from Maxwell's equation go in Ampere's Law?

One of Maxwell's Equations (ME) is: $$\nabla\times\vec B = \mu_0\vec J+\epsilon_0\mu_0 \frac{\partial \vec E}{\partial t}.$$ While Ampere's Law (AL) is: $$\nabla\times\vec B = \mu_0\vec J.$$ ...
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0answers
42 views

Will there be an induced emf in this situation?

Here is a (horrible) illustration: The first ring has a voltage $V_1$ applied to it through the voltage source on the left. Ring 1 has resistance $R_1$ whereas ring 2 has resistance $R_2$. Will ...
0
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0answers
23 views

How big can be gradient of magnetic induction (in lab)

I'm thinking about magnetic levitation and how big force can push a diamagnetic when we put it in inhomogenious magnetic field. As far as I know, force exerted on a diamagnetic is proportionald to ...
0
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1answer
70 views

Speed of a charge in a magnetic field

Does speed of a charged particle change in a non-uniform magnetic field? I know that a uniform magnetic field cannot change the $KE$ of the particle, i.e. $\frac{1}{2}mv^{2}$ is constant. And we ...
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2answers
171 views

What is the meaning of electron's magnetic effect cancelling each other?

I'm trying to understand, why magnets attract certain metals but not objects made out of paper, plastic etc. And the answer I got is "in paper, electrons cancel each other". What does it mean?
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0answers
39 views

Could a 1kHz EM field be detectably disturbed by an action potential?

This might be completely off base, but I'm wondering if this would be possible. Neurons fire action potentials that can be modeled as low-intensity (~100mV) EM pulses of 1kHz frequency (up and back ...
0
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2answers
86 views

Orientation of spontaneous magnetisation in cooling ferromagnet

I'm trying to understand the direction of magnetic moments in a ferromagnetic material after cooling down below it's Curie temperature. A permanent magnet of ferromagnetic material will loose it's ...
3
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5answers
410 views

Why doesn't this perpetual motion machine work?

Imagine a non-magnetic tube bent into the shape of a triangle, with two sides forming downhill ramps, and the third side connecting the two ramps. Through this tube travels a metal ball, which is ...
5
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1answer
623 views

Maxwell's Stress Tensor

What really is the Maxwell Stress Tensor? I understand that it's derived from $$\mathbf {F} = \int _V ( \mathbf E + \mathbf v \times \mathbf B )\rho \ d \tau$$ Griffiths describes this as "total EM ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Finding electric field of a line charge [closed]

I have a bit of an issue setting up the integral for finding an electric field of a particular scenario. The scenario is that a line charge of length R is a distance R from the left side of the ...
3
votes
1answer
131 views

Force exerted by light on a moving mirror

Consider a light with energy density E shining uniformly over a mirror. The mirror has an area A. The mirror is moving at with a velocity β. Calculate the force that the photons exert on the ...
2
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0answers
424 views

Are the poles of a hollow electromagnet on the ring or in the center?

Question: Will this work as I've shown it here, more or less, or will the iron cylinder being hollow produce results not shown? Topic: I'm experimenting with magnetic fields and have been testing ...
8
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1answer
257 views

Materials with different gravitomagnetic permeability?

If you start with general relativity, and assume small perturbations around a nearly flat metric, it is possible to obtain linearized equations of gravity that look a lot like Maxwell's equations, ...
1
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1answer
141 views

Maxwell's equation for non inertial observer

Applying Maxwell's equation we can prove that light will move at the speed of light for every inertial frame, is it true as well for non-inertial frames? How light moves slowly near a black hole??
2
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0answers
29 views

Categorization of electromagnetic solitons?

I've seen over the years several mentions of electromagnetic solitons that appear in the high-intensity regime (where vacuum polarization becomes important). Some of these are coupled with plasmas, ...
3
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1answer
110 views

How can Maxwell theory be viewed in terms of two-layer structure?

I'm trying to learn more about Maxwell equations and stumbled upon an essay by professor Freeman J. Dyson from Princeton. He explained Maxwell theory in a very interesting way. The modem view of ...
2
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4answers
582 views

Application of Kirchhoff's laws in circuits with inductors

As we know,the Kirchhoff circuit laws are applicable for conservative electric fields. Now it is applicable for circuits where inductors are present but the field there is not conservative. So how ...
1
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0answers
27 views

How to make an evenly distributed strong electromagnetic surface (diameter ½ meter) [closed]

I need to put neodymium magnets very close to each other on a a circular surface with a diameter of $\frac{1}{2}\, \mathrm{m}$. The magnets do NOT want to be close unless they are forced to by a ...
2
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1answer
115 views

Does Gravity Warp Coulomb's force?

Does gravity effect the "sphericalness" of the Coulomb force? For example, is the field 1 meter above a charge weaker than the field 1 meter below the charge? Could a 0.014% difference in the field ...
6
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2answers
267 views

Experiment which shows that Newtons third law is not true for magnetic forces

I am just reading David Morins "Introduction to Classical Mechanics". He writes about Newtons third law the following: It holds for forces of the “pushing” and “pulling” type, but it fails for ...
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2answers
2k views

Why does the thickness of a wire affect resistance?

For small thicknesses of wire, it's pretty obvious why resistance affects thickness. (The electronics squeeze to get through). But after a certain thickness shouldn't the thickness become irrelevant? ...