The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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116 views

Could the 4 Forces Split Off or “Decay” into Other Forces in the Distant Future? [duplicate]

From my basic understanding of popular-level physics articles and books and such, the 4 forces (Electromagnetism, Gravity, Strong and Weak Force) used to be 1 force in the early universe, then split ...
3
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1answer
305 views

What's the difference between “Ohmic dissipation”, “Joule heating”, “ion drag” and “resistive heating”?

The following terms are sometimes used to refer to ... more or less ... the same thing by different people and in different contexts (electronic circuits vs. plasma physics, etc.): Ohmic ...
3
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133 views

How much external field have to be applied to saturate a Mu metal shield till magnetization?

My main goal is to magnetize and demagnetize a Mu metal shield. Till now I am using a Helmholtz coils setup and I can generate 10 mT applying 2 A DC. I am using a DRV425 fluxgate and a hall probe ...
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2answers
200 views

How does an infrared thermometer actually calculate temperature?

I am slightly confused about infrared radiation and the equations related to it. $P = A \epsilon \sigma T^4$ (1) and $B_{\lambda}(\lambda,T) = \frac{2hc^2}{\lambda^5} \frac{1}{e^{\frac{hc}{\lambda ...
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291 views

What is the difference between a magnon and a spinon?

For a long time, I thought the terms "magnon" and "spinon" were equivalent, describing the collective spin excitation in a system. Lately, I have seen remarks in the literature that they indeed do ...
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266 views

Induced magnetic field produces electric field and vice versa forever!

So here are the two of Maxwell's laws that I am interested in: So we have the simple circuit (from google): So, before the system goes into steady-state we know that charge slowly accumulates on ...
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114 views

What does it physically mean to take the curl of the curl of a field (wave equation derivation)?

What does it physically mean to take the curl of the curl of a field in the derivation of the electromagnetic wave equation from Maxwell's equations, as presented here, on Wikipedia? Why was it a ...
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95 views

Is the Lorentz force expression valid for magnetic field created by a magnetic monopole?

Will the Lorentz force expression be valid for a magnetic field created by a magnetic monopole? I haven't seen any derivation of Lorentz force expression yet and I don't know whether it was derived ...
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359 views

What happens in a gas of magnets?

This SMBC comic asks what happens if you make a gas of magnetic particles: I was wondering whether anyone has run into actual examples of this or something like it. A classical example similar to ...
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66 views

Force acting on a polar molecule

What kind of force does act on a polar molecule? I mean, there must be a force that is acting on the molecule to keep the negative and positive centre away ( like in H2O). Why the positive and ...
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2answers
170 views

Can electromagnetic fields be used to deconstruct and reconstruct molecular bonds?

I was thinking one day and came up with a theory after reading about how scientists were studying anti-matter by using electro magnetic fields to separate matter from the anti-matter they made. It got ...
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353 views

Why is there no induced electric field in the experiment (Faraday's Law)

Below are three circuit diagrams for each of Faraday's experiments that allowed Faraday to come up with Faraday's Law. In Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics Griffiths states (on page 302 of ...
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352 views

Why is Bose-Einstein condensation a phase transition?

Bosons may succumb to a Bose-Einstein condensation at a certain critical temperature $T_c$, thus entering the BEC phase. The only thing I know about the BEC is that since we are talking about bosons ...
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213 views

Superposition of electromagnetic waves and energy localization

Sorry for the long question. I didn't know how to make it shorter. I'm trying to understand how energy is spatially localized in an electromagnetic wave. My premises are: Electromagnetic energy is ...
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1answer
175 views

Biot-Savart for current carrying wire

A homework question has made me doubt my understanding of the application of the Biot-Savart law. Question: The magnetic field 43.0 cm away from a long, straight wire carrying current 5.00 A is ...
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207 views

Is Magnetism and Electromagnetism the Same Thing?

I keep hearing everywhere that magnetism and electromagnetism are different but is seems to me that when a current is moving and it creates a "magnetic field", it is just electrons repulsing other ...
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1k views

Landau level degeneracy in symmetry gauge, finite system

As we know, Landau level degeneracy in a finite rectangular system is $\Phi/\Phi_0$, where $\Phi=BS$ is the total magnetic flux and $\Phi_0=h/q$ is the flux quanta. This can be easily derived using ...
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207 views

Electromagnetic reaction force?

The classical (retarded) Lienard-Wiechert scalar and vector potentials describe the electromagnetic field due to an arbitrarily moving electric point charge. Thus given the motion of electron $A$ one ...
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1answer
156 views

How can Maxwell theory be viewed in terms of two-layer structure?

I'm trying to learn more about Maxwell equations and stumbled upon an essay by professor Freeman J. Dyson from Princeton. He explained Maxwell theory in a very interesting way. The modem view of ...
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1answer
103 views

Au, Ag nanoparticles plasmon peak position?

Is the interaction between metallic nanoparticles (~ 20 nm) and light in the UV-Vis-NIR range governed by Mie theory or by Rayleigh scattering theory? Where are the Au and Ag plasmonic peaks located? ...
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473 views

Finding the direction of the magnetic force acting on a conducting wire

I have a problem in finding the direction of the force when a conducting wire is placed in a magnetic field. If I use Fleming's Right Hand rule I get a circular magnetic field, so what will be ...
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329 views

an example where changing the frame of reference of an observer changes the outcome of events!

consider two identical charges moving with uniform velocity. There will be a magnetic force of attraction between them as two currents in the same direction attract each other. If I sit on one of the ...
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102 views

Optical absorption in multilayer structure

Assume a hypothetical 3 media/ 1 layer structure with the following indices of refraction: $$n_1 = 2, n_2 = 2+i0.5, n_3 = 1$$ where the thickness of the layer is 100 nm and wavelength = 1000 nm. ...
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116 views

Are electric field lines due to Faradays law closed?

Are the field lines of electric field produced by Faraday's law of induction (and assuming $\rho = 0$) necessarily closed? If not what would be a counterexample. If it's true, how to prove it in ...
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156 views

How is the imaginary part of angular frequency omega related to the imaginary part of the refractive index?

I'm trying to find the attenuation constant (leak rate) $\alpha$ from the imaginary part of the refractive index of a lossy material. I have the eigen frequency $\omega$ for my structure which has an ...
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367 views

Why is the inner product between divergence-free current $\vec{J}$, and a gradient field$\nabla \varphi$ zero?

I read an article saying that the inner product between divergence-free current and a gradient field is zero. A divergence-free surface current is $\nabla\cdot\vec{J}=0$, and $\vec{J}$ could be ...
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221 views

Solving electromagnetic vector field using the Lagrangian

Given an action of the form \begin{equation}S=-\frac{1}{4}\int d^4x\eta^{\mu\nu}\eta^{\lambda\rho}F_{\mu\lambda}F_{\nu\rho}\end{equation} where ...
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212 views

Visualization of electromagnetic field [duplicate]

In the Wikipedia article about electromagnetic radiation one can find the following picture: But shouldn't the E and B field be 90$^\circ$ out of phase? In the depicted way the energy isn't ...
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1answer
194 views

Does the weight of a computer go up as information is added to it? [duplicate]

This probably sounds really naive. But, a strange discussion came up on Quora about computers possibly weighing more when information is added to them. I tried looking around but couldn't find a ...
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135 views

Gauge symmetry for p-forms

It is well known that the Lorentz invariance of the S-matrix implies gauge redundancy for 1-forms or 'photons'. Does this argument go through to $p$-forms? That is, does Lorentz invariance of the ...
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2answers
157 views

When to use which representation for an electric field

In class we covered three types of possibilities to evaluate the electric field for static problems. Unfortunately, most physics textbooks cover these ways without addressing the question of ...
3
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1answer
132 views

Solving non-linear ODE for divalent solution at a 1-D surface boudary

I am trying to solve the following equation for a positively charged plane with charge density $\sigma$ at $z = 0$. $$ \phi''(z)=-\frac{e}{\epsilon \epsilon_0} \big(z_+n_{+} e^{-\beta z_+ ...
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99 views

Associated Legendre Integer Giving Full Asimuthal Range and Physical Interpretation of $l(l+1)$

In separating the Laplacian in spherical coordinates, one arrives at the associated Legendre equation (ALE). Write the ALE as $$\frac{1}{\sin \theta} \frac{\partial }{\partial \theta}(\sin \theta ...
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304 views

Understanding Poynting's Theorem intuitively

I understand that, broadly speaking, Poynting's theorem is a statement of conservation of energy. Energy density of a volume of current and charge decreases proportionally to work done on charges ...
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1answer
86 views

The Energy involved in the work done here?

When a wire that has current $I$ flowing within it and its in a magnetic field, the wire experience the Lorentz force, and that force moved the wire over a certain distance $x$(no matter how small), ...
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586 views

Lorentz force, must there be two magnets?

The diagram above demonstrates the Lorentz force, Yet I wonder... must there be two magnets/electromagnets? If the two magnets form a magnetic field of $1$ $Tesla$ acting on the wire, why not use 1 ...
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553 views

How fast does it take to create a magnetic field in a solenoid?

If a solenoid/electromagnet has current flowing, it creates a magnetic field. Electricity is very very fast, I believe close to the speed of light? So, when power is given to a solenoid with $n$ ...
3
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1answer
82 views

Correct formula to express the potential generated by a single layer charge distribution

Assume that the closed surface $S$ encircles a volume $V$, and that a surface charge with density $\sigma$ ("single layer") is distributed over $S$. My question regards the electrostatic potential ...
3
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1answer
213 views

Polarization vector and bound charge

Why is it that the bound charge is $Q_b = - \oint_S{\mathbf{P} \cdot d\mathbf{S}}$? In particular, why is there a negative sign? Hayt's book on electromagnetism describes this as the "net increase in ...
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228 views

How to calculate the force acting on a magnet due to a solenoid

Can I assume both magnet and solenoid as magnetic dipole and use Coulombs law to find the force acting the magnet?
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3answers
236 views

Current density?

The current $i$ can be defined as: $$i = \int \vec{J} \dot{}d\vec{A} $$ where $\vec{J}$ is the current density and $d\vec{A}$ is the area vector. Is it possible for: $$i = \int \vec{J} ...
3
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1answer
4k views

Force from solenoid

I'd like to approximate the force from a solenoid, or at the very least find a formula which is proportional to the force so that I can experimentally find the constant for my particular case. ...
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2answers
247 views

Current Electricity and E.M.F of a cell

The E.M.F of a cell is the work done in moving a unit positive charge in a loop or from the terminal to the same terminal. The force it experiences is a conservative force. Therefore, the work-done in ...
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1answer
103 views

Physical distribution of salt anions and cations during electrophoresis

If I have a volume of $L$ liters of salt water at a concentration of $\approx N$ mM NaCl and I pour it into an electrophoretic apparatus (like this one: ). Once we turn the apparatus on, and set the ...
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3answers
205 views

Ferromagnets and magnets tend to align in the center. Why is that?

When you bring a large iron plate and a magnet, the magnet attracts the iron plate and it tends to slide itself to the center. When I place it on the edge, it always aligns at the center why is that?
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220 views

A dielectric sphere in an initially uniform electric field and representation theory of SO(3)

I learned recently that the highest order spherical harmonic required to represent the spatial distribution of decay products of a particle can be used to determine its spin, by using arguments ...
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188 views

Assumptions when calculating $\vec{B}$ using Ampère's (circuital) law

When considering the same setup as in this question, i.e. a straight, infinitely long wire carrying the current $I$, Ampère's circuital law $$\oint_C \vec{B} \cdot \mathrm{d}\vec{r} = \mu_0 ...
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Does a current-carrying wire running through the centre of a solenoid experience force?

Imagine looking at a solenoid from above. Current passing is through it in a clockwise direction. The direction of the field lines therefore is towards the bottom of the solenoid. Now pass a straight ...
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2answers
6k views

Do two magnets stacked on top of each other repel/attract stronger than just one magnet?

In designing a switch, I made it such that it "springs" back via two neodymium magnets (one in button repelling one in switch). I've found the magnets are too weak and don't spring back. I've resorted ...
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1answer
1k views

Axial forces on a solenoid windings

I understand that the windings in a solenoid experience a Lorentz force $\mathbf{f} = \mathbf{J} \times \mathbf{B}$, which tend to cause an outward pressure where $\mathbf{B}$ is directed along the ...