The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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58 views

Observing a photon during flight

When I was reading about the double-slit experiment in quantum mechanics, everything seems to make sense in terms of the waves and the interference pattern, but if thinking more about this ...
0
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2answers
41 views

Energy in conductors with $\vec{E}$-field

The question is deceptively simple. Suppose I have a uniform circular wire in which I have created the a E-field by some mean. We that without the source the electric field should not be there, so if ...
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0answers
5 views

What does magnetic flowmeters measure?

What parameter does the magnetic flowmeter actually measure? Velocity of the conducting liquid flowing through it or the amount of conducting liquid directly? The volume of liquid can be calculated ...
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0answers
19 views

What is direction of induced current in a rotating rod pivoted at one end in a magnetic field?

This is rod of length l, placed on metallic ring of the same radius as rod's length. This set up is placed in a magnetic field perpendicular to the rod and into the plane. It is very clear that an ...
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3answers
101 views

Can we say that gravity(indirectly) is responsible for motion of electrons around nucleus? [closed]

From Wikipedia But because general relativity dictates that the presence of electromagnetic fields (or energy/matter in general) induce curvature in spacetime From Wikipedia An ...
2
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1answer
59 views

When to use separation of variables in E&M? [closed]

I'd really like to know if there is a fast way to recognize if separation of variables is the most appropriate way to go about solving a problem. Are there any kind of guidelines for when to use ...
1
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1answer
58 views

Does a charged particle propagating in free space have a 'self-energy' like term due to it’s interaction with the fluctuations of the quantum vacuum? [closed]

Does a charged particle propagating in free space have a 'self-energy' like term due to it’s interaction with the fluctuations of the quantum vacuum? (particle-antiparticle pairs popping into and out ...
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2answers
39 views

An IE IRODOV Electrodynamics problem

A ring (radius R) is given a negative charge -q and at the centre a positive charge +q is kept. We have to calculate the electric field on the axis of the ring at a distance X from the centre. Take ...
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0answers
20 views

contactless force compatibility [closed]

When we use electromagnetic fields/waves to transfer data, we can make devices that are compatible and can communicate each other without interfering with other devices. Is it possible to make ...
0
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3answers
44 views

Rate of change of current in an Inductor

Considering an Inductor in a DC circuit: when the switch is first closed there is a change in current through the inductor, which induces an emf in the opposite direction (Lenz's Law). My question is ...
1
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1answer
109 views

Predicting path of light?(general relativity and electromagnetism)

In the first image we can see bending of light by gravity,in the second image I placed a big glass(it almost has zero weight) of considerable thickness near sun which will refract light coming ...
2
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0answers
15 views

Which part of a real Type II Superconductor magnetization loop represents the Meissner state?

So if we consider an ideal type II superconductor the magnetization should look like this The Meissner state is to be found between $0$ and $H_{c1}$ and the superconductor works as an ideal ...
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1answer
71 views

Why we unified electromagnetic and weak force?

We have unified electromagnetic and weak force into one single force called Electroweak force. I mean we can use these different forces within their respective domains like weak interaction for short ...
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3answers
57 views

Rate of Acceleration of an Object Pulled by Magnetic Force

Gravity on earth pulls objects toward it with an acceleration of 9.8 m/s/s on Earth until the object reaches it's max potential free fall speed. (I call this terminal velocity though I think that this ...
2
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1answer
39 views

How large or small can frequency in the EM spectrum get?

The largest frequency range is gamma rays, but does the EM spectrum 'stop' somewhere? Like is there a limit to how large a frequency can get? Or how small frequency can get? Is it one of those things ...
1
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0answers
22 views

Can I disperse a droplet with electromagnetic fields?

If I have a droplet of water, can I apply an electromagnetic field in order to disperse the droplet into smaller subdroplets (tiny vapor) and fill a space with them? The same way that magnetic dust ...
0
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0answers
21 views

How does permanent magnets attract each other if the $B$-field can do no work? [duplicate]

How can two permanent magnets do work on each other? If you put two magnets with opposite poles facing each other they will attract each other. If you put them with the same poles facing each other ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Using ion beam to create strong magnetic field

Consider, I want to make very strong magnetic field in some spot in space ( focus ) but I cannot put any solid material ( like metal conductor, or superconductor ) close to that spot (e.g. because ...
0
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2answers
82 views

Most fundamental quantity in magnetostatics and magnetodynamics [closed]

In both elctrostatics and electrodynamics, the electric charge is defined as the most fundamental quantity. What is the most fundamental quantity in case of magnetostatics and magnetodynamics ?
0
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1answer
32 views

Reflection of EM waves

In reflection of e m waves at the boundary, to show the reflected magnetic fields we put negative sign in the unit vector, example, if the B is along z direction we put (-k) in he reflected wave, ...
2
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0answers
34 views

Question about defining potential energy of a magnetic dipole placed in a magnetic field

We know that magnetic field is a non-conservative field, since it exists in closed loops. Then how can we define the potential energy of a magnetic dipole placed in a magnetic field ?
2
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1answer
33 views

Electron beam in magnetic field - increase or decrease the field?

When I fire an electron beam into homogenous magnetic field ( eg. inside Helmholtz coil ) it will bend into a circle => it will form a coil ( = current loop ) itself. The magnetic field created by ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Vector Potential As Electron Momentum Amplifier

Konopinski's "What the electromagnetic vector potential describes" (Gaussian dimension) equation (3): $\frac{d}{dt}[M\vec{v}+(q/c)\vec{A}]=-\nabla q[\phi-(\vec{v}/c)\cdot\vec{A}]$ contains a dot ...
1
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1answer
70 views

Is the photon's wave function the same as an electromagnetic wave(light)? [duplicate]

The first that i have been taught in Quantum Mechanics is the photoelectric phenomenon. Without analyzing it, it concludes that when we shine light at the circuit(roughly speaking), the work required ...
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0answers
28 views

Torque on a current carrying loop in non-uniform magnetic field

Does the formula $\mathbf{\tau = \mu\times B}$ work for a non-uniform magnetic field? Why? If not, how to calculate the torque on a current carrying loop placed in x-y plane, supposing the non ...
0
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1answer
11 views

Clarification needed:Projection Or Whole Length to be considered during integration

Sometimes in magnetism,electrostatics,friction problems when a force is acting over a curved we usually take the net projection of the curved path as the distance(to avoid integration).But it certain ...
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0answers
40 views

Finding the magnetic field due to a current carrying field at a point within the circumference

This is a question me and my friend were wondering about. How can one calculate the magnetic field due to a current carrying loop at a point in the area enclosed by the loop. For example, at point P ...
0
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0answers
11 views

Definition of self inductance of a coil

I saw a definition in a textbook for the term self-inductance of a coil as emf induced in a coil when rate of change of current is 1 ampere per second. But I think the following is correct: ratio of ...
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0answers
30 views

Wave propagation in micro strip waveguide

I am trying to understand wave propagation in micro-strip waveguide, the way i came to understand rectangular waveguide is this way (in brief): EM waves can be understood as reflecting from the ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Is there a Lagrangian that can lead to the Rayleigh-Jeans law?

Is there a way to derive the Rayleigh-Jean's law using classical statistical mechanics only? On the internet there is a common way to arrive at the equation by using concepts in electrodynamics. This ...
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0answers
23 views

Is it possible to change the direction or bend magnetic flux? [closed]

Is it possible to change the direction or bend the magnetic flux according to our wish? What i actually want to do is that if i have a horse-shoe magnet can i bend the magnetic flux which is running ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Two Current Carrying Loops: Multiple Choice Question

I'm studying some simple multiple choice questions from an old test in electrostatics and I have some trouble intuitively grasping this question. I hope someone can explain the solution! Two current ...
0
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2answers
79 views

Electromagnetic wave and quantum mechanics [duplicate]

I'm very new to physics. I studied and read about quantum mechanics and what the assumptions are (wave particle duality, uncertainty principle, observation, wave function collapse, etc.), but I also ...
1
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3answers
74 views

doubts regarding the classical electron radius

When estimating the classical electron radius, people normally equate the energy needed to assemble a charged sphere to $mc^2$, due to the so-called mass-energy relation. However, personally I don't ...
1
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1answer
19 views

What is the magnetic property of an alloy?

If an alloy is made between a diamagnetic and a paramagnetic substance or paramagnetic and a ferromagnetic substance or a diamagnetic and a ferromagnetic substance, what will be the resulting magnetic ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Electric field a distance z above the midpoint of a straight line segment

In Griffiths there's an example to evaluate the Electric field a distance z above the midpoint of a straight line segment of length 2L. Which carries a uniform charge $\lambda$. In that calculation, ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Voltage of a quadrupole magnet

I have a simple question and it's my first one in this community. :) Does the voltage of a quadrupole magnet depend on the power of the electron beam in a synchrotron? Perhaps someone has a good ...
1
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1answer
35 views

Magnetic field inside parallel plate capacitor

Inside a parallel plate capacitor, we know that the electric field due to the static charge $E= \frac{\epsilon_0 A}{d} $ Now if we want to find the magnetic field inside the parallel plate capacitor, ...
7
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1answer
105 views

Why do I hear voices when I touch my turntable needle?

So I was trying to figure out the reason why my old (and probably sufficiently damaged) needle on my phonograph (turntable) was not working like it was a little while ago. With my headphones on, I ...
0
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0answers
48 views

Are photons just electric waves in an electron's frame of reference?

They say that electrons emit photons when they jump to a lower orbit. But the way electrons should see it, there's no any emission, really. There's just rapid change in electric field due to a rapid ...
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0answers
40 views

Boundary conditions for Maxwell's equations at the interface between two media

Consider the following simple Maxwell's equations: $$ \nabla\cdot\mathrm{D}=\rho $$ $$ \nabla\times\mathrm{E}+i\omega\mathrm{B}=0 $$ $$ \nabla\cdot\mathrm{B}=0 $$ $$ ...
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0answers
7 views

Enough high&configured field disabling electron avalanche?

The electron avalanche starts after sufficient high electric field through the hole where one electron is, often >300keV. However, I seem to be getting results, that at some energy instances of the ...
1
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1answer
81 views

Magnetic force paradox

Suppose a current carrying wire Is placed in vertical direction. A charged rod is placed is placed nearly horizontally.It is clear that magnetic field due to current carrying wire is inside the ...
0
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0answers
9 views

Net electric field of a nanowire in the vicinity of a quantumdot

I know how to find the electric field when both nanostructures are same and in the vicinity of each other. However, when it comes to nanostructures of different dimentionality (ie.nanowire and a ...
-1
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1answer
17 views

In magnetostatics, is there any relation between flux and current?

I have noted while trying to find analogy between electrostatics and magnetostatics, for the equation, flux = charge/epsilon, is there any corresponding equation in magnetostatics, relating magnetic ...
0
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0answers
10 views

Is the shear force required to separate two magnets different than the pull force?

I'm building something for a side project for fun =) Essentially, (simplified) Ill have a user standing on a metal platform. There is a robot placed beneath the floor. The robot moves the metal ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Eddy Currents – Tubes with slits

When a magnet falls down a tube, eddy currents form and flow around the tube, perpendicular to the direction in which the magnet falls. However, when there is a vertical slit in the tube, are ...
-1
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1answer
44 views

Reproducing electricity [closed]

We all know reproducing solar energy is possible. Same stands for mechanical energy (air, water, coals) - they are all reproducible. But what about other types of light ? A diode light for example ...
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2answers
32 views

Difference between steady and moving electrons

Recently I am reading about the elecctromagnetism. When the electrons are at rest, they produce electric field and when in motion they produce magnetic field. Why so? What happens to a electron when ...
1
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1answer
28 views

what is the meaning of “x dB of isolation” for Faraday cage box?

I need a Faraday-cage box that block the device from transmitting or receiving any signals when it is in it. When I search for such a box I always see the companies that are making describe it is ...