The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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16
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9answers
1k views

Why don't photons split up into multiple lower energy versions of themselves?

A photon could spontaneously split up into two or more versions of itself and all the conservation laws I'm aware of would not be violated by this process. (I think.) I've given this some thought, and ...
-1
votes
0answers
7 views

What will shield Ultrasonic Frequencies between 40khz to 16 kHz even down to 1 kHz?

What can shield against a ULTRASONIC weapon the kind that is used to fend off pirate ships? Thanks.
-3
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0answers
41 views

Why does the Microwave disturb the Internet Signal?

I have no back round in physics but was wondering how come every time the microwave is turned on, the internet slows down dramatically?
1
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1answer
134 views

Nature Of Bulb Glowing In Parallel LR circuit with bulbs

In the given circuit the switch is initially closed and then opened after some considerable time.Then which bulb will stop glowing first? Which bulb will glow more brightly?Why ? .After opening ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

If electromagnetic fields give charge to particles, do photons carry charge?

As I understand these two statements: An electromagnetic field gives particles charge A photon is a quantum of electromagnetic field It must mean that a photon carries charge. But I guess it isn't ...
9
votes
3answers
3k views

Do protons exchange photons with electrons?

I'm sorry for this question but, I just don't get it. According to the electromagnetic field theory, electrons repel each other by exchanging photons. How do protons attract electrons, by photon ...
4
votes
4answers
181 views

Is there any electric current in a continuous medium of moving charges?

Consider a continuous charged fluid (unlike in real life where charge is carried in discrete chunks like electrons) in a bottle. Suppose that the fluid is stirred in a circular manner and then left to ...
10
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1answer
196 views

Is the uniqueness theorem correct in superconductivity?

There is an uniqueness theorem in electromagnetism. It says that the solution of Maxwell's Equations is determined uniquely by boundary conditions. We can treat superconductivity as a completely ...
4
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3answers
5k views

Electric field and electric potential of a point charge in 2D and 1D

in 3D, electric field of a piont charge is inversely proportional to the square of distance while the potential is inversely proportional to distance. We can derive it from Coulomb's law. however, I ...
0
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0answers
15 views

Landau Diamagnetism and Pauli paramagnetism

In the conventional definition of Landau's diamagnetism we ignore the effect of spin-electron coupling and vice versa for the derivation of Pauli's paramagnetism. I want to know what would happen if ...
-3
votes
0answers
22 views

Transformer primary and secondary coil current problem [on hold]

A step up transformer has 300 turns on its primary coil and 90,000 turns on its secondary coil. The potential difference of the generator to which the primary circuit is attached if 60 V. The ...
1
vote
2answers
711 views

How is the current flow perpendicular to the wire?

This answer gives a great explanation of how surface charge builds up to force the current to move perpendicular to the wire: http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/102936/41086 However, it fails to ...
4
votes
1answer
509 views

Question about superconductivity

A long cylinder of radius $R$ is made from two different material. Its radius $r<r_0$ $(r_0<R)$ part is a material with superconducting transition temperature $T_1$, and its $r_0<r<R$ ...
26
votes
3answers
954 views

Do intergalactic magnetic fields imply an Open Universe?

According to a paper on the arXiv (now published in Phys Rev D), they do. How credible is this result? The abstract says: The detection of magnetic fields at high redshifts, and in empty ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

A puzzler in induction and special relativity

Some reading I was doing jogged my memory about a puzzle in E&M that hit me back in my undergrad days, but I just let it go at the time and never found an answer. A pretty common undergrad E&...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

What is a magnetic line of force?

Do magnetic limes of force 'flow'? If so, what is it that is flowing? What is the 'line of force' composed of?
0
votes
3answers
243 views

Dielectric boundary

I am trying to determine why electric field may be confined to a certain region if there is a large difference in the permitivity for example if electric field flows through water and then reaches a ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Why do we restrict to electric field when describing light?

Why do we restrict only to electric field when describing light as electromagnetic wave? I mean from Maxwell equations we can derive wave equation for electric field and also for magnetic field but ...
3
votes
0answers
43 views

Lagrangian of classical electromagnetism without $A_{\mu}$ field [duplicate]

Is there a Lagrangian reproducing Maxwell's equations without the use of the scalar and vector potential? Obviously $\mathcal{L} = -\frac14F_{\mu \nu}F^{\mu \nu}$ doesn't work since in terms of $E$ ...
7
votes
4answers
824 views

Least-action classical electrodynamics without potentials

Is it possible to formulate classical electrodynamics (in the sense of deriving Maxwell's equations) from a least-action principle, without the use of potentials? That is, is there a lagrangian which ...
7
votes
1answer
239 views

Are magnetic hysteresis losses relevant to alternating currents flowing in a wire?

Say we have an AC in a magnetically lossy material, like iron. Because of iron's relatively high permeability, skin effect will be more pronounced than it is in say, copper, so this iron wire isn't so ...
0
votes
2answers
178 views

Does Faraday's law work both ways, and if so why don't we use d.c for a generator?

Faraday's law in the integral form can be stated as $V = -d\Phi/dt$, where the right-hand side represents the rate of change of the magnetic flux and the left the voltage difference. In other words, a ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

What is capacitance, in general?

In circuit analysis software capacitance can be measured between any two nodes of a circuit or of a multiterminal device. In practical terms we take $C_{ij}$, the capacitance between $i$ and $j$ as ...
1
vote
2answers
753 views

How does the magnetic field get induced in car's tire?

I was amazed to see how my car's tire started attracting the nuts and bolts, how in the world did it induce the magnetic field? Never heard of such phenomena!!!
6
votes
3answers
194 views

Far field diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the Fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Does gravitational radiation have a formalism similar to Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics?

Binary systems radiate energy away in gravitational waves as the orbits of the two masses spiral in towards each other. My understanding of gravity is that we think of it as a mediator of particle-...
4
votes
1answer
241 views

What is problematic about the Moving magnet and conductor problem?

The problem is posed as follows: There is a conductor and a magnet in relative motion. This motion induces emf in the conductor. The value of the induced emf is independent of whether it's the ...
3
votes
2answers
123 views

Proton and electron joining

If I have a proton and an electron at rest at some distance apart. Will they form an hydrogen atom when released or they will join together? My intuition says it will form H atom. But I cannot ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

How can a sinusoid be a steady current? [duplicate]

As far as I understand it, a steady/stationary/constant current is defined to have $dJ/dt=0$ (i.e., no explicit time dependence). So I would say that sinusoids cannot produce steady currents, yet ...
2
votes
1answer
407 views

Right hand solenoid example

I am just studying for my physics final exam. I came across this example and am not satisfied with the answer. My answer is that Z is South and the current would flow from Y to X because of the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Electric field from conductive to dielectric media

I am interested in the main difference between transitions from electric fields from Conductive to Conductive/ Dielectric to Dielectric and Dielectric/Conductive media. What are the boundary ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

What one would observe on extremely high voltages?

I am interested which physical processes generate the highest electrical voltage and what the highest measured voltage is. In everyday life, electrostatic charges e.g. while walking with socks on a ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Newton's third law, weak and strong law of action and reaction [duplicate]

In the case of a system of moving charges forces between charges is obtained by Biot-Savart law. But it violates both action and reaction law. How can we prove that?
0
votes
0answers
26 views

What difference does it make if the turns in a tesla coil overlap?

Would a tesla coil in which the primary coil is made by overlapping the turns of the wire work?
27
votes
3answers
4k views

What is momentum really?

Wikipedia defines momentum as in classical mechanics: In classical mechanics, linear momentum or translational momentum is the product of the mass and velocity of an object. However, an ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Intuition differential ampere's law

Ampere's differential law states that - $$\nabla \times {\bf B} = \frac{4 \pi \, {\bf J}}{c}$$ I know to derive amperes integral form from special relativity, and to use stokes theorem in order to ...
5
votes
2answers
231 views

Path dependent phase in quantum mechanics

In elementary treatments of quantum mechanics, we are taught that the wavefunction of a single particle is complex valued ($\Psi : \mathbb{R}^3 \to \mathbb{C}$). In particular, the wavefunction has a ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Laser as an optical oscillator

How can Laser can be compared to a positive feedback amplifier? Does the two conditions for oscillator holds good for lasers too.
2
votes
1answer
129 views

What is the metric of a constant electromagnetic (pure electric or pure magnetic) field?

For example, imagine a magnetic field $B_x$ directing in $\hat{x}$ direction filling all the space. What is its associated metric field? I can construct the electromagnetic stress-energy tensor for ...
0
votes
1answer
425 views

What are the boundary conditions for EM waves normally incident on the interface between two dielectric media?

An EM wave, amplitude $E_0$, frequency $\omega_0$, is incident upon a material with relative permittivity (dielectric function) $$\varepsilon \left( z \right) = \left\{ \begin{gathered}{\varepsilon ...
2
votes
1answer
127 views

How force get transmitted when a magnet attracts iron?

According to particle physics , every fundamental force has its force carrier particle. Photon is a force carrier particle of electromagnetic force but how does force gets transmitted when a iron is ...
2
votes
1answer
211 views

Opacity/transparency of conductive meshes to charged particles (electrons/ions)

When using a conductive (metal) mesh, effectively a metallic woven fabric, in vacuum applications as a "grid" for charged particle optics, how does one calculate (or at least estimate) the opacity or ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

How to find the magnetic field due to a revolving electron of hydrogen atom in first orbit

So, I was thinking about the Bohr model of atom and I started to wonder how we could find the magnetic field due to a revolving electron (produced at the location of proton) of hydrogen atom in first ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Circuit with capacitor and battery- why same voltage?

If we connect a capacitor and a battery in the same circuit, what makes the charge move until the voltage on the capacitor is the same as voltage on battery?
1
vote
2answers
141 views

How to find the parts across which emf is induced?

Is there a general rule that will allow one to find the parts where the emf is induced? Consider for example the following two cases: Case 1: A rod is made to move normally to the magnetic field at ...
4
votes
1answer
96 views

Is it possible to push together two charged particles of the same charge hard enough so it becomes a black hole?

My chain of thought is the following: To push together two charges of the same sign you need to do work. The energy spent will be turned into electrostatic potential energy. Can we pump so much ...
7
votes
2answers
87 views

Two charged black holes in equilibrium

Consider a pair of (possibly rotating) charged black holes with masses m1, m2 and like charges q1, q2. It seems that under certain conditions gravitational attraction should exactly cancel ...