3
votes
2answers
130 views

Which solution to the electromagnetic wave equation is the most accurate model of monochromatic light?

When a photon is modeled as a monochromatic electromagnetic wave its electric and magnetic components are usually taken to be sine waves (for example here ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

Is polarization of a wave just a description of its motion in three dimensions?

Since a polarization of the wave is described by complex numbers, we can try to give that mathematical formalism geometrical meaning. With having two different axes, one imaginary and other real, it ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Why doesn't the magnetic field polarize when polarizing light?

If the magnetic field doesn't polarize does it follow the electric field path of propagation? or does it vanish?
3
votes
2answers
66 views

Locations of destructive interference for two spherical waves

I have looked at this, but it did not help with locations. Really this just comes down to mathematical manipulation, which for some reason I fail to see. Here is my paraphrased setup: Consider two ...
6
votes
0answers
74 views

Is the existence of electromagnetic standing waves dependent on the observers reference frame?

If I take two plane EM waves travelling in opposite direction e.g. $E = E_0 \sin(kx-\omega t)$ and $E=E_o \sin (kx + \omega t)$, they sum to give a standing wave with a time-averaged Poynting vector ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

How could electromagnetic waves propagate through space although they have no electrons?

How could electric fields in these waves propagate through space although in space there's no electrons for the electric field to be formed? is there another type of charged particles that carry the ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Does the transmission axis matter for sending polarized light through polarized glass?

If I have polarized light and I send through only one polarized glass plane, does the transmission axis matter, or will the intensity be halved no matter what.
0
votes
3answers
198 views

Prove EM Waves Are Transverse In Nature

Why we say that EM waves are transverse in nature? I have seen some proofs regarding my question but they all calculate flux through imaginary cube. Here is My REAL problem that I can't here imagine ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Conduction and propagation

What is the difference between conduction of electric wave in conductor and propagation of electromagnetic wave in dielectric? Why propagation term is used for dielectric and conduction for ...
2
votes
2answers
78 views

Suppose a light wave with wavelength 3m. What happens if one tries to contain that wave within a 1m container?

Suppose a light wave with wavelength 3m. What happens if one tries to contain that wave within a 1m container? If I'm going about this entirely the wrong way or have wrong conceptions about light ...
1
vote
0answers
67 views

Dispersion relation for TE and TM waves in general anisotropic medium

I want to calculate the dispersion relation (the relation between $\bf k$ and permittivity and permeability tensors and $\omega$) for a TE and a TM wave with wave vector $\mathbf k=k_x\mathbf {\hat ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What does non magnetic and nonconducting mean in reflection and transmission of waves?

So, we were ask to consider the Fresnel Equations for parallel and perpendicular waves (with index of refractions). Then, we are ask to prove some equations in which "... for nonmagnetic ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

electron spin separation

I am having doubt whether the electron's up spin moment and down spin moment can be isolated from one another. If it got separated, will each moment acts as magnetic monopole (stable or unstable). ...
1
vote
2answers
146 views

Why do waves diffract?

There have already been a lot of questions on this site on diffraction but I still believe this one might be slightly different. In electromagnetic waves, diffraction and any other phenomenon of wave ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Diffraction from interatomic spacing

In diffraction from a single slit, we learn that the angular width of the central maxima, is given by $2\sin^{-1}\frac \lambda d$. For $d\approx \lambda$, the incoming wavefront should be spread to ...
3
votes
1answer
99 views

Why does a light wave invert at a boundary with greater index of refraction?

Is there a reason why a EM wave reflects invertedly when it meets a boundary point with a greater index of refraction. In the case of ropes, if remember correctly, the reason why it inverts is to ...
1
vote
2answers
185 views

A difference between Plane Wave and Collimated?

Collimation is clearly in reference to ray($\vec{k}_{xy}$ vector) orientation unlike waterfront continuity( $\phi_{xy}$ phase shift) described by plane-wave. Not to say that one is not directly ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Is the sum of the amplitudes of an electromagnetic wave always 1?

It's been a while, and I'm trying to verify my understanding. I remember reasoning (but never being taught) that the sum of the (normalized) electric and magnetic waves in a single electromagnetic ...
0
votes
3answers
204 views

How do EM waves propogate?

I have read about this and what i seem to know is that when charged particles such as electron accelerate they produce time-varying electric fields. These E-fields produce H-fields and the process ...
0
votes
0answers
60 views

Boundary conditions for 2D helical waveguide

I'm interested in looking at standing wave solutions for the wave equation on a 2D annulus, with the twist that the annulus is "streched" in to a helix in 3D, but so that the rings themselves are ...
0
votes
1answer
237 views

Deriving the group velocity of a wave produced by some basic cosine waves with unequal amplitudes

Consider some basic cosine waves of the form ${E_i} = {E_0}\cos ({\omega _i}t - {k_i}z)$ with different amplitudes, frequencies and phases. We know a combination of such waves could result in a wave ...
2
votes
2answers
131 views

How do waves meet at a single point?

In principle two objects can never meet,because of electromagnetic repulsions for example if I touch something, I am not actually touching it considering the fact that there is a small region left due ...
3
votes
2answers
341 views

Do Electromagnetic Waves really propagate through continuous Induction?

I've often seen it said that in an Electromagnetic Wave the changing Electric Field component creates the Magnetic Field Component and the changing Magnetic Field Component in turn creates an Electric ...
2
votes
1answer
195 views

Isn't the front edge of a wave, kind of “information” which travels faster than light?

Considering the definition of phase and group velocities, We know group velocity can't exceed C but phase velocity can be infinitely high. Assume a monochromatic electromagnetic wave traveling with a ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Relation between the spin of a particle and the polarization of it's wave

Is there any intrinsic relation between the spin of a particle, and the degree of freedom of it's polarization? does it holds for any particle-wave couple? like EM-photon, ...
1
vote
1answer
314 views

General solution to the Helmholtz wave equation with complex-valued frequency in cylinderical coordinates

The Helmholtz equation is expressed as $$\nabla^2 \psi + \lambda \psi = 0$$. This equation occurs, for eg., after taking the Fourier transform (with respect to the time coordinate) of the wave ...
1
vote
1answer
125 views

Reflection, transmission, absorption…how to calculate them?

I was wondering whether there is an equation that enables me to calculate the reflection, transmission, absorption and polarization, when the electric field everywhere is given? Consider this: You ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

I've been reading that it's possible to create a “mostly magnetic” wave, and I have a few questions

Would it be possible with the "mostly magnetic wave" to have it behave in such a way that it would be undetectable by radio triangulation? I read about the monument at the CIA headquarters that was ...
0
votes
2answers
597 views

Electromagnetic wave propagation through two lossless dielectrics

In Elements of Electromagnetics (Sadiku, 3rd edition, Section 10.8), the author says to consider two lossless dielectric materials joined at an interface $z=0$. Here two lossless dielectric materials ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Phasor representation of voltage in frequency domain

In a text on application of electromagnetism in transmission line, there introduces a phasor for the voltage (in frequency domain) $$\tilde{V}(x) = V^+e^{-i\beta x} + V^-e^{i\beta x.}$$ Here $V^+$ ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

EM Waves Energy Loss

Where does the energy go when two photons interfere destructively at a point on a screen in Young's double slit experiment ?
1
vote
0answers
119 views

Fourier Transform of ribbon's beam Electric Field

I have a monochromatic ribbon beam with $E(x)e^{i(kz-\omega t)}$ being the electric field's amplitude. I want to show that the lowest order approximation in terms of plane waves is ...
1
vote
1answer
331 views

Power radiated by the sun at different locations

I am wondering can someone help to solve second part which extends first part; The power radiated by the sun is ${3.9*10^{26}}_{watt}$. The earth orbits the sun in a nearly circular orbit of radius ...
0
votes
1answer
276 views

Eddy current losses in electric steel by harmonics of a magnetic field

I am working on an model of a permanent magnet synchronous machine. Right now I am stuck with calculating the eddy current losses caused by the harmonics of the stator magnetic field in the electrical ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

what is the difference between constant and changing magnetic and electric fields? How do they occur? How do they form an electromagnetic wave?

what is the difference between constant and changing magnetic and electric fields? How do they occur? How do they form an electromagnetic wave?
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Why are AC quantities represented by sine waves always?

Usually we use a sinusoidal wave form to represent a alternating quantity. Why not a cosinusoidal wave or a ramp wave form? In sine wave forms we can indicate the maximum and minimum amplitude and ...
0
votes
1answer
175 views

Wavefronts and phase velocity faster than $c$

Lets assume we have parallel wavefronts in a glass of water: and we put an inclined rod on the water surface: related to a very small inclining, Vy velocity is greater or much greater then Vx ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

What is the history behind the factors of 3 in the classification of electromagnetic radiation?

What is the history behind the factors of 3 in the classification of electromagnetic radiation? See e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_spectrum#By_frequency Is this (just) inherited from the ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

How do mirrors work?

Apparently, light is just a certain wavelength, or "the visible spectrum" of electromagnetic waves. If I recall correctly, my physics teacher explained to me that electromagnetic waves are basically ...
13
votes
4answers
8k views

Phase shift of 180 degrees on reflection from optically denser medium

Can anyone please provide an intuitive explanation of why phase shift of 180 degrees occurs in the Electric Field of a EM wave,when reflected from an optically denser medium? I tried searching for it ...
-1
votes
2answers
263 views

Why do you get electric field of a light wave?

Why do you get electric field of a light wave in following form: $E(x,t)=A cos(kx-\omega t- \theta)$?( look at: https://public.me.com/ricktrebino -> OpticsI-02-Waves-Fields.ppt, p. 18)
1
vote
1answer
171 views

Relationship between gauss and decibels

In my ongoing effort to understand the world around me, I want to wrap my head around the relationships between two units of measure. Specifically gauss and decibels. The quandary comes from my ...
9
votes
5answers
744 views

Superposition of electromagnetic waves

The superposition of two waves is given by $$\sin(\omega_1 t)+\sin(\omega_2 t)=2\cos\left(\frac{\omega_1-\omega_2}{2}t\right)\sin\left(\frac{\omega_1+\omega_2}{2}t\right).$$ For sound waves, this ...
10
votes
8answers
3k views

Why no longitudinal electromagnetic waves?

According to wikipedia and other sources, there are no longitudinal electromagnetic waves in free space. I'm wondering why not. Consider an oscillating charged particle as a source of EM waves. Say ...
1
vote
1answer
336 views

Is there orbital angular momentum for all particles?

Light as an electromagnetic wave can be polarized in different ways, e.g. linear or circular. As far as I understand it currently this can be compared to the spin direction of a propagation electron ...
3
votes
1answer
198 views

Electric field Fourier decomposition

I have the following decomposition for the electric component of light: $$\renewcommand{\vec}[1]{\mathbf{#1}}\vec{E}(\vec r)=\frac1{4\pi^2} \iint_\Omega \vec A(k_x, k_y) \mathrm{e}^{i \vec{k} \cdot ...
0
votes
0answers
159 views

What is the electric field part of an EM wave? Radiation field or the induction field?

Look at this image: I wonder if the electric field is from the induction field from a vibrating electron or the radiation field? If it is from the radiation field, as I suppose, than can someone ...
5
votes
1answer
557 views

How does a speaker produce sound?

What I read is that a speaker produces sound by the movement of a coil attached to a cone which moves back and forth. So, If I try to move the coil by hand, would it produce sound? If not, why? or Why ...
2
votes
3answers
586 views

Electromagnetic wave reflection vs. light reflection

Related: x-ray interaction with atmosphere I know that electromagnetic waves of particular frequencies reflect from the ionosphere. And the light (which from one perspective is an electromagnetic ...
3
votes
2answers
795 views

Energy in an EM wave should depend on frequency

I just finished reading Feynman's Lectures on Physics vol.I, ยง34-9: "The momentum of light". The author explains that there is a relation between the wave 4-vector $k^{\mu}$ and the energy-momentum ...