1
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1answer
29 views

Repulsion and attraction of electric currents

Now, I understand that when a an electron travels, it creates a magnetic field. If you put two wires with current traveling in the same direction they repel, and current traveling in opposite ...
1
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0answers
72 views

Why does Coulomb's law not hold for fast moving charges?

We all remember calculating the electric force of interaction between a stationary nucleus and a revolving electron using Coulomb's law. The electron in this case is moving. Here's what I think about ...
7
votes
2answers
386 views

Special relativity and electromagnets

This Veritasium video explains how electromagnets can be explained by special relativity, and how the magnetic field surrounding a current-carrying wire can also be viewed as an electric field, if ...
1
vote
3answers
57 views

Arguments for finite speed of physical processes

When beginning a study of the special theory of relativity, one discovers that the theory of special relativity has as an axiom that the laws of physics are invariant with respect to transformations ...
1
vote
0answers
95 views

A question on an exercise from Gravitation by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler

My question is on problem 4.1 of Gravitation. In a generic case of electric field and magnetic field(i.e not $E=0$ or $B=0$ or $E$ and $B$ perpendicular), define the direction $\hat{n}$ unit vector , ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Explain polarization in RF in which the conductor is stationary

Consider a metal rod parallel to $x$-axis moving with velocity $\vec v =(0,v,0)$ perpendicular to magnetic field $\vec B=(0,0,B)$. Lorentz force will give rise to the electric field $\vec E = - ...
2
votes
0answers
56 views

One question about derivation of Maxwell equations

I saw the following way of derivation of Maxwell equations: author starts from Lorentz transformations for the 3-vector of force, then he applies them for the Coulomb law, after that gets the Lorentz ...
4
votes
2answers
202 views

How do I actually calculate the Lorentz transformation of a field strength tensor

Say now I have an arbitrary field strength tensor $F$, and I want to boost it according to a Lorentz transformation matrix $(\Lambda)$ The transformation is given by $$ F^{'\mu \nu} = ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Tensor decomposition of $\partial_\mu A_\nu$

In the decomposition of a rank-2 Minkowski tensor into irreducible representations, I expect the 16 components of the tensor product $M_\mu N_\nu$ to reduce to the sum of a scalar (1), a rank-2 ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

Field interaction betweeen two point charges?

[SOLVED] Consider two particles A and B having equal charges and placed at some distance. The particle A is slightly displaced towards B.So, Does the EM force on B increase(+/-) as soon as the ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Proof that 4-potential exists from Gauss-Faraday field equation

This is a problem concerning covariant formulation of electromagnetism. Given $$\partial^{[\alpha} F^{\beta\gamma]}= 0 $$ how does one prove that $F$ can be obtained from a 4-potential $A$ such ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Electric field generated by a point charge moving at the speed of light

As you see, this is the electric field generated by a point charge moving at constant speed v. I know that when $v$ -> 0, $E$ is just the Coloumb Law. But how do you interpret $E$ when $v$ -> $c$ ? ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Deriving the relativistic Larmor equation

I have derived the Larmor equation as $$P = \frac{q^2}{6\pi \epsilon_0 c^3} |\ddot{r}|^2.$$ How do I make this relativistic? Apparently, I have to consider the acceleration parallel and ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Realtivistic explanation of forces between two conducting wires

The formula for the force between two infinite conducting wires per unit of length, $F_l = \frac{\mu_0}{2\pi} \frac{I_1 I_2}{r}$, is quite well known. It was used for definition of ampere and was ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

Energy-Momentum Tensor under Lorentz Transformation

In relativity, the symmetric energy-momentum tensor is given by $$ T^{ij}, $$ where $T^{00}$ is the energy density and $\frac{1}{c}T^{10}$ is the momentum density. Thus: $$ \left(\frac{1}{c}T^{00}dV, ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Lorentz transformation of electromagnetic 4-potential

I'm looking for the exact correspondence between Lorentz transfer four vector and the four vector of scalar and vector potential $A^\mu = (\phi(t,\vec{x}),\vec{A}(t,\vec{x}))^{T}$. Does $ct=A(t), ...
3
votes
2answers
330 views

Uncertainty of permittivity of vacuum [duplicate]

Question: The value of permittivity of vacuum, $\epsilon_0$, is given with absolutely no uncertainty in NIST Why is this the case? More details: The permeability of vacuum can be given by ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Electric Magnetic potential and Lorentz transform [closed]

I have heard that the scalar potential and the magnetic vector potential in the electromagnetic four potential become the four vector by the Lorentz transform. Thereafter, the Lorentz transform leads ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Electromagnetism and the principle of relativity

I'm reading the book "Fundamental Physics 2: Electromagnetism" by Alonso and Finn. I understand everything up to the point where everything is "unified". The following example is given in the book: ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

What is the resolution to this apparent contradiction?

Momentum is defined as $$p = \gamma m_0 v$$ And here is another law $$E^2=(m_0c^2)^2+(pc)^2$$ And this website says the energy of a red photon is $1.9074 eV$. Also, light has a rest mass of $0$. The ...
2
votes
2answers
115 views

Why is the Faraday Tensor derived from the Lorentz force?

If we start from the Lorentz force, $$\textbf{F}=q\textbf{E} +q\textbf{v}\times\textbf{B}$$ and use the four velocity u$^{\mu}$ and the four momentum p$^{\nu}$, then we get to ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Electron distribution around atom when moving

I do not have much experience on this but if an atom has some electrons around nucleus and the atom itself it is moving at some speed does that affect the distribution of electrons around? I am ...
6
votes
1answer
163 views

Is the existence of electromagnetic standing waves dependent on the observers reference frame?

If I take two plane EM waves travelling in opposite direction e.g. $E = E_0 \sin(kx-\omega t)$ and $E=E_o \sin (kx + \omega t)$, they sum to give a standing wave with a time-averaged Poynting vector ...
2
votes
2answers
93 views

Magnetism due to relativity?

So I have been reading in some books that magnetism does not have to be assumed a priori, but can be obtained from the electric field + special relativity. And I have seen how this leads to the common ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

Special relativity: moving charge and twisting bar magnet

ETA: Huh. It's been more than three months since I posed this question. Is it really possible that no one knows the answer? I thought for sure someone would know. Oh well. You have a small bar ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

All possible electromagnetic Lorentz invariants that can be built into the electromagnetic Lagrangian?

Given the electromagnetic Lagrangian density $$ \mathcal{L}~=~-\frac{1}{4}F_{\mu\nu}F^{\mu\nu}~=~\frac{1}{2}(E^2-B^2) $$ is a Lorentz invariant, how many other electromagnetic invariants exists that ...
7
votes
5answers
434 views

Is there a fourth component to the electric field and magnetic field?

The Question If the three vector electric and magnetic fields come from the four component four-potential, then is there a fourth component to the electric and magnetic field? Related Question I ...
4
votes
2answers
241 views

Reason why $F^{\mu\nu}F_{\mu\nu}$ and $\tilde{F}_{\mu\nu}F^{\mu\nu}$ are Lorentz invariant

I'm trying to think of an intuitive reasoning for why $F^{\mu\nu}F_{\mu\nu}$ and $\tilde{F}_{\mu\nu}F^{\mu\nu}$ are Lorentz invariant. By this I mean that I don't simply want to show that they remain ...
2
votes
0answers
127 views

Huggins Displacement Theory and Retrocausality

I was looking at the Wikipedia entries on Time Travel and the Grandfather paradox and noticed a paragraph on the so-called Huggins Displacement Theory. I haven't been able to find the source although ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

How to interpret Lenz's law in STR?

By the Lenz's law, when a charged particle goes through a coil it generates a magnetic field. This field generates a current in the coil, slowing down the particle. But by Special Relativity (STR), ...
5
votes
1answer
109 views

Is this a valid proof that the four-current is conserved?

The four-current of a particle moving along a worldine $X^\nu(s)$ is defined as $$j^\mu(x^\nu) = ec \int u^\mu(s)\, \delta^4(x^\nu - X^\nu(s)) \, ds$$ So here's my proof that this is conserved: ...
1
vote
1answer
384 views

Proving Lorentz invariance of Maxwell equations

I've read somewhere that one does not need to prove Lorentz invariance of the Maxwell equations $F_{\mu\nu,\sigma}+F_{\nu\sigma,\mu}+F_{\sigma\mu,\nu}=0$ because it is "manifestly Lorentz invariant" ...
0
votes
2answers
123 views

Electric charge is lorentz invariant

I know that electric charge is lorentz invariant quantity and I can easily think of experiment to check that. Is a though experiment that can prove that also?
2
votes
0answers
58 views

Hidden momentum

I'm trying to learn about hidden momentum. After reading what I could find with a google search, I understand that it is equal to the momentum carried by radiation, calculated with the Poynting ...
-1
votes
1answer
54 views

Energy of electron accelerated by a magnet

In the YouTube video Monster magnet meets computer, the south pole of a 1 T (roughly) neodymium magnet is held in front of a CRT. Assuming the CRT produces electrons of 30 keV, and that the screen is ...
1
vote
1answer
446 views

Deriving the Electromagnetic Tensor

The electromagnetic tensor is given as: How do you derive this? And how come there is a partial derivative in front of $A_\mu$? Do you multiply the derivatives or what?
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Su­per­lu­mi­nal in­ter­ac­tions

The fact that photons emitted from an electric-dipole active atom cannot be spatially localized better than to the near-field zone of the atom is seen as the origin of genuine superluminality. ...
12
votes
3answers
591 views

Fundamental invariants of the electromagnetic field

It is a standard exercise in relativistic electrodynamics to show that the electromagnetic field tensor $F_{\mu\nu}$, whose components equal the electric $E^i=cF^{i0}$ and magnetic ...
3
votes
2answers
226 views

The signature of the metric and the definition of the electromagnetic tensor

I've read the definition of the electromagnetic field tensor to be ...
7
votes
3answers
907 views

Maxwell's Equations using Differential Forms

Maxwell's Equations written with usual vector calculus are $$\nabla \cdot E=\rho/\epsilon_0 \qquad \nabla \cdot B=0$$ $$\nabla\times E=-\dfrac{\partial B}{\partial t} \qquad\nabla\times ...
1
vote
0answers
115 views

Non-zero charge density due to Lorentz contraction in current carrying wires

In trying to answer this question I came across the following problem. The original question relates to the idea that what looks like a magnetic field in one reference frame, ends up as an ...
8
votes
2answers
389 views

current in wire + special relativity = magnetism

Current in wire + moving charge next to wire creates magnetic force in the stationary reference frame OR electric force in the moving reference frame from special relativity due to change in charge ...
0
votes
0answers
60 views

What is the relation between retarded potential and the Lorentz transformation of EM fields?

In Griffiths' ED book he derives the field of a moving charge by two ways: LW retarded potential. Lorentz transformation of EM fields. (eq10.68 and eq12.92 and the discussion that follows,3rd ...
4
votes
2answers
306 views

The relation between electric field and magnetic potential

In every electrodynamics book there is one chapter on special relativity which includes one section about" covariant formulation of electrodynamics" which uses tensor to describe the two fields and ...
4
votes
1answer
285 views

Galilean invariance of a subset of Maxwell equations

I read in Feynman's proof of Maxwell equations the statement that the subset of Maxwell equations comming from the Bianchi identity: $$ \nabla \cdot {\bf B} = 0, \quad \nabla \times {\bf E} + ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Magnetic induction in Relativity

As we know magnetic phenomenon is a mere relativistic effect.My question is how to explain the magnetic induction in a relativistic manner?
0
votes
1answer
156 views

Classically, how can an electron orbiting a proton radiate given its relativistic energy

In classical relativistic Electrodynamics, we are often told that any accelerating point charge inherently radiates (Bremstrallung). (This is the basis for the need for a QM conception of electrons.) ...
0
votes
1answer
576 views

Why magnetic field lines and force are not orthogonal with magnets?

The below explanation why magnetism exists is superb in this video. The explanation about magnets is also great in this video. A magnet has atoms with unpaired electrons forming mini magnets. The ...
-1
votes
2answers
334 views

Why moving charges causes Magnetic Field (module and direction)?

Why an constant electric current in a wire produces a magnetic field, that circles that wire? I know that this question was posted before. However, all answers talk about Maxwell equations, axioms, ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Finding the EOM for a charged relativistic particle

For an exercise sheet of a course in general relativity I'm asked to derive the equations of motion for a charged particle in an EM-field given by a potential $A^\mu$. I am give the action: $$S = ...