0
votes
0answers
26 views

My model of Conductors in “static” condition - Please analyze

My textbook presents an idealization of a conductor as made up of infinitesimal units of charge and derives results. I was not convinced, so I started thinking of how electric fields are in real ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

Electric Potential of Conductors

I understand that charges in a conductor reside on the surface of a conductor. So why is it that the neutral inside of a conductor and the charged surface are at the same potential?
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Why can we allow the speed of light being infinite in case of Surface Plasmons?

I have a problem with understanding of these sentences: We have indicated in the opening paragraph of the Introduction that surface plasmon polaritons are solutions of Maxwell’s equations in ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Physical, intuitive reason for divergence of dielectric constant at electronic percolation transition?

Several papers such as this (warning, PDF) and this (PDF again) talk about how, near the electronic percolation transition for a metallic 2D film, the real part of the dielectric constant diverges ...
2
votes
1answer
143 views

Does the Bohr van Leeuwen Theorem also apply to ferromagnetism?

I know that the Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem shows that there could be not consistent pure classical explanation of dia- and paramagnetism. Does the same theorem also rule out a consistent classical ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

How to isolate and verify the source of optical absorption/effects?

This is similar to my other question, but not the same -- that one was about the energy ranges of various absorption mechanisms, and this one is more about experimental techniques to find them. Let's ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

The speed of electrons moving in different medium

Can one have a simple (dimensional-analysis) model to evaluate the speed of electrons moving in: (1) a copper wire (2) a silver wire (3) a gold wire (4) a semiconductor wire let's use meter over ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Why are the bounds to the permittivity $\epsilon$ a circular arc in the complex plane?

I'm reading this paper which is essentially about connecting the complex permittivity $\epsilon$ with the microstructure of a thin film. They talk about how you can place limits on the possible values ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Relationship between Polarizability and Conductivity

I've seen in the literature the relation: $\sigma (q,\omega) = \frac{i e^2 \omega}{q^2}\chi(q,\omega)$ where $\sigma$ is the conductivity and $\chi$ the polarizability. However my attempt to derive ...
3
votes
1answer
102 views

What does “optical conductivity” mean?

Does it just mean "AC electric conductivity"? If so, why have a special name for it, and why mention optical specifically? The wikipedia page on it is very sparse. This (warning, PDF) document just ...
2
votes
0answers
49 views

What is $\epsilon_\infty$ in this equation and why can it be neglected in the IR?

I'm reading this paper (warning, PDF) and they mention that the complex permittivity $\epsilon$ and complex conductivity $\sigma$ are related through the equation $$\epsilon - \epsilon_\infty = (4\pi ...
4
votes
2answers
184 views

Why isn't there a potential difference across a disconnected diode?

I know this question sounds silly, as if there was a potential difference a current would be created when the terminals are connected together and this would mean energy has come from somewhere. The ...
0
votes
2answers
193 views

What are the 'oscillators' in the Drude Lorentz model?

Jackson's Electrodynamics defines the Drude-Lorentz model as a set of harmonic oscillators (running over indices $j$ below), which, if you write out the equations of motion and rearrange a little, ...
1
vote
3answers
167 views

Why are free electrons free?

This is what I understand so far: in a conductor, the ions have a weak pull on the valence electrons. So when an electric field is applied, the free electrons are able to easily move about. Makes ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

What is the significance of the difference in the eigenvalue equations of Bloch functions for electrons vs photons?

any text on photonic crystals will highlight the almost perfect analogy between electrons in a periodic potential and photons in a periodic dielectric. The analogies are: $$V(\vec r + \vec R) = ...
1
vote
2answers
522 views

Manganese has more unpaired electrons than Iron so why is Iron ferromagnetic Manganese paramagnetic?

Manganese has five unpaired electrons, but Iron has four, then why is Iron ferromagnetic and Manganese paramagnetic? What's that property I'm missing?
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Dielectric Constant or Permittivity of Metals

I'm wondering what the dielectric constant or permittivity of metals is --particularly copper. Do metals have an infinite permittivity?
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Why is an optical magnon with k=0 not an eigenenergy state?

I found in a paper the following explanation. Unfortunately, I can't understand it. Can anyone help me on this? In the limit of equal spins an optical magnon with k=0 gets an acoustical one at the ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

Which interaction is the responsible for long-range magnetism?

I'm taking solid state physics, subject mostly based on Ashcroft-Mermin's "solid state physics". Yesterday I sat for an exam and there was a question I couldn' t even answer: "Which interaction is ...
2
votes
0answers
147 views

Hall effect with similar positive and negative carriers?

The Hall effect includes the transverse (to the flow of current) electric field set up by the charges which accumulate on the edges, to counter the magnetic component of the Lorentz force acting on ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

Long range repulsion in anomalous solids

As far as I know things like rocks, walls, rubber balls, polished tables etc. exert a short range repulsive force on other everyday objects that is responsible for hardness, softness, collisions, ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Electric field and capacitance across a resistor

Using a simple lattice model of conduction, where electrons are accelerated by an electric field, and are slowed down by bumping into the lattice, you get the following equation for current density: ...
2
votes
2answers
185 views

A few questions about the Fermi Level/Energy

My first question is, how is the Fermi Energy for a material actually determined? I know this derivation, but it seems to say that the Fermi Energy is just based on the electron density (and maybe ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

books/topics to get started on physics of semiconductors [duplicate]

i would like to know enough about the physics of semiconductors to the point that i can extrapolate certain properties of custom semiconductor pieces. i'll mostly be using Technology CAD to simulate ...
3
votes
1answer
945 views

Fermi level alignment and electrochemical potential between two metals

I'm trying to get a more intuitive/physical grasp of the Fermi level, like I have of electric potential. I know that, for just a single piece of metal in equilibrium, you have to have the electric ...
1
vote
1answer
144 views

Accelerated charged particles produce electromagnetic radiation, but holes (the charge carriers) do not. Is this correct?

Holes are treated as particles in solid-state physics, so I've had some trouble with reasoning through this properly.
9
votes
2answers
237 views

Ferromagnetism with mobile spins

How can electron spins in Iron at room temperature have ferromagnetic order even though they are travelling at very high speeds? One could argue that spin and motion are completely uncorrelated and ...
-4
votes
3answers
977 views

There must be free positive charges, moving oppositely to electrons for the wire with current to stay neutral

All popular expositions (e.g. these ones) of relativistic electromagnetism claim univocally that electrons in motion become more dense due to the speed. They teach that Lorentz contraction of charges ...
1
vote
1answer
158 views

Understanding drift velocities in currents

I have a doubt about the understanding of drift velocities in a current. My problem is that the textbook speaks very loosely about this. It's like: "well, if we apply a field $E$ then the charges will ...
3
votes
1answer
252 views

Fermi level with Landau levels

So my question is regarding where the Fermi energy is when you have 2D electron gas in an applied magnetic field. My book explains that, using the Landau gauge, you find that the 2D density of states ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Why is copper diamagnetic?

Cu has an unpaired electron in 4s, but it is diamagnetic. I thought that it has to be paramagnetic. What am I missing?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between a photon and a phonon?

More specifically, how does a wave-particle duality differ from a quasiparticle/collective excitation? What makes a photon a gauge boson and a phonon a Nambu–Goldstone boson?
5
votes
1answer
133 views

Order of magnetic phase transitions

Is there any phase transition occur in paramagnetism to diamagnetism transitions state. What should be the order and how will I calculate the order?
7
votes
1answer
3k views

Why are some materials diamagnetic, others paramagnetic, and others ferromagnetic?

Why are some materials diamagnetic, others paramagnetic, and others ferromagnetic? Or, put another way, which of their atomic properties determines which of the three forms of magnetism (if at all) ...
0
votes
1answer
567 views

Pull up and Pull down register

Currently I am working with Pull up and pull down registers and trying to understand what does it mean? But could not able to understand. I searched in Wikipedia ...
3
votes
1answer
333 views

What is the time correlation function in the Green-Kubo formulation of ionic current?

I am reading a paper, and I came across the Green-Kubo formulation, where the conductivity $\sigma$ of charged particles is related to the time correlation function of the $z$-component of the ...
2
votes
2answers
165 views

What are the specific electronic properties that make an atom ferromagnetic versus simply paramagnetic?

As I understand it, paramagnetism is similar in its short-term effect to ferromagnetism (spins of the electrons line up with the magnetic field, etc.), though apparently the effect is weaker. What is ...
3
votes
1answer
296 views

Lorentz invariance of a frequency- and wavelength- dependent dielectric tensor

Suppose we have a material described by a dielectric tensor $\bar{\epsilon}$. In frequency domain, this tensor depends on the wave frequency $\omega$ and the wave vector $\vec{k}$. Clearly not all ...
12
votes
3answers
890 views

Shine a light into a superconductor

A type-I superconductor can expel almost all magnetic flux (below some critical value $H_c$) from its interior when superconducting. Light as we know is an electromagnetic wave. So what would happen ...