0
votes
1answer
52 views

Can we double the electric energy?

If I have $x$ amount of electrical energy and convert that into mechanical energy using an AC Motor, and then convert that energy back into electric using an AC generator, will the amount of energy ...
-1
votes
0answers
25 views

How does grounding work in details

How does grounding work exactly? Let's assume there is a wire with bad insulation and some conductor that is attached to this wire (from one end) and unattached on the other end. Current will not ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Isn't the inductor equation negative?

The inductor "resists" change in current. So say you measure the voltage across the inductor from point A to point B - the current is flowing in from A towards B. Now say the current is increasing. ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

What is the dormant common ground between harmonic mechanical oscilators and electromagnetical ones?

When I learnt electromagnetic oscillators I couldn't help but notice that it has many common stuff with mechanical ones. I know that it had to have sinusoidal equations. I (firstly, without ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Dependence of the Capacitance on the Material and Geometry of the Plates

I have two questions concerning capacitors: 1) We know that the capacitance of a capacitor also depend on the dielectric material inside as $C=$ $\dfrac{K \epsilon_0 A}{d}$ But what if the ...
2
votes
4answers
140 views

Application of Kirchhoff's laws in circuits with inductors

As we know,the Kirchhoff circuit laws are applicable for conservative electric fields. Now it is applicable for circuits where inductors are present but the field there is not conservative. So how ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Can someone please explain impedance matching and wave reflection?

I'm reading Wikipedia's article on impedance matching (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reflections_of_signals_on_conducting_lines) and this just seems so foreign to me. 1) What does it mean for a ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

How to calculate current flowing down a wire connecting charge to ground

If charge Q is connected to ground through a wire, how would you calculate the current that flows as a function of time? No other information is given. I have not seen this type of problem in the ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

How similar is comparison between the principle behind Newton's Cradle versus AC Current moving down a transmission line?

Anyone who has taken high school physics has seen the following assembly. You drop one ball from the left hand side and the ball from the farthest right hand side gets knocked away. This is to ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Current in an RC circuit inside in a magnetic field

Does my question make any sense? Context: The capacitor is charged with charge $Q_0$. There is a magnetic field $B=B_0 \hat{z}$ perpendicular to the monitor's screen. The length of the (AB) wire is ...
17
votes
4answers
2k views

Are voltages discrete when we zoom in enough?

Voltages are often thought of as continuous physical quantities. I was wondering whether by zooming in a lot, they are discrete. I feel like the answer to the above question is yes as voltages in the ...
0
votes
1answer
86 views

Circuit breaker Trips during thunderstorm

The circuit breaker at the electrical mains trips at home when there is a thunderstorm outside. Why does this occur?
3
votes
2answers
105 views

How are electromagnetic waves differentiated?

I would like to know how the signals for remote controlled cars, radios, etc.. That use radio waves are told apart from each other. I know that the radio waves are modulated to encode data and the ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

Is there inductance to a DC circuit?

When a DC circuit is carrying current, large amounts or small, is there induced-emf due to the inductance? Or is it only applied to AC circuits?
6
votes
1answer
192 views

Reluctance of torus shaped iron core with embedded wire loop

Imagine a circular wire loop (r = 50mm), the wire has an assumed diameter of zero, which is embedded in a torus shaped iron core with a circular cross-section of R = 10mm. A current in that loop ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

ODE envolving current [closed]

I have to do this exercise: 9. The current $I(t)$ at time $t$ flowing in an electric circuit obeys the differential equation $$I''(t) + RI'(t) + I(t) = \sin \omega t$$ where $R$ and ...
2
votes
2answers
166 views

How does AC current flow in an open circuit?

In common house hold wiring we have the hot lead, neutral and ground. If the hot lead in electrical wiring contacts earth ground (perhaps though a short circuit in the chassis of a device) then the ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Induction on a circuit with switch

I have the following circuit: It is subject to a steady, time-invariant magnetic field which points out of the paper. At $t = 0$, the switch closes. I thought that the magnetic flux would decrease ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Voltage across an inductor contradicts Lenz's law?

Imagine a simple circuit consisting of an alternating current source connected to an inductor. Assume they are connected in the following fashion: AC source - terminal A - Inductor - terminal B - AC ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Electricity voltage & current [closed]

Why does current return to its source?
2
votes
3answers
184 views

How do electrons actually move in a circuit?

Last year, we were taught about electricity, about how electrons in a closed circuit. But as our teacher had not taught us about electric fields yet, she gave us a simplified model of motion of ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

insufficient electrons in a conductor [duplicate]

We all know that if an electric field is applied across an isolated conductor, then charges are induced at either surface such that the net electric field inside becomes zero. Now if the applied ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Understanding frequency of a signal

I'm trying to understand how can one transmit different signals on a same copper wire using different frequencies. How does the electrons actually interact with the frequency? And how does the ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Why are diodes able to amplify signals in groups, but not alone?

Single diodes can determine whether a signal passes or not (depending on the biased)(plus they can even rectify a signal), yet why does it take a combination of diodes(like a transistor) to amplify a ...
0
votes
2answers
102 views

Why is emf equal to PD when circuit is “open”?

I understand that the set up of a battery consists of very good, but not ideal conductor, and therefore, some internal resistance exists. Also, I get that emf is the PD that would exist if the ...
4
votes
1answer
54 views

Why is Kirchoff's Current Rule valid?

The fact that Kirchoff's Current Rule is valid means that whatever current flows in flows out. But this will only be valid for a steady current circuit, that is, when there is no accumulation of ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

Voltage in a lossless transmission line

I have a question where I'm deriving expressions for different variables within a lossless transmission line. Here's the question as posed: Consider a lossless transmission line of characteristic ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

How to apply faraday's law to lc circiut

I am having problem on using Faraday's law correctly. When I try to apply Faraday's law to the LC circuit: Assume the top plate of capacitor is positively charged and bottom is negative. So no ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

How can current be a smooth curve?

The following is a graph of the current across some circuit element: Note how the current is treated like a smooth continuous function. Even in the analysis of things (i.e. analysis of the ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Sign convention for EMF

When we define the field generate by EMF, why there is not negative sign in $\mathcal{E} = \oint \vec{E} \cdot d\vec{l}$? Usually we talk about potential, there should be a negative sign, right?
1
vote
1answer
122 views

Batteries and fields?

Batteries generate fields in wires that essentially cause the movement of electrons. I think of batteries as two charged plates that essentially contain a mechanism between them to move electrons from ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Back EMF & Current, how can we make I stable?

Lets assume we have a wire that has $10V$ across and $1$ $Amp$ flowing, now if this conductor is introduced to a changing magnetic field, $-EMF$ is induced, can we control our voltage to increase it ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Does back emf occur in transformers?

Does back emf occur in transformers and if so does it reduce the efficiency of the transformer and can it be reduced?
1
vote
3answers
98 views

Current through two inductors after a long time

I'm having trouble with visualizing the following problem, which is asking me for the final, steady current in both inductors $L_{1}$ and $L_{2}$. I was thinking that after a long time, essentially ...
1
vote
1answer
233 views

How is the current flow perpendicular to the wire?

This answer gives a great explanation of how surface charge builds up to force the current to move perpendicular to the wire: http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/102936/41086 However, it fails to ...
1
vote
3answers
356 views

Why do both plates of a capacitor have the same charge?

How do we know that both plates of a capacitor have the same charge? You could argue conservation of charge, but I don't see how conservation of charge implies the charge on both plates is the same. ...
5
votes
1answer
411 views

Why doesn't the electric field inside a wire in a circuit fall off with distance from the battery?

We studied electric fields due to point charges. The magnitude of these fields decreases with the square of the distance from the point charge. It seems to me that we could treat the positive ...
6
votes
4answers
828 views

What is the current of a capacitor when the derivative of voltage is undefined?

This is from the textbook I am reading: I know this equation for capacitors: $$i=C\cdot \frac { dv }{ dt }$$ Here is my question: how can diagram (a) be allowed if the derivative of the voltage ...
1
vote
1answer
174 views

How can electrons move along the conductive wire? ( seems to be a paradox )

Tangential components of the electric field across an interface between two media, with no impressed magnetic current densities along the boundary of the interface, are continuous. So: $ n \times (E_2 ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?

How can KVL (Kirchhoff's Voltage Law) & KCL (Kirchhoff's Current law) be derived from Maxwell equations in lumped circuits?(Lumped network : if $d$is the largest dimension of the network and ...
6
votes
5answers
541 views

What is Electromotive force (EMF)? How is it related to potential difference?

What is Electromotive force (EMF)? How is it related to potential difference? Is it the creation of potential difference in any conductor??Is it a process?Why is it called force? Does writing emf ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Energy in a Solenoid?

Consider a circuit consisting of a battery, a resistor and a solenoid inductor. Then, the emf $\mathcal{E}$, is defined as: $$\mathcal{E} = L\frac{di}{dt} + iR$$ Multiplying both sides by ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Kirchoff Loop and current

The pic of the circuit/problem: I got the problem right, but i want to make sure my reasoning is correct for the current left of the 2.1 V battery. Its the same current as $I_1$ because the ...
1
vote
0answers
73 views

Different phase in capacitively coupled RLC circuits

I was trying to work with some data for a lab report I'm writing about capacitively coupled RLC circuits. The setup is pretty simple and looks like that: Where $C^{'}$ is the coupling capacitance. ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Understanding Counter - EMF?

When an coil rotor is moving around a magnetic field there is -V induced to resist the input V. Let's take an example, a 12 V DC motor induces -10V, and the actual running voltage is 2V. If there ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Conversion of Moving coil galvanometer to ammeter

A galvanometer can be converted into an ammeter by connecting a low resistance (called shunt resistance) in parallel to the galvanometer. Firstly, why do we need to connect the resistance? If a ...
3
votes
2answers
680 views

Capacitors: why is the energy not stored in a magnetic field?

When a capacitor is charging, the rate of change $dE/dt$ of the electric field between the plates is non-zero, and from the Maxwell-Ampère equation this causes a circulating magnetic field. Now, ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Are magnetic hysteresis losses relevant to alternating currents flowing in a wire?

Say we have an AC in a magnetically lossy material, like iron. Because of iron's relatively high permeability, skin effect will be more pronounced than it is in say, copper, so this iron wire isn't so ...
1
vote
2answers
289 views

Surface charge in a wire?

The image above shows the distribution of the surface charge in a current carrying wire. The surface charges distributes themselves to make sure the field inside the wire is always perpendicular to ...
3
votes
1answer
572 views

Electric field in a wire?

The electric field in a wire is parallel to the wire's surface (it is always pointing "to the front"). If the electric field did not point in this direction, surface charges would build up and ...