1
vote
0answers
22 views

ODE envolving current [on hold]

I have to do this exercise: 9. The current $I(t)$ at time $t$ flowing in an electric circuit obeys the differential equation $$I''(t) + RI'(t) + I(t) = \sin \omega t$$ where $R$ and ...
2
votes
2answers
62 views

How does AC current flow in an open circuit?

In common house hold wiring we have the hot lead, neutral and ground. If the hot lead in electrical wiring contacts earth ground (perhaps though a short circuit in the chassis of a device) then the ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Voltage across an inductor contradicts Lenz's law?

Imagine a simple circuit consisting of an alternating current source connected to an inductor. Assume they are connected in the following fashion: AC source - terminal A - Inductor - terminal B - AC ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Electricity voltage & current [closed]

Why does current return to its source?
2
votes
3answers
102 views

How do electrons actually move in a circuit?

Last year, we were taught about electricity, about how electrons in a closed circuit. But as our teacher had not taught us about electric fields yet, she gave us a simplified model of motion of ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

insufficient electrons in a conductor [duplicate]

We all know that if an electric field is applied across an isolated conductor, then charges are induced at either surface such that the net electric field inside becomes zero. Now if the applied ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Understanding frequency of a signal

I'm trying to understand how can one transmit different signals on a same copper wire using different frequencies. How does the electrons actually interact with the frequency? And how does the ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Why are diodes able to amplify signals in groups, but not alone?

Single diodes can determine whether a signal passes or not (depending on the biased)(plus they can even rectify a signal), yet why does it take a combination of diodes(like a transistor) to amplify a ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Why is emf equal to PD when circuit is “open”?

I understand that the set up of a battery consists of very good, but not ideal conductor, and therefore, some internal resistance exists. Also, I get that emf is the PD that would exist if the ...
4
votes
1answer
48 views

Why is Kirchoff's Current Rule valid?

The fact that Kirchoff's Current Rule is valid means that whatever current flows in flows out. But this will only be valid for a steady current circuit, that is, when there is no accumulation of ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Voltage in a lossless transmission line

I have a question where I'm deriving expressions for different variables within a lossless transmission line. Here's the question as posed: Consider a lossless transmission line of characteristic ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

How to apply faraday's law to lc circiut

I am having problem on using Faraday's law correctly. When I try to apply Faraday's law to the LC circuit: Assume the top plate of capacitor is positively charged and bottom is negative. So no ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

How can current be a smooth curve?

The following is a graph of the current across some circuit element: Note how the current is treated like a smooth continuous function. Even in the analysis of things (i.e. analysis of the ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Sign convention for EMF

When we define the field generate by EMF, why there is not negative sign in $\mathcal{E} = \oint \vec{E} \cdot d\vec{l}$? Usually we talk about potential, there should be a negative sign, right?
1
vote
1answer
103 views

Batteries and fields?

Batteries generate fields in wires that essentially cause the movement of electrons. I think of batteries as two charged plates that essentially contain a mechanism between them to move electrons from ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Back EMF & Current, how can we make I stable?

Lets assume we have a wire that has $10V$ across and $1$ $Amp$ flowing, now if this conductor is introduced to a changing magnetic field, $-EMF$ is induced, can we control our voltage to increase it ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Does back emf occur in transformers?

Does back emf occur in transformers and if so does it reduce the efficiency of the transformer and can it be reduced?
1
vote
3answers
86 views

Current through two inductors after a long time

I'm having trouble with visualizing the following problem, which is asking me for the final, steady current in both inductors $L_{1}$ and $L_{2}$. I was thinking that after a long time, essentially ...
1
vote
1answer
184 views

How does current flow perpendicular to the wire?

This answer gives a great explanation of how surface charge builds up to force the current to move perpendicular to the wire: http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/102936/41086 However, it fails to ...
1
vote
3answers
221 views

Why do both plates of a capacitor have the same charge?

How do we know that both plates of a capacitor have the same charge? You could argue conservation of charge, but I don't see how conservation of charge implies the charge on both plates is the same. ...
4
votes
1answer
307 views

Why doesn't the electric field inside a wire in a circuit fall off with distance from the battery?

We studied electric fields due to point charges. The magnitude of these fields decreases with the square of the distance from the point charge. It seems to me that we could treat the positive ...
6
votes
4answers
589 views

What is the current of a capacitor when the derivative of voltage is undefined?

This is from the textbook I am reading: I know this equation for capacitors: $$i=C\cdot \frac { dv }{ dt }$$ Here is my question: how can diagram (a) be allowed if the derivative of the voltage ...
1
vote
1answer
160 views

How can electrons move along the conductive wire? ( seems to be a paradox )

Tangential components of the electric field across an interface between two media, with no impressed magnetic current densities along the boundary of the interface, are continuous. So: $ n \times (E_2 ...
4
votes
1answer
721 views

How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?

How can KVL (Kirchhoff's Voltage Law) & KCL (Kirchhoff's Current law) be derived from Maxwell equations in lumped circuits?(Lumped network : if $d$is the largest dimension of the network and ...
6
votes
5answers
302 views

What is Electromotive force (EMF)? How is it related to potential difference?

What is Electromotive force (EMF)? How is it related to potential difference? Is it the creation of potential difference in any conductor??Is it a process?Why is it called force? Does writing emf ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Energy in a Solenoid?

Consider a circuit consisting of a battery, a resistor and a solenoid inductor. Then, the emf $\mathcal{E}$, is defined as: $$\mathcal{E} = L\frac{di}{dt} + iR$$ Multiplying both sides by ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Kirchoff Loop and current

The pic of the circuit/problem: I got the problem right, but i want to make sure my reasoning is correct for the current left of the 2.1 V battery. Its the same current as $I_1$ because the ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

Different phase in capacitively coupled RLC circuits

I was trying to work with some data for a lab report I'm writing about capacitively coupled RLC circuits. The setup is pretty simple and looks like that: Where $C^{'}$ is the coupling capacitance. ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Understanding Counter - EMF?

When an coil rotor is moving around a magnetic field there is -V induced to resist the input V. Let's take an example, a 12 V DC motor induces -10V, and the actual running voltage is 2V. If there ...
0
votes
2answers
542 views

Conversion of Moving coil galvanometer to ammeter

A galvanometer can be converted into an ammeter by connecting a low resistance (called shunt resistance) in parallel to the galvanometer. Firstly, why do we need to connect the resistance? If a ...
3
votes
2answers
480 views

Capacitors: why is the energy not stored in a magnetic field?

When a capacitor is charging, the rate of change $dE/dt$ of the electric field between the plates is non-zero, and from the Maxwell-Ampère equation this causes a circulating magnetic field. Now, ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Are magnetic hysteresis losses relevant to alternating currents flowing in a wire?

Say we have an AC in a magnetically lossy material, like iron. Because of iron's relatively high permeability, skin effect will be more pronounced than it is in say, copper, so this iron wire isn't so ...
1
vote
2answers
230 views

Surface charge in a wire?

The image above shows the distribution of the surface charge in a current carrying wire. The surface charges distributes themselves to make sure the field inside the wire is always perpendicular to ...
3
votes
1answer
408 views

Electric field in a wire?

The electric field in a wire is parallel to the wire's surface (it is always pointing "to the front"). If the electric field did not point in this direction, surface charges would build up and ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Voltage in a circuit?

The voltage of the battery signifies the difference in voltage between the positive and negative terminal What does this mean? The definition of voltage difference I'm familiar with is the ...
4
votes
3answers
828 views

Reducing Eddy current losses

Eddy currents are setup in any metallic block which is in the vicinity of changing magnetic fluxes. These primarily cause heat losses, and in certain cases causes damping of the relative motion ...
2
votes
2answers
243 views

Does AC current produce EM waves?

Does AC current in simple wires produce electromagnetic waves? AC current entails very rapid changes in polarity and therefore the electrons in the metal will feel rapidly changing forces which should ...
1
vote
0answers
112 views

How does the tester screwdriver work? [closed]

How does the tester screwdriver work? If I put the tester screwdriver inside a "phase" hole of an electric socket, it lits up. If I press my finger against the metal cap on top of the screwdriver. ...
0
votes
0answers
124 views

Microscopic model of RLC circuit equation by analogy to continuous medium mechanics

According to the analogy of mechanics and electricity, the 1-D system of damped oscillation is similar to the RLC circuit. The equation of damped oscillation is $$ f=m\frac{dv}{dt}+\gamma v+kx$$ ...
1
vote
1answer
134 views

Traditional Kirchoff voltage law in AC circuit?

The traditional (not taking into account phasor addition or complex addition) application of Kirchoff Voltage law, i.e. $\Sigma\Delta V=0$ along a loop, does not work for AC circuits. We can sum the ...
1
vote
4answers
192 views

Is voltage important when creating a magnetic field?

Would a DC circuit that has a high current and low voltage have a powerful magnetic field? I'm trying to create a powerful solenoid. In order to create a powerful magnetic field, I'm focusing more on ...
2
votes
2answers
98 views

What is the area in Faraday's law if we have only a piece of metal moving in a magnetic field?

If a piece of metal of length $l$ is moving with a speed $v$ in a region where there is a uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it, there will be a potential difference across its terminals ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

Magnetic core, and a DC solenoid

A DC solenoid creates a magnetic field B. A highly permeability magnetic core is added to solenoid to increase B. Now, there is change in flux, due to the increase in magnetic field. What would be ...
3
votes
2answers
121 views

Is there a differential equation that can represent a circuit with an arbitrary voltage source connected acrorss an antenna?

An RLC circuit with a voltage source can be characterized by the differential equation: $$ LC\;\ddot{I}\left(t\right) + RC\; \dot{I}\left(t\right) + I\left(t\right)-C \;\dot{V}\left(t\right) = 0 $$ ...
0
votes
1answer
132 views

Voltmeter Question [closed]

I understand that a voltmeter is used for measuring potential electrical difference, but how exactly should said voltmeter be connected with the resistor in circuit?
-1
votes
2answers
86 views

Time difference in transmission of AC and DC

Is there any time difference while considering the transmission of AC and DC ? Is either one of them faster than the other one in terms of transmission of energy/power from one point to another? I ...
1
vote
1answer
195 views

How to imagine the first few moments of an LR circuit?

For example, there's a very simple circuit which only contains on resistor. So according to Ohm's law, we have: $\mathrm{emf} = IR$ As we know when time $t = 0$, the current must be $I = 0$. However, ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

how does an electric field comes inside a conducting wire inside the circuit? [duplicate]

This has been a really great confusion for me now .... Many places i have read in books that when a potential difference is applied across the ends of a wire a constant electric field is generated ...
1
vote
1answer
380 views

Why the electric bulb turns on almost instantly when the switch is closed? [duplicate]

The electron drift speed is estimated to be very low.How could there is current almost the instant a circuit is closed?? By the discussions it is known that The information about beginning of the ...
4
votes
2answers
619 views

Why is the voltage drop across an ideal wire zero?

I'm having trouble conceptualizing why the voltage drop between two points of an ideal wire (i.e. no resistance) is $0~V$. Using Ohm's Law, the equation is such: $$ V = IR \\ V = I(0~\Omega) \\ V = ...