Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

5
votes
2answers
216 views

Impossible microwave interference?

I was doing a microwave experiment with the following set up: there is a Gunn diode which emmits microwave radiation and a receiver (both work with polarised light). The strange thing is that when ...
3
votes
3answers
75 views

In scattering, how does a particle 'know' which direction it is being illuminated from?

In scattering experiments, for example light scattering, the scattering strength from different sized particles is depicted as below. What I can't understand is: how does a particle know which ...
3
votes
2answers
55 views

Why is radiation for an ultrarelativistic charge zero on axis?

I attribute it to the fact that for an ultrarelativistic charge the field is contracted and essentially there are only fields in the transverse direction and nothing longitudinally (wrt the charges ...
1
vote
2answers
110 views

Can electromagnetic fields be used to shield electromagnetic radiation?

Can electromagnetic fields be used as shielding for electromagnetic radiation?
3
votes
0answers
44 views

Free charge movement in an electric field - including bremsstrahlung

Let us imagine a free, negatively charged object that is in rest and placed in an elecric field of a point positive charge. The positive charge has a huge mass and cannot move, so we consider only the ...
14
votes
3answers
1k views

Is the frequency of light restricted?

What are the factors that limit the frequency of light? Can it have wavelengths ranging between zero and infinity?
3
votes
2answers
81 views

Physical reason why (hot) objects glow? [duplicate]

Every object at a non-zero temperature radiates light, i.e. it glows. (Is that called blackbody radiation?) What is the physical reason to this? Is it because more heat implies that the atoms ...
4
votes
10answers
2k views

Why do we think of light as a wave?

I've read that light travels in a straight line and has a wavelength of 400nm to 700nm. But I don't understand why does it have a wavelength and what creates its wavelength? I agree with the concept ...
17
votes
3answers
4k views

How would an X-ray scanner identify a mirror?

A mirror is under normal circumstance used to reflect Electromagnetic radiation also known as photons (light) and in airport security or medical facilities, they use X-rays to detect anomalies inside ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Where does $R/\gamma^3$ come from in relativistic E&M?

I am starting to read many papers on electron beam physics; more specifically its motion in a magnet i.e. curved motion. The term $R/\gamma^3$ comes up a lot, but I don't know where they are coming ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Electromagnetic waves in an antenna

There is a few questions that need to be answered in detail but in an easy way... What does it mean to describe the 'plane of polarisation' of electromagnetic waves? Why will some antenna have rods ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Radiation emission and absorption

Any object can emit and absorb radiation and the power of emission can be represented by the Stefan-Boltzmann law: $$P=A\epsilon\sigma T^4$$ In many texts the net power radiated is the difference ...
-4
votes
1answer
77 views

Massless particles and the speed of light - New? Theories of existence [closed]

"The best understanding we have is that it [light] is a disturbance in the electromagnetic fields of charged bodies." http://einstein.stanford.edu/content/relativity/q212.html This is a link to the ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

If light was able to pass through a wall, would the wall be invisible to the human eye? [closed]

In addition, to get light to other side of the wall, could it be converted to radio waves and then back to light waves? Edit: My idea was if there was a special material that was painted on both ...
4
votes
1answer
539 views

Two photons transition

if an atom in its ground state is coupled to an electromagnetic field it can absorb a photon if the EM field contains one with the right frequency. These transitions depends on $⟨f|H_i|i⟩$ (from ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

How does the grid on the microwave oven window prevent microwave radiation from coming out?

If I look through the microwave window I can see through, which means visible radiation can get out. We know also that there is a mesh on the microwave window which prevents microwave from coming out. ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

How can we detect X-rays?

I know that X-rays can be detected by various ways, like ionizing of air particles. Is there a way to detect X-rays,which are photons, by detecting? Can something absorb the energy of the X-rays and ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Could airport security devices detect differences between printed and written documents?

If airport security scanners of any kind (xray, thermal, whatever else they use) looked at two items: A printed paper textbook The same printed paper textbook into which we have inserted a regular ...
4
votes
1answer
133 views

Does any lower frequency electromagnetic radiation naturally reach us from the Sun?

I am not sure whether the sun originally emits everything in the electromagnetic spectrum, (whatever the relative strengths of each portion might be), but I do read that many waves, including gamma / ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Mathematical formalism to include wave and particle perspectives of light

Does the exist any mathematical formalism (model) describing the behavior of light and incorporating its particle character (divisibility, quantization) and wave character? (i.e. quantized wave model) ...
1
vote
3answers
317 views

Does the intensity of dipole radiation fall as $1/r^2$ or $1/r^3$?

I have seen this derivation: I want to estimate what is the intensity of the electrical field as function of $r$ the distance from the radiated source ? I think it is can modled as pointed source ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

phase difference between incident plane wave incident on a dipole and radiation fields from dipole

i have an incident plane wave and a dipole, consider that plane wave incident on dipole. at this moment what happen for dipole ? we know that after incident of plane wave on dipole, the radiation have ...
3
votes
3answers
58 views

Unpolarized Light

Suppose I had a ray of unpolarized light, and I was sitting inside the beam and looking at the electric fields oscillating, then , if I am looking at a point how would the oscillations look like? I ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Blackbody and standing waves

I'm reading articles about black body radiation and why classical mechanics fails to explain it. My question is: Why do EM waves have to be standing wave in a cavity?
3
votes
4answers
564 views

Do Electromagnetic Waves really propagate through continuous Induction?

I've often seen it said that in an Electromagnetic Wave the changing Electric Field component creates the Magnetic Field Component and the changing Magnetic Field Component in turn creates an Electric ...
5
votes
2answers
379 views

Does light really “travel”?

From what I've so far understood about light, a photon is emitted somewhere and after some time it's absorbed somewhere else. Have we had experiments that confirm the path taken or something akin to ...
1
vote
3answers
91 views

Do photons interact only with single particles or can a single photon be absorbed by 2 or more particles simultaneously?

Say I have 100 particles in a vacuum that are spread out such that their movement caused by a time variant electromagnetic field does not have an effect on each other. That is the particles can not ...
2
votes
3answers
188 views

How to understand “accelerating charge radiate” using intuition? [duplicate]

While I know that accelerating charges produces EM radiations (at least in lots of cases), most discussion about this matter only focuses on which kind of situation will emit EM radiations and which ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Microwaves vs Gas or Electric Coil heating of a water boiler in a typical household

Wouldn't it be more energy efficient and or safe to use microwaves to heat our home's water boiler instead of using dangerous gas or hot electric coils that could catch other things on fire? I'm kinda ...
6
votes
3answers
553 views

How is temperature related to color?

I spent some time studying about temperatures and color of objects. It turns out that as we heat something it turns to red, then yellowish white and if we heat it more it turns to bluish-white. Like ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant vs refractive index?

So for a complex dielectric constant $\epsilon = \epsilon_a + i\epsilon_b$, the wave vector and index of refraction are related to it through $k = \frac{\omega}{c}n$ and $n = \sqrt{\frac{\mu ...
1
vote
3answers
108 views

Is the Speed of Light an universal spacetime constant, the velocity of electromagnetic waves, or of photons?

This question has been touched tangentially by What's a better phrase than "speed of light" for the universal spacetime speed constant? and Could light travel more slowly than the ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

What is absorption of an electromagnetic wave?

Can any one explain the absorption/transmission/reflection of electromagnetic waves in the wave form? It is generally said that the atom absorbs/reflects/transmits photon. But can this phenomena be ...
2
votes
1answer
569 views

Physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and origin of EM waves

Is it possible to describe the physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and show how they lead to electromagnetic wave, with little involvement of mathematics ?
0
votes
2answers
101 views

What is the difference between light and visible light? [duplicate]

After watching a few videos on light and electromagnetic radiation, I am a little confused. The way things are explained, is that light is just the same as electromagnetic radiation I thought this ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Probability density of detection of collinearly emitted photons in two detectors

Update: As proposed by @dmckee, I added equation numbers and improved the display of some equations. The answer by @Trimok inspired me to look at coordinate systems which are not specific to the ...
4
votes
2answers
455 views

Do x-rays and gamma rays also contain photons like visible light does?

Do x-rays and gamma rays also contain photons like visible light does? If so, then what makes photons of visible light and other waves different? The rest mass of a photon is zero, but as it moves at ...
3
votes
3answers
651 views

Temperature behavior over time of black or white cars in hot, sunny regions

How does the color of a car influence its inner temperature change over time when parked outside in windless, hot and sunny regions? I know what's the common idea about that: black cars are supposed ...
0
votes
1answer
114 views

Can we draw analogy between em power flow through free space and ac power flow through a transmission line?

Knowing that the free space has a characteristic impedance (which is purely resistive, measured in ohms) I was wondering if I can model the free space as an infinitely long transmission line- ...
3
votes
2answers
174 views

Why doesn't the magnetic field polarize when polarizing light?

If the magnetic field doesn't polarize does it follow the electric field path of propagation? or does it vanish?
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Admixtures of longitudinal and timelike photons!

In the quantization of electromagnetic field the physical states $|\psi\rangle$ are found to obey the following relation: $[a^{(0)}(k)-a^{(3)}(k)]|\psi\rangle=0$ It is explained as the physical ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Why is it necessary for an object to have a bigger size than the wavelength of light in order for us to see it?

I keep hearing this rule that an object must have a bigger size than the wavelength of light in order for us to see it, and though I don't have any professional relationship with physics, I want to ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Far Field Diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
1
vote
2answers
43 views

On the shape of magnetic and electric fields in an electromagnetic wave

Electromagnetic waves are generally depicted like this: Where the electric fields and magnetic fields exist in the planes perpendicular to the direction of propagation. I also realize that as the ...
3
votes
5answers
242 views

How is a vacuum able to propagate light?

We say that sound waves need a medium to propagate and we know that light doesn't need such a thing. But is that really how that works? There's no such thing as "nothing" according to Quantum ...
2
votes
2answers
248 views

Which cyan colored line is produced in the Thomson e/m apparatus?

Related: Which green spectral line(s) are emitted in a Thomson tube? After reading Lisa Lee’s OP on an electron deflection tube, although she had some misunderstandings on its operation, I still ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Earnshaw Theorem for ionic solids

Is a single molecule of sodium chloride (say) or a cluster of molecules of NaCl unstable, although macroscopically NaCl is in fact, stable? How can I reason this based on Earnshaw's theorem?
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Would white light waves act as same as monochromatic waves in double slit experiment?

Would white light waves act as same as monochromatic waves in double slit experiment? If not, what pattern would be seen on the screen?
1
vote
1answer
42 views

AM vs FM radio under bridges

I know what the difference between AM (Amplitude Modulation) and FM (Frequency Modulation) radios is. However, I noticed that when I drive under a bridge while listening to a station on AM, it just ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

transfer of electricity through electromagnetic waves

Is it possible to transfer electricity from one place to another without the help of physical wires.