Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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How to think about Ripple and Noise in circuits

Say you have a AC to DC power supply. If you were to hook an oscilloscope up you would see noise occurring. Some of it would appear to have a regular frequency in Khz or Mhz. Would this put off EM ...
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What does electric field of unpolarized light look like when measured?

When we talk about fermions in mixed state, we say that their state can't be described by a wavefunction and just compute all the probabilities using density matrix. That's OK because the ...
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How is a vacuum able to propagate light?

We say that sound waves need a medium to propagate and we know that light doesn't need such a thing. But is that really how that works? There's no such thing as "nothing" according to Quantum ...
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To which extent is the treatment of nuclear multipole radiation by the means of a classical electromagnetic field valid?

In the treatment of nuclear multipole radiation, for example in the context of nuclear gamma decay, it is standard, at least at the elementary level, to formalize the electromagnetic radiation as a ...
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2answers
34 views

Magnetic induction to generate EM waves

Let's say that I create a time varying magnetic field. This field then cuts a conducting circular loop normally. The loop has two protruding wires. Will the protruding wires emit EM waves? I ...
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104 views

How to represent a laser pulse in quantum optics

Every quantum optics textbook that I've found says something like "a coherent state represents the output of a laser", but a coherent state is a static thing (aside from the oscillating phase of the ...
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48 views

How many photons are there in free space on average

Estimates of the amount of for example "dark matter" are of interest to the cosmologists. However, I have never seen an estimate of how many "free" photons could be speeding about in the known ...
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Do the electric and magnetic components of an electromagnetic wave really generate each other?

Frequently when EM waves are taught, it is said that the change in electric field causes a change in the magnetic field, which then causes a change in the electric field, and so on and so forth. But ...
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1answer
133 views

polarization of a transverse wave travelling in ionosphere with polarization direction perpendicular to earths magnetic field

Assume a transverse electromagnetic wave entering ionosphere such that its Electric field of wave is perpendicular to earths magnetic field. Now, i read that as it will enter plasma, the wave will ...
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optoelectronics-smallest wavelength of light

Sorry this maybe a stupid question , but i need to know: A few minutes ago i have read an article about optoelectronics: worlds first optical single atom switch The writer of the article ...
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What does this coordinate transformation in the Wave equation mean?

My tutor derived the following of which I do not understand the transformations (2.1) and (2.2): $$\Delta\vec{E} - \frac{1}{c^{2}} \frac{\partial^{2}\vec{E}}{\partial t^{2}} = \frac{4\pi}{c^{2}} ...
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32 views

What do we mean by wavelength of any electromagnetic wave?

What do we mean by wavelength of EMW? Wavelength of oscillating electric field or the oscillating magnetic field? Or is it that both the electric and magnetic field waves have same wavelength? If ...
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Far field diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the Fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
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130 views

Why does a laser beam stay collimated?

I am looking for a simple way of explaining the collimation of a laser beam. The typical discussion of the two slit experiment of quantum theory relies heavily on the Huygens principle. Its ...
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Implications for measurement of an initially localized free particle's wavefunction spreading out to infinity?

So, I have been attempting to wrap my head around what happens to a free particle that is initially localized to one spot. It seems that due to their different frequencies, the particle's wavefunction ...
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1answer
123 views

Is there any observational test that could be done to approve\ disapprove the Tired Light theory? [closed]

Tired light is alternative explanation for the redshift-distance relationship and for the metric expansion of space. The suggestion is if photons lost energy over time through collisions with other ...
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132 views

How can one meaningfully say that one field generates the other in an EM-wave?

This is a follow up question to: Do the electric and magnetic components of an electromagnetic wave really generate each other? Clearly there are nuances of how one states the "mutual induction" ...
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28 views

Doppler and Special Relativity [closed]

I am on the tip of a spaceship going close to the speed of light. According to doppler, when I look forward, light will be shifted blue. According to Einstein, my time has slowed so the frequency of ...
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2answers
196 views

What electromagnetic wave produces the strongest electrical current when making contact with an element?

More specifically, what electromagnetic waves can we utilize to generate electrical power and out of those waves, which one would produce the most power? Additionally, which one would be the most ...
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Can light exist in $2+1$ or $1+1$ spacetime dimensions?

Spacetime of special relativity is frequently illustrated with its spatial part reduced to one or two spatial dimension (with light sector or cone, respectively). Taken literally, is it possible for ...
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Why must this boundary condition be met? (Electromagnetic wave at interface between two mediums)

My textbook says that The laws of Electromagnetic Theory (Section 3.1) lead to certain requirements that must be met by the fields, and they are referred to as the boundary conditions. ...
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Estimating temperature with Boltzmann relation with split emission lines

I'm trying to estimate the temperature of a plasma through the use of hydrogen lines, $H_{\alpha}$ and $H_{\beta}$ using the Boltzmann relation: $$ \frac{ n_{2} }{ n_{1} } = \frac{ g_{2} }{ g_{1} ...
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58 views

The many faces of electromagnetic waves

In my waves and optics class, we have learned several ways to treat electromagnetic waves: light rays (geometric optics), electromagnetic plane waves, spherical waves, cylindrical waves (2D). One ...
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105 views

A plane electromagnetic wave - phase change - amplitude

A plane electromagnetic wave has the shape: $\vec{E}(\vec{r},t)=E_0\cdot cos(\vec{k}\vec{r}-\omega t)\cdot \vec{e}_y$ $\vec{B}(\vec{r},t)=(B_1\cdot cos(\vec{k}\vec{r}-\omega t)+B_2\cdot ...
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1answer
23 views

Vanishing dipole radiation of equidistant point charges on a ring

I learned that if I distribute point charges uniformly on a circle and let them run along the circle with the same constant speed, the dipole radiation of that configuration vanishes. However, moving ...
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2answers
60 views

When sunlight bounces off the Earth, why isn't the entire spectrum reflected rather than just the infrared portion?

I've read that greenhouse gases absorb and reemit sunlight, and that the infrared portion is what bounces off Earth back to space. When sunlight bounces off the Earth, why isn't the entire spectrum ...
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42 views

Experimental evidence for nonlinear electrodynamics

Has any experiment been conducted which shows that, above a certain threshold of field strength, electromagnetic interactions become nonlinear? If not, which field strength threshold is the one under ...
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47 views

Will radio waves bend to reach receiver?

I was wondering if receivers just catch the radio waves that pass through, or if they actually attract the waves like a magnet. In other words, will a radio wave moving in a straight line bend in ...
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2answers
95 views

Does light interact with electric fields?

We know that light is an electromagnetic wave and it does interact with charges. It contains magnetic field and electric field oscillating perpendicularly but when we apply an electric or magnetic ...
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1answer
58 views

Will throwing oil on snow help it melt faster (significantly)? [closed]

The main thing that melts snow is the sun. Indeed, without the sun, the air itself would eventually turn to snow. The problem is, the sun melts snow inefficiently. The sun emits radiation (a lot of ...
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1answer
38 views

Electromagnetic plane waves [closed]

I have a question, a planewave impedance E/H =377 ohm, and it is said that for plane waves none of the components electric and magnetic dominates they are indistinguishable or same. But what about ...
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1answer
49 views

Counting modes Rayleigh-Jeans

In the derivation of the Rayleigh-Jeans Law, we count the number of EM modes in a square cavity. After calculating the number of allowed modes due to boundary conditions, we multiply it by a factor of ...
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0answers
39 views

How can we detect particles?

A constant velocity particle (charged or uncharged) can only be detected if its velocity is made to change, e.g. by scattering another particle or radiation off it. If it's velocity remains constant, ...
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43 views

WHY do waves diffract - what is the mechanism behind the diffraction?

Having recently studied wave diffraction at an introductory level, I don't feel that I understand why waves diffract like they do. What is it about the obstacle or the waves interaction with it which ...
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1answer
22 views

Quantim efficiency of a radio receiver

In optical communication we often know quantum efficiency of the receiver (probability of single photon detection and bitrate per photon). Are there any estimations on typical achievable quantum ...
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4answers
460 views

What is the experimental evidence that light is an electromagnetic wave?

Do we have any experimental evidence to confirm that light is an electromagnetic wave? Or is it confirmed simply by Maxwell's equations showing a similarity in speed?
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2answers
41 views

How can the position of charge be determined without EM waves?

 The EM waves produced by accelerating charges can perhaps be used to locate the position of the charge, as usually done with the de Broglie waves. The stronger the oscillations of the electric and ...
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1answer
71 views

How do we know that light is made up of electric and magnetic fields? [duplicate]

What are the experiments that prove that light consists of electric and magnetic field oscillating perpendicular to each other. What are the experimental evidence we have for this theory of light ?
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6answers
154 views

Light in mass moving at high velocity

Imagine if you will, a strand of fiber optic cable 186,000 miles long. A pulse of light is sent through the stationary cable: it takes 1 second for light to travel the entire length of the cable. Now ...
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1answer
35 views

Difference between reflection mechanisms in dielectric, metals and plasma

How the reflection and transmissions mechanism are different in metals, dielectric and plasma? I know that the density of free electrons is playing the role. Can anyone give an insight what is ...
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2answers
65 views

Would a Faraday Cage protect something from an EMP?

Assume that terrorists manage to detonate an EMP in the middle of the United States. Its range is long enough for the pulse to hit and effectively render useless all unprotected hardware. Let's ...
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1answer
590 views

How is a CCD able to collect images in drastically different lighting conditions?

I have read the basics of how a digital camera works. As much as I have understood, the digital cameras have a device called a CCD on which photons coming from the lens are incident. The CCD then ...
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2answers
40 views

Can radio waves be stored in a device for future use? [closed]

Is it possible to store electromagnetic waves consisting of radio waves only without any other intermittent signals??
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0answers
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Why is the susceptibility $\chi(t)$ real?

So my question is quite simple I suppose, and perhaps trivial. It is known that the frequency domain susceptbility $\chi(\omega)$ is complex, and that the two parts can be related with the ...
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1answer
31 views

Effectiveness of Layered EM wave shields [closed]

Which is best at shielding EM waves; a Faraday cage with sides made of blocks of metal, or layers of metal (with insulation ie plastic & without), or is there no difference between the three? ...
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1answer
41 views

Electromagnetic Shielding of radio waves

Would a radio wave beam (perhaps a cm in diameter) with the same frequency as ordinary AM or FM radio waves and also the same voltage (v/m) have the same skin depth for any metal utilised to shield ...
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2answers
55 views

Are wave fronts in double-slit experiments moving forward? [closed]

I ask a question about "What is a wavefront?" which follows the question "What makes the radiation behind a slit coherent". For the wavefront it was answered, that "In electromagnetics ...(that are) ...
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1answer
24 views

Does the wavefront in the double slit experiment represent the electric field of the EM radiation / light?

The question "What is a wavefront?" get the answer "A wavefront is a contiguous region of constant phase". This seems to be right for water waves as well as for electromagnetic radiation. But what is ...
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What is fundamentally happening that causes light to change its orientation when repeatedly polarized? (edited)

When light is passed through two polarizers successively, its intensity and orientation afterwards depends on the angle between the polarizers and the orientation of the most recent polarizer, ...