Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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12
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3answers
493 views

Is it really possible to “discover” the speed of light with a microwave oven?

I've seen a number of sites/videos online that describe a method for measuring the speed of light, using a microwave oven and a chocolate bar. For example, this video on youtube. The basic idea is to ...
1
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0answers
148 views

How did Maxwell conclude that light is an electromagnetic wave? [closed]

I was looking at the answers for "Why is light called an 'electromagnetic wave' if it's neither electric nor magnetic?", especially the answer by NikolajK that references a Wikipedia article and the ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

What would happen to the Earth's atmosphere if all the solar radiation was in the extreme ultraviolet?

According to this, our Earth's atmosphere is completely opaque to radiation with wavelengths less than 100 nm as this radiation has enough energy to ionize the air. Since the surface temperature of ...
2
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6answers
18k views

Why does a human body only emit infra red radiation and not other types of electromagnetic radiation?

What causes humans to emit infra red radiation and why don't we also emit other types of electromagnetic radiation such as ultra violet or microwave? Sunlight contains UV and our body takes it in, but ...
1
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1answer
78 views

Why phase velocity of light is slower in a dielectric than vacuum?

Why does light speed suffer a reduction when it passes through a homogeneous dielectric medium? I know my math says so, i.e.- a highly polarizable ($\chi$) medium is associated with high $\epsilon$ ...
0
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2answers
251 views

Do all the electromagnetic radiations have dual nature i.e. particle nature & wave nature?

I have studied the dual nature of the light as particle nature & wave nature. A photon of light energy can knock a single electron out of certain metals (usually having less ...
1
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1answer
37 views

Accelerating electric charge

We know that massive bodies attract gas clouds that become ionized and the resulting acceleration can emit very high energy photons. In a case where a proton for example is undergoing prolonged ...
2
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0answers
199 views

Is WiFi safe for humans? [closed]

I have WiFi on at my home almost all the time. I learned that the frequency of visible light is around several hundreds of THz, while the frequency of wifi is only several GHz, which is only ...
-1
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1answer
103 views

If photons have mass then how can they travel at speed of light? [closed]

Anything that has mass must be slower than speed of light. If they are travelling at speed of light they must contain infinite energy which should be able to destroy everything, clearly thats not ...
2
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3answers
327 views

What can change a photon's frequency?

I found this question: Is it possible to apply force to a light particle? As it states, gravity can change the frequency of light by changing its momentum. My question regards other phenomena that ...
4
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2answers
107 views

Can wifi signal reception be improved by opening a door? [closed]

Use Case A wifi user is in a different room than the router. The computer is having a hard time connecting and receiving the wifi signal. Engineering Question Can the wifi signal from the router to ...
2
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2answers
1k views

How much better is salt water at letting through microwaves than pure water?

Radio Wave Attenuation There are two general types of matter (substances) in the universe that affect electromagnetic waves, conductors and insulators which are called dielectrics by ...
1
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0answers
30 views

Confusion about radioactivity

The following question is from General Problems on Physics by I.E Irodov 6.220. Find the decay constant and the mean lifetime of $^{55}\operatorname{Co}$ radionuclide if its activity is known to ...
1
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0answers
59 views

Can TE and TM modes propagate together in a waveguide?

I recently came to understand the TE and TM modes. As it is defined that E=0 for transverse electric and vice-versa. I have a few basic questions in mind which I thought to ask in one thread only. ...
0
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2answers
103 views

How is frequency related to kinetic energy?

Does producing higher frequency waves require more energy than their low frequency counterparts with same amplitudes? For example, in electronics, would a 500 kHz wave require higher voltage to ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Why aren't EM waves directionless?

I've seen some descriptions of electromagnetic waves of late, almost comparing the wiggling an electron (or any charge) to the disturbing of a water surface, and as a result waves are formed that ...
3
votes
1answer
207 views

Refraction: Energy flow, tunneling and Evanescent EM waves

In the full internal reflection case where we have a refracted evanescent wave, If another object is nearby, then we could have wave tunneling phenomenon(frustrated total internal reflection). I am ...
0
votes
2answers
126 views

Why don't objects radiate off all of their heat energy?

Imagine a solid box in deep space. Solids are as far as I know constructed by positive nuclei in some sort of coherent structure, with electrons orbiting nearby too. Both the nuclei and the ...
11
votes
3answers
18k views

Why do lightbulbs continue to glow after the light is turned off?

I've noticed that whenever I turn the lamp off in my room at night, the lightbulb seems to continue to glow for a minute or so after that. It's not bright though; the only way I even notice it is if ...
0
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2answers
55 views

Defining charateristic of light wave?

"Light is refracted when it travels from one medium to another." Does the sentence show that light is a wave?
1
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1answer
69 views

Why do physicists use a positive sign for the Fourier kernel / outward propagating waves? [closed]

I am not a physicist but rather an engineer / mathematician, so I've always wondered why is it that physicists use the positive sign convention in the forward Fourier transform. That is, in all of my ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Why do photons travel?

Photons travel at the speed of light. Is there a known explanation of this phenomenon, and if yes, what is it? Edit: To be clearer, my question is why do photons travel at all. Why do they have a ...
3
votes
1answer
556 views

AM vs FM radio under bridges

I know what the difference between AM (Amplitude Modulation) and FM (Frequency Modulation) radios is. However, I noticed that when I drive under a bridge while listening to a station on AM, it just ...
-3
votes
2answers
69 views

What is electromagnetic radiation exactly? [closed]

What exactly is electromagnetic radiation? Other than the maths involved I'm not able to understand it at an intuitive level, can somebody please explain what it is?
0
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0answers
11 views

How do i calculate the “attenuation effect” that of a perforated aluminum sheet?

I am conducting an experiment test different configuration of perforated aluminum sheets. I am working with radio waves but i am having am hard time finding any equations or properties for this ...
1
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0answers
40 views

Poynting of EM field and group velocity

Could anyone please show me mathematically how the poynting vector of an EM field is always parallel to its group velocity? I do understand the physical reason why it has to be the case, but showing ...
0
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3answers
58 views

Emission of EM radiation from an electron

I have read about an electron making a transition between two energy levels and electromagnatic radiation will be emitted. The problem is how and why e.m radiation is emitted.
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0answers
54 views

Index of refraction for travelling EM wave problem

Let $n_1$ be the index of refraction of the first medium and $n_2$ be the index of the second medium. When $n_2>n_1$, then for an incident angle of $90^{\circ}$ we get a refracted light at a ...
11
votes
4answers
958 views

What direction does the evanescent wave point?

On wikipedia they say that the evanescent wave has a magnitude of: $$E=E_0 e^{\alpha y-j\beta x}$$ Where $j=\sqrt{-1}$, but what direction does this vector point in and why? (let us say the boundary ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Gaussian beam with its waist lying on medium boundary

For $z<0$ the medium is air and for $z<0$ the medium has refractive index $n$ The waist lies on the $z=0$ plane with radius $W_0$. What is the solution in the medium? I take the distribution ...
5
votes
1answer
210 views

Why is the wave equation so pervasive?

The homogenous wave equation can be expressed in covariant form as $$ \Box^2 \varphi = 0 $$ where $\Box^2$ is the D'Alembert operator and $\varphi$ is some physical field. The acoustic wave ...
0
votes
2answers
43 views

Photons reflecting off matter

When photons reflect off matter, do they always lose momentum to the object? If they lose momentum to the object, that means they lose energy, and so their frequency should decrease. However, when we ...
18
votes
2answers
5k views

How do microwaves heat moisture-free items?

Today I learnt that microwaves heat food by blasting electromagnetic waves through the water molecules found in the food. Does that mean food with 0% moisture (if such a thing exists - dried spices?) ...
2
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5answers
335 views

Why is diffraction related to wavelength, not amplitude?

For diffraction, the wavelength of the incident beam should be in range magnitude of the slit length, but why the isn't the amplitude related to the length of the slit?
4
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4answers
2k views

Do Electromagnetic Waves really propagate through continuous Induction?

I've often seen it said that in an Electromagnetic Wave the changing Electric Field component creates the Magnetic Field Component and the changing Magnetic Field Component in turn creates an Electric ...
23
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it (practically) possible for a large building to be a Faraday cage?

In my sophomore year of high school, my P.E. teachers kept on complaining about how phones didn't have a network connection in our gym, regardless of model, service provider, etc. A couple of feet ...
3
votes
1answer
10k views

Intensity of unpolarized light through polarizer

When unpolarized light is polarized with two polarizers, the intensity becomes $I=I_ocos^2(θ)$ (Malus's law). But when unpolarized light is polarized with only one polarizer, the intensity is reduced ...
0
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0answers
26 views

How long does it take for space dust to stop irradiating energy?

I heard that space dust is detectable because it irradiates on the infrared part of the spectrum? Does this happen forever? Won't it stop after some millions of years? Does it have to irradiate until ...
0
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0answers
30 views

What is the pure form of energy? [duplicate]

What is the pure form of energy? Einstein in his energy mass equation derivation said that electromagnetic radiation is pure form of energy.
1
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2answers
149 views

Gamma Ray Bursts

What is the maximum frequency of the Gamma Rays produced during supernovae? And how are these detected by telescopes without getting some serious damage done?
7
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0answers
123 views

Experimentally diminishing random errors for low wavelength UV observations

Part of the work that I do involves observations of solar low wavelength UV observations, specifically UV-B and UV-A II (up to 340nm). I have noticed that when I observe responses on a CCD or CMOS ...
7
votes
1answer
396 views

Orbital angular momentum of photon

People talk about orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons. Is there some physical example that cannot be explained without assuming that photons have non-zero OAM? Does different photons have ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

If UV radiation 1 cm away from the halogen bulb is equal to Sun's radiation, what is the level of radiation 1 meter away?

Halogen light bulbs emit some amount of UV radiation, and some sources consider them dangerous. Here it is written, that UV radiation (of certain types) from a particular halogen bulb was equal to the ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Linear vs. quadratic dispersion relation

In wave mechanics the dispersion relation between frequency $\omega$ and wave number $k$ is linear: $$\omega_n=c k_n$$ But in quantum mechanics, based on Schrödinger's equation, one can show that we ...
2
votes
1answer
404 views

Would there be EMF induced in our body due to electromagnetic radiations?

The experiments of innovative Faraday and Joseph Henry in USA, conducted around 1830, demonstrated conclusively that electric currents were induced in closed coils when subjected to changing magnetic ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

Understanding hollow waveguides. What is $\lambda_g$ on the figure?

I am trying to understand the field distribution in waveguides. On the figure is $HE_{12}$ mode of hollow fiber. What is the $\lambda_g$ ? Is it $\lambda_g$ = $\lambda_0$ / $n_{eff}$. Does the z ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Why wasn't the theory that light's velocity depended on its source very popular?

Before special relativity, it was believed that light having a specific velocity meant it had to travel through something. My question is, why wasn't the idea that light depended on its source very ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Make a semi transparent mirror with copper

The question: How would you make a semi transparent mirror (50% reflection, 50% transmission) with glass with a layer of copper. For light $\lambda$ = 500nm Try to be as realistic as possible What ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

Electromagnetic wave and intrinsic impedence [closed]

The electric field vector of an EM wave in free space is given by $$\bar E= \hat y [A\cos{\omega (t- \frac{z}{c}})]$$ where $ \hat y$ is the unit vector along the Y direction. What will be the ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Electric field vector in visualization of polarization of EM wave

When we were taught polarization at the high school level, we were told that during polarization, we should consider the EM wave being axially or planarly filtered (e.g. by a polarizing sheet with ...