Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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Why does a dielectric have a frequency dependent resistivity?

This question has come about because of my discussion with Steve B in the link below. Related: Why is glass much more transparent than water? For conductors, I can clearly see how resistivity ...
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123 views

How does a radiometric infrared camera estimate an objects temperature?

Say we have an infrared camera which measures some amount of radiation, in a spectral bandwidth which is given, between wavelength $\lambda_1$ and $\lambda_2$ from a perfect black body. How is it ...
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What do you call this “asymmetric polarization”?

I am considering this unusual polarization of EM waves: which travels in the x-direction and has magnetic and electric fields as shown. This can be produced by non-oscillatory currents. What name ...
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Why don't electrons return to their ground state immediately after photoexcitation? [duplicate]

In terms of photoluminescence, why don't the electrons, which have been excited by photons earlier, immediately fall down to their ground state and reemit a photon? In other words, why does ...
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What does an electromagnetic wave look like at a fixed moment in time?

I am curious what the electric and magnetic field's of light look like when time is stopped. A "photograph" or illustration/description of these fields at a moment in time is what I desire. Also, ...
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Energy in Electromagnetic Waves

Looking at diagrams of Electromagnetic Waves, it would appear to me that at certain times the waves have zero amplitude, and consequently zero energy. Indeed, substituting in the sinusoidal terms into ...
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239 views

Why doesn't an electromagnetic wave violate conservation of energy?

I'm starting to study electromagnetic waves and as i understand, an electromagnetic wave projects a varying electric field. This electric field can in turn give forces of repulsion/attractions to the ...
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Is there any example where electric and magnetic fields are not perpendicular?

Perpendicular electric and magnetic field creates light or other electromagnetic waves. Is it a necessary property to have a perpendicular fields? If not what would happen when the fields are not ...
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179 views

Proof that electric and magnetic fields in a EM wave are perpendicular

Is there a general proof, that for electromagnetic waves the magnetic and electric fields are perpendicular? The only ones I can find only focus on plane waves.
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Why does NASA use gold foil on equipment and gold-coated visors?

I've read several websites about equipment covered with gold foil and astronaut helmet visors are coated with gold. However, their explanations are devoid of almost all physics content. Can someone ...
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32 views

reflecting foil on window

Assumptions: A house window acts as a cavity resonator, and so can be treated as a blackbody. If the room temperature is 20 C then the outgoing radiation is 418 W/m2 If the outside temperature is ...
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29 views

Mosotti-Clausius formula from the first principles

I would like to understand how to get the Mosotti-Clausius formula for the dielectric susceptibility of a dielectric material with spherically symmetric molecules from the first principles, where by ...
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51 views

Why do aromatic rings absorb in UV?

Why do aromatic rings absorb in UV? I think that the whole molecule absorb light which causes transition of an electron to another molecule orbital.
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5answers
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Radio antenna producing waves in the visible spectrum

If a radio could produce waves in the visible light spectrum, what would the result be? This is a thought experiment that I've pondered for a few years now. I realize there are a few/many real-world ...
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115 views

Is there something equivalent to a diode for light?

In electronics a diode is a component allowing current passing in only one direction, and blocking the other side. I'm wondering if something similar exists for visible light or other EM waves, like ...
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Can light emit light?

How and why does the Huygens principle really work? I mean, does it always work? The Huygens principle: Every point on a wave-front may be considered a source of secondary spherical wavelets ...
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1answer
26 views

behavior of the electric field of an incoherent light wave

If I am not mistaken, an incoherent light wave is a light wave made out of waves with random phases: it consist of photons with random phases. Now I am wondering what we would see if we would ...
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69 views

How exactly dentists X-Ray works?

At dentist, before operation I got one tooth X-Rayed. I had to hold a small tablet inside my mouth and the scanner was positioned next to my cheek. The device look like this: How does this machine ...
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54 views

Time reversed Abraham-Lorentz reaction force

The Abraham-Lorentz radiation reaction force on a charged particle is given by: $$\mathbf{F_{rad}} = \frac{q^2}{6\pi\epsilon_0c^3}\mathbf{\dot{a}}$$ I understand the situation where one fires a ...
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119 views

Field Vectors and satisfying Maxwell's equations

If I have an electric field that its direction is parallel to the direction of the wave propagation, it will not satisfy Gauss's law for vacuum. However we can say it satisfies Gauss's law for ...
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330 views

Quantum Mechanics- Antenna emitting electromagnetic radiation

Radio signals are being transmitted in a frequency of $ 8.4 \times 10^9 \text{s}^{-1} $ and being received by an antenna that is capable of receiving power of $ 4 \times 10^{-21} \text{Watt} $ ($ 1 \, ...
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49 views

Extremely long wavelength electromagnetic radiation

High frequencies are used to eject electrons, because only electrons can really be affected at such a small wavelength scale. But could an electromagnetic wave have such a ridiculously low frequency ...
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3answers
135 views

Do electromagnetic fields are already present all over the space? [closed]

Consider a region $R$ in space without any source of electromagnetic field. Now put a source $S$ of electromagnetic wave in the vicinity of $R$ so that at time $t=0$, $S$ starts radiating ...
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2answers
241 views

What does an analog voice transmission look like in the visible spectrum?

Analog radio signals are transmitted using light in the radio area of the spectrum. If it was transmitted using the visible spectrum instead (using a visible light emitting device instead of a radio ...
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Low frequency electromagnetic waves

Some frequencies of electromagnetic waves are used for transmission of information, like radiowaves, microwaves, light, but some not.. What about Low Frequencies?: Perhaps low frequencies aren't ...
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How do I find the right lens for my laser?

I purchased this line laser recently and I'm running into a bit of an issue. The laser shoots out at a 120 degree angle which is perfect. However, once the laser spreads to about 4.25 inches, I need ...
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Why electrons can't radiate in their atoms' orbits?

It's an old-new question (I found only one similar question with unsatisfactory (for me) answer: Where did Schrödinger solve the radiating problem of Bohr's model?) It's strange for me how all books ...
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How to convert EM fields to EM waves?

How a body producing electricity and magnetic fields become a body radiating electromagnetic waves?
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1answer
59 views

Import of Celestial Effects on Satellite Radio Interference

Some internet (among other) infrastructure comprises satellites, which beam communications in radio frequencies. These satellites, to ground observers, appear as very small solid angles in the sky. ...
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424 views

why is advanced radiation absent?

the Lienard-Wiechert green functions have future and past null cones of radiation. Maxwell equations allow for a continuous range of mixtures between the retarded and advanced components, but we have ...
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57 views

EM waves and fields

According to wikipedia, electromagnetic waves are "synchronized oscillations of electric and magnetic fields that propagate at the speed of light". I understand what it means in theory. But in ...
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2answers
65 views

Typical energy of a solar flare

I read that solar flares are customarily viewed in H-alpha light, as a temporary brightening of a small portion of chromosphere. What all can be interpreted from this? Is it because, energy of the ...
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Why does light change direction when it travels through glass?

This was explained to me many years ago, by a physics teacher, with the following analogy: "If someone on the beach wants to reach someone else that is in the water, they will try to travel as much ...
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Force on a small conductor in an EM wave

What forces act on a small, flat conductor subjected to electromagnetic radiation, if the conductor is much smaller than the wavelength? My guess is that the magnetic field component of the wave ...
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1answer
60 views

Is a superconductor perfectly opaque?

Because of the Meissner effect, no magnetic fields can pierce through the body of a superconductor. Since EM waves need both their electric and magnetic field components, it cannot pierce through the ...
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Why does General Relativity predict more light deflection than Netwonian Physics?

If one looks at the limit as light's mass approaches zero, Newtonian Physics predicts a deflection of light (this can be seen by the fact that all objects are accelerate the same due to gravity.) ...
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45 views

Probe/Sensor-design for pulsed electromagnetic field

So I have a wire/coil, acting as a sender, which has a pulsed signal as described below. I would like to build a sensor/probe that can detect the electric field at a distance, where the primary goal ...
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4answers
250 views

What is an electromagnetic pulse?

Is an electromagnetic pulse a plain electromagnetic wave with one peak?
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1answer
130 views

Blackbody radiation in thermally inhomogeneous environment

The power radiated by the backbody is according to Stefan-Boltzmann law $$ P = \sigma \varepsilon A (T^4-T_{env}^{4} ).$$ Is the parameter $T_{env}$ supposed to be only the temperature in the near ...
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Why does change in speed of a wave make it refract?

When a light wave enters a medium with a higher refractive index (e.g. from air to standard glass) and its speed decreases, why does that make it refract/bend? I understand that wavelength decreases ...
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X-rays scattered at righ angles of the incident ones: are they polarised?

Basic books dealing with the interaction of X-rays with matter ussually don't mention anything about the polarisation, but I read somewhere that X-rays scattered in matter are linearly polarized, ...
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31 views

The Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral for plane waves?

A paper gives the following result on the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral for plane waves \begin{equation} \oint_{S_\infty}\left[p(\pmb{r}^\prime)\nabla G(\pmb{r},\pmb{r}^\prime)-\nabla ...
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802 views

How much better is salt water at letting through microwaves than pure water?

Radio Wave Attenuation There are two general types of matter (substances) in the universe that affect electromagnetic waves, conductors and insulators which are called dielectrics by ...
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68 views

Can kinetic energy in atoms result in emission of all types of EM radiation?

I already know the fact that when solid objects heat up, they emit thermal energy which is also known as infrared radiation. However, if the atoms in that solid were to begin gaining more or less ...
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Does the mediation of electric or magnetic force require distinct electron orbitals?

In the case of ordinary photons of light, matter interacts with light via electrons that orbit the nucleus. If the specific energy of a photon E = hv can be found in the atom as the energy difference ...
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5answers
135 views

Can a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) cause a blackout on Earth and why?

Can a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) cause a blackout on Earth and why is it so what's the relation between electro magnetic radiations and electrical and electronic appliance.what exactly does it do to ...
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1answer
204 views

Is it possible to “focus” a radio wave to target an area much smaller than its wavelength?

Recently I was reading about a technology that uses radio waves to stimulate neurons to fire. The radio waves have the advantage of being able to pass through the skull (hence being non-invasive) but ...
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Electromagnetic waves in vacuum

If there is no source then also there is electromagnetic waves described by Maxwell equation. how if there is no source then existence of EM waves. What gives energy to this EM waves. Is it vacuum ...
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Effect of varying distance of light source from a Light Dependant Resistor

I'm doing the experiment described here and I have a few questions about it. I have a miniature light dependent resistor (LDR) hooked to a multimeter set to $\Omega $ and a $25\,\mathrm W$ Light ...
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Is a suit that hides a soldier's heat signature fundamentally possible?

I recently played "Crysis", a game where the protagonist wears a suit that allows the player to hide both himself and his heat signature. Then I watched Iron Man 3, where a kid suggests that Tony ...