Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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3answers
122 views

Why don't X-rays/Gamma rays ionize all the atoms at the surface of a material?

Recently I've been wondering why certain materials are transparent or opaque to different wavelengths of light. The most common explanation for why a material, like glass, is transparent (in the ...
2
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1answer
273 views

Faraday rotation effect in circularly polarized waves?

We all know farady effect is observed in linearly polarized wave when it passes through a dielectric medium and magnetic field is along the direction of propagation. Is this phenomenon observable in ...
1
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1answer
58 views

Characteristic quantities in Fiber optics

I'm having trouble finding typical quantities in fiber optic communication. In particular, what kind of powers are generally used (or what is the minimum that fiber optics receivers can detect ...
1
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1answer
77 views

Admixtures of longitudinal and timelike photons!

In the quantization of electromagnetic field the physical states $|\psi\rangle$ are found to obey the following relation: $[a^{(0)}(k)-a^{(3)}(k)]|\psi\rangle=0$ It is explained as the physical ...
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1answer
85 views

Why polarization vector $= (0,1,i,0)$?

I know from CED that one has e.g. polarization $$\vec{E}(z,t) = \begin{bmatrix} e_{x} \\ e_{y} \\ 0 \end{bmatrix} \; e^{i(kz - 2 \pi f t)}. $$ Why do Peskin&Schroeder define a polarization ...
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1answer
77 views

How does a MRI use 20.1kW yet creates over 204K BTU/h? [closed]

I've been reading through a manual about MRI operating procedures for a large healthcare provider. The manual (written by Siemens) states that the MRI machines use 9kW in stand-by mode and 20.1kW ...
4
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1answer
182 views

Does the cavity magnetron in a microwave oven produce x-rays?

It seems like it should due to bremsstrahlung, since we're talking about electrons with 5-7KeV of energy slamming into the walls of the device, but I've found no information about this online, so I'm ...
3
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3answers
586 views

Temperature behavior over time of black or white cars in hot, sunny regions

How does the color of a car influence its inner temperature change over time when parked outside in windless, hot and sunny regions? I know what's the common idea about that: black cars are supposed ...
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0answers
68 views

Dynamic light scattering of rods at low q

In dynamic light scattering (DLS), I understand that for spherical particles it is their diffusive motions which cause the intensity fluctuations that are correlated. And that the scattering vector ...
2
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1answer
519 views

Physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and origin of EM waves

Is it possible to describe the physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and show how they lead to electromagnetic wave, with little involvement of mathematics ?
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1answer
38 views

Import of Celestial Effects on Satellite Radio Interference

Some internet (among other) infrastructure comprises satellites, which beam communications in radio frequencies. These satellites, to ground observers, appear as very small solid angles in the sky. ...
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1answer
81 views

Can an EM wave be represented in terms of dipole?

The direction of propagation is represented by a line. A positive charge moves along this line at velocity c. A negative charge moves along a line that is perpendicular to the direction of propagation ...
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4answers
119 views

Why does special relativity talk about the speed of light in a vacuum?

What's the importance of the speed of light being in a vacuum? Does not being in a vacuum cause a difference?
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1answer
45 views

Why does black get heated the most? [duplicate]

I found out black heats up the most and white the least, as I expected. The question I had is that despite black reflecting all the wavelengths of the visible spectrum, and hence giving the black ...
0
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2answers
101 views

Geiger meter affected by plasma lamp

Whilst testing a geiger meter I took it near a plasma globe (the type sold in party/toy stores). The meter showed 0.13 mcSv/h. Then I turned the lamp on and low and behold the meter jumped to 0.89 ...
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1answer
92 views

Why can TV broadcasts send such large amounts of data(photorealism) and a PC cant

Firstly I think I am right in saying that TV broadcast are sent via electromagnetic waves which means they are sent via photons, how is that even possible? And then the main questions, how can you ...
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0answers
50 views

Spatial light modulation for mode multiplexing, how does it work?

If a laser light becomes spatial phase modulated (by phase only spatial light modulator) what happens to the intensity distribution and frequency spectrum of the laser light ? I know that this ...
3
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2answers
144 views

What is the energy distribution of light if it has an infinite length?

What is the energy distribution of light if it has an infinite length? I have read in one of the answers here on phys.SE that light has actually an infinite length. But then what is the energy ...
9
votes
3answers
627 views

Do particle accelerators produce (dangerous) radiation?

I was under the impression that particle accelerators were pretty harmless, but some article said that they produce harmful radiation when you're in the tunnel. Given that the Internet... isn't always ...
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2answers
86 views

Do acousto-optic modulators shift the frequency of the diffracted beams?

Today I read an introduction on an optical device called an acousto-optic modulator, which is used in many optical experiments. It is the first time I have heard of this element. The material showed ...
2
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1answer
62 views

Why electric field has a major role in vision?

Although the electromagnetic wave is made op of both electric and magnetic fields the electric field contributes much in vision and is thus, called the light vector. But, why is it that the electric ...
0
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2answers
133 views

What would give us more heat ? infrared or microwaves?

As we know that our body is made up mostly of water and the frequency of vibration of water molecules matches that of microwaves which is the working principle of microwave ovens. When we come in ...
2
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2answers
708 views

Why does noise affect FM radio less than AM?

Frequency modulated waves are less susceptible to noise compared to amplitude modulated signal. This is because the information in an FM signal is transmitted through varying the frequency, and not ...
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2answers
240 views

Why do waves diffract?

There have already been a lot of questions on this site on diffraction but I still believe this one might be slightly different. In electromagnetic waves, diffraction and any other phenomenon of wave ...
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0answers
68 views

Do I understand measurement of dispersion relation in a solid correctly?

I'm currently doing an introduction to solid state physics course and have a quick question about measurement of the dispersion relation of phonons in a solid: The way I understood it is the ...
0
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2answers
189 views

Does a HDD ( Hard Disk Drive) emit radio waves?

While I was reading the "guide" of a HDD I had bought a while ago, I found that it might emit radio waves. I was wondering if that is true and why that happens?
4
votes
2answers
624 views

Why do electromagnetic waves oscillate?

I've been considering this question, and found many people asking the same (or something similar) online, but none of the answers seemed to address the core point or at least I wasn't able to make ...
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2answers
88 views

Electromagnetic radiation lenses

This will probably be a very basic question, but looking for a simple answers. What I know the visible light is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a defined wavelength. the full spectrum ...
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2answers
215 views

Is it physically possible to convert matter into the electromagnetic spectrum (specifically x-rays)? [closed]

I was considering the problem with teleporting organic matter, and was curious to know if I can use this to avoid killing anything I teleport?
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1answer
34 views

Diffraction from interatomic spacing

In diffraction from a single slit, we learn that the angular width of the central maxima, is given by $2\sin^{-1}\frac \lambda d$. For $d\approx \lambda$, the incoming wavefront should be spread to ...
2
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2answers
258 views

Does AC current produce EM waves?

Does AC current in simple wires produce electromagnetic waves? AC current entails very rapid changes in polarity and therefore the electrons in the metal will feel rapidly changing forces which should ...
0
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0answers
71 views

Edison effect for incandescent bulb?

I would like to ask a question on incandescent light. From the Thermionic emission (Edison effect), heated tungsten filament emits electrons that could be collected by an anode (like a foil ...
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2answers
263 views

Do electromagnetic waves always move in straight lines?

When we send an electromagnetic short wave to the sky, it reflects due to the ionosphere effects. But if we send it horizontally, is it correct that it moves around the surface of the earth, and if it ...
0
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0answers
154 views

How much energy does the most powerful supernova release in any form other than neutrinos?

I have read most of the supernova article on wikipedia, and there are a lot of numbers and different types of supernovae so I am confused. What I need to know is how much energy is released from some ...
3
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1answer
95 views

Polarisation of light is a wave concept or applicable to photons as well?

I have a very fundamental question. We explain polarisation of light assuming wave nature of light. Is it still valid if we assume light as photons? Or in other words, polarisation is a wave concept ...
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0answers
60 views

Problem with relativity of acceleration

In this answer http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/92833/36977 John said that acceleration is not relative in the general theory of relativity. But this is a problem: as we all know, accelerating ...
6
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7answers
358 views

Is the sun's solar radiance spectrum matching up with water's absorption spectrum just coincidence?

People frequently point out that water has a pretty narrow range in which it isn't very absorbing of light, reaching a minimum at a wavelength of about 500nm: And that our eyes have made good use ...
0
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1answer
71 views

Young's DS experiment and most light sources

The reason why two independent bulbs cannot be used to create the young's two slit interference pattern is that the phase difference between those two sources varies very rapidly and therefore, the ...
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0answers
42 views

Is it physically realistic to have an electric field and polarisation density but no displacement field?

Given a Lagrangian density that describes a classical dielectric in interaction with the EM field, I found the Euler-Lagrange equations, and in the case of the electric field, worked through to find ...
3
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1answer
82 views

When was it established light travels forever?

The range of electromagnetic radiation is indefinite. When was that established? Doesn't Hubble's limit have an effect?
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0answers
58 views

Hidden momentum

I'm trying to learn about hidden momentum. After reading what I could find with a google search, I understand that it is equal to the momentum carried by radiation, calculated with the Poynting ...
0
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1answer
50 views

What electromagnetic wave produces the strongest electrical current when making contact with an element?

More specifically, what electromagnetic waves can we utilize to generate electrical power and out of those waves, which one would produce the most power? Additionally, which one would be the most ...
2
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1answer
100 views

Can two spools shield you effectively against radiation

a friend of mine thinks that by buying a product called rayguard he can effectively shield against electrosmog. On the website, there are multiple evidences that this might work. However the product ...
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0answers
23 views

Electromagnet emitting light [duplicate]

We all know that (visible for human) light essentially is an electromagnetic wave with a frequency around 1/((any value between 380 and 760)*pow(10,9)) Hertz. So, if we will build (hypothetically) ...
0
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2answers
109 views

What would happen if an incredibly high energy photon passed through a human body?

What would happen if an incredibly high energy photon passed through a human body (or any other material)? When I say incredibly high energy photon, I mean higher than any known energy scales... ...
4
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2answers
126 views

Does the photon emitted by an electron falling to a lower energy level have a direction?

When an electron falls from an energy state to a lower one, electromagnetic radiation is emitted. Is this equally emitted in all directions (as a spherical wave) and can we only give it a direction ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant vs refractive index?

So for a complex dielectric constant $\epsilon = \epsilon_a + i\epsilon_b$, the wave vector and index of refraction are related to it through $k = \frac{\omega}{c}n$ and $n = \sqrt{\frac{\mu ...
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1answer
77 views

What kind of damage is expected to happen to the earth in case of being hit by a direct gamma ray burst?

I understand how the ozone layer would be quickly depleted and the UV radiation from the sun would reach the ground...etc I understand all this, but what confuses me is where all this huge amount of ...
0
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1answer
431 views

Can electron exist as a standing wave inspite of successive superposition?

With the development of quantum mechanics, it was found that the orbiting electrons around a nucleus could not be fully described as particles, but needed to be explained by the wave-particle duality. ...
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1answer
63 views

Cause of radiation resistance

I was reading Radiation Damping and light scattering from Feynman's lectures on physics. The following excerpts are from chapter 32, Vol I What is this radiation resistance due to? Let us take a ...