Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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The energy of an electron in a time-dependent electric field

Is energy of an electron in a time-dependent electric field any different from the one in a static field? Why did D.Griffith state in his "Intro to QM"( when he discussed the perturbation of EM waves ...
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65 views

Electromagnetic radiation bending on Earth

Most articles say that a radiowave is able to propagate itself beyond the horizon because it is reflected off by the ionosphere (and the Earth itself). But do radio waves also get bent according to ...
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2answers
75 views

Solution of one dimensional wave equation by variable separation method

When solving the One dimensional wave equation by variable separable method, we equate left-hand side and right-hand side to a constant which is negative in nature. Why has the constant be only ...
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76 views

Does a rotating DC motor near a TV affects the signals coming in the TV?

In my TV cable the signals were quite noisy so i cut the wire and hanged both the wire parallel to each other. Then the signals became very clear and everything was going alright. Once I was ...
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104 views

Non-polarised light

We know the beam of light oscillates in electric field and magnetic field, both perpendicular to both the wave of propagation and each other. What does, however, a non-polarised beam of light look ...
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852 views

Can polarized light be unpolarized again?

I was just wondering if there could be a process that could unpolarize polarazied light. Is that possible?
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35 views

How are different wavelength components collected by the same detector in a spectrometer?

Let's think, we have a detector array (128x1 and each CMOS detector responds 400 to 1000 nm TSL1401CL that way, each detector has 4.6875 nm interval). Then, basically in a spectrometer a prism reflect ...
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119 views

Plane waves - EM wave

An accelerating electric charge will emit transverse electromagnetic waves. These waves are propagating away in wave fronts that become flatter and flatter as getting further from the source. So they ...
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2k views

How can light carry data if light has no mass, and data has mass?

Via a packet-switched network, like the internet, data is sent as packets (bits) wirelessly via radio waves with Wi-Fi, or 802.11g, etc. What my question is is this: Radio waves are light; light has ...
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67 views

Does reflected light change LED power consumption?

If I enclose an LED in "tin foil" so that the photons it gives off are reflected back to it, would the power consumed by the LED go down?
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3answers
76 views

Negative frequency contributions for very short pulses?

I am wondering if very short optical light pulses can have a Gaussian envelope? When I describe the pulse shape with a Gaussian than the frequency distribution has also a Gaussian shape. But if the ...
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1answer
43 views

Subtraction In Quadrature?

I have a system of particles (electrons) with an initial RMS energy spread (say "1"). It goes through a section of constant magnetic field (bend magnet) and the electrons radiate. The electrons lose ...
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2answers
136 views

Why don't X-rays travel through water?

Why don't X-rays travel through water? I read that X-Rays don't travel through water, but what is the main reason? See this link:http://henke.lbl.gov/optical_constants/ it shows X-ray transmission ...
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163 views

Why Light isn't like an Acoustic wave?

I just wanted to know why light isn't an Acoustic wave.Is it because light wave doesn't obey acoustic properties?
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3k views

How do microwaves heat moisture-free items?

Today I learnt that microwaves heat food by blasting electromagnetic waves through the water molecules found in the food. Does that mean food with 0% moisture (if such a thing exists - dried spices?) ...
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3answers
877 views

What is meant by the temperature of the CMB?

This is what I commonly read: The CMB came to existence when atoms where formed and photons weren't constantly absorbed anymore. In other words, the universe became "transparent". Because of the ...
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2answers
3k views

Wavelength dependent refractive index

I read in a book about optical fibers that the different spectral components of a light pulse transmitted in the fiber propagate with different velocities due to a wavelength dependent refractive ...
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2answers
62 views

Do I need to convert units to be compatible with constants?

I want to calculate the wavelength of radiation given its energy. I know I need to use $E=h f$ and $f = c / \lambda$. All I'm given is $E = 20 \text{ keV}$, now my true question is: Do I use $E = ...
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96 views

Electromagnetic interaction physical interpretation [duplicate]

Why do radio waves, X-ray and gamma rays penetrate through matter? Can anyone explain me this in terms of incident energy or wavelength of the photon and the effective cross-section that these photons ...
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1answer
130 views

Stimulated emission direction

Place a sub-micron clump of crystal violet molecules in front of a multipixel detector. Raise the molecules to an electronically excited state with a beam of 590 nm light, illuminating from the side ...
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710 views

Electromagnetic waves should stop while encountering a conducting shell?

I am a high school student who has just started reading elementary electromagnetism and am a completely beginner in this subject. I have read in books that EM waves are nothing but sinusoidal ...
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4answers
4k views

Why do prisms work (why is refraction frequency dependent)?

It is well known that a prism can "split light" by separating different frequencies of light: Many sources state that the reason this happens is that the index of refraction is different for ...
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3answers
335 views

Does light change phase on refraction?

I have seen a lot about when light undergoes a phase change when it is reflected. But does it undergo a phase change when refracted and if so why and if not why not?
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1answer
2k views

Does the absence of a sound particle indicate that there are no photons?

Sound is usually referred to as just "sound waves" - we do not talk about a "sound particle" and only as a wave or "matter wave." Could something similar apply to light i.e. that there really is no ...
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Can radio waves be formed into a pencil beam?

Laser beams are said to have high "spatial coherence". This means that the beam is highly concentrated even at long distances (low spread). Can this be achieved with radio waves (much longer waves) ...
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2answers
2k views

Does infrared rays pass through polarized glass?

Actually I had asked in another post that "Does infrared rays pass through active shutter glass" but someone just commented that infrared rays dont pass through polarized glass. If infrared rays ...
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1answer
69 views

Why is $B=\frac{1}{\omega} k\times E$?

Why can we derrive from $B=\frac{k}{\omega}|E|$ the formula $B=\frac{1}{\omega} k\times E$ ? Obviously, because they are perpendicular, but why is it mathematically legitimate?
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Is the de Broglie wavelength of a photon equal to the EM wavelength of the radiation?

Is the de Broglie (matter) wavelength $\lambda=\frac{h}{p}$ of a photon equal to the electromagnetic wavelength of the radiation? I guess yes, but how come that photons have both a matter wave and an ...
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1answer
65 views

Is it physically realistic to have an electric field and polarisation density but no displacement field?

Given a Lagrangian density that describes a classical dielectric in interaction with the EM field, I found the Euler-Lagrange equations, and in the case of the electric field, worked through to find ...
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2answers
497 views

Difference between electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and Electromagnetic Field?

I'm a freshly graduated electrical engineer. One course that I really struggled with was Field Theory, because it was a lovely assortment of vector calculus and things that were explained to me well ...
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1k views

Complex numbers in optics

I have recently studied optics. But I feel having missed something important: how can amplitudes of light waves be complex numbers?
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2answers
2k views

What is the minimum wavelength of electromagnetic radiation?

As a first approximation, I don't see how a wavelength of less than 2 Planck distances could exist. The question is: Are there any other limits that would come into play before that? For example: ...
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187 views

Smallest Wavelength of light possible? [duplicate]

I was thinking about blue-shifting of light and I couldn't help my self but think about the limits of blue shifting mechanism and since we know energy of a photon is directly proportional to the ...
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1answer
71 views

Absorption of waves in a plasma

Suppose a plasma has characteristic frequency $\omega_p$. Since $$n = \sqrt{\left(1-\frac{\omega_p^2}{\omega^2}\right)} $$ For $\omega<\omega_p$, the refractive index will be imaginary - which ...
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171 views

What is the relationship between Faraday cage mesh size and attenuation of cell phone reception signals?

This is related to the question how can electromagnetic waves reach a cell phone in faraday cage?, where in the answer it was stated that the holes (=size of the mesh) would need to be smaller than ...
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1answer
57 views

Why are laser pulses Sech Squared in temporal shape?

Ultrashort pulses from mode-locked lasers often have a temporal shape which can be described with a squared hyperbolic secant ($\mathrm{sech}^2$) function: $$ P(t)=P_0 \mathrm{sech}^2 \left( ...
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Why does a remote car key work when held to your head/body?

I was trying to unlock my car, but I was out of range. A friend of mine said that I have to hold the transmitter next to my head. It worked, so I tried the following later that day: Walked away from ...
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83 views

Help understanding Fizeau's calculation of speed of light

While searching for different methods of calculating Speed of light, I came across one of the methods that Fizeau discussed below which I cannot fully understand. In short, in Fizeau’s apparatus, a ...
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1answer
50 views

polarization of a transverse wave travelling in ionosphere with polarization direction perpendicular to earths magnetic field

Assume a transverse electromagnetic wave entering ionosphere such that its Electric field of wave is perpendicular to earths magnetic field. Now, i read that as it will enter plasma, the wave will ...
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1answer
45 views

How did the Huygens probe use EM waves to measure wind speeds on Titan?

In the Wikipedia's article on Huygens spacecraft, it was mentioned that one of the experiments was to measure the wind speeds on Titan by Doppler wind experiment. To quote the exact lines, it was ...
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20 views

Why do we assign an electric field vector to an EM wave when photons have zero charge? [duplicate]

In the standard model photons have no charge. So how can en EM wave be given a quantity of electric field to do work on electrons in say a RF antenna. What excites the electrons? I may have parts of ...
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27 views

Ground influence on 434 MHz radio signal

I have read in a paper that ground acts as reflector for radio signals in 434 MHz band. Why is that the case?
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45 views

How did Rayleigh and Jeans apply the Equipartition of Energy in determining the energy distribution of blackbody - radiation? [duplicate]

I am reading the Ultraviolet Catastrophe and have come across this law. Here , it is written They applied the statistical physics method to the waves by analogy with Maxwell's gas particles using ...
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44 views

Does the total energy in an electromagnetic field depend on the acceleration of the sources?

If I accelerate a charge from rest to some velocity $\vec v$, does the total final electromagnetic energy contained in the field depend upon the acceleration of the charge?
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1answer
38 views

How does the density of states for black-body radiation change with geometry?

If I have a hollow conducting cylinder with another conducting cylinder inside it (as with a coaxial cable), would the density of states of the photons/radiation between the two cylinders be any ...
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50 views

Is radar cross section the same as scattering cross section?

There is a quantity known as scattering cross section which is given as a function of frequency. It means the ratio of the scattered power by the particle to the ratio of the incident power on the ...
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16 views

Tunable ferroelectric material

Is there any tunable ferroelectric (whose permittivity changes by applying electric field) material for visible or near IR applications?
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2answers
3k views

Why do electromagnetic waves oscillate?

I've been considering this question, and found many people asking the same (or something similar) online, but none of the answers seemed to address the core point or at least I wasn't able to make ...
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1answer
51 views

Defining photons

I've read every book for my course and all of them describe photons as wave-packets/"bursts" of the EM wave. I just can't appreciate this view of photons. From what I've gathered on photons: Photons ...
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Why and how is the speed of light in vacuum constant, i.e., independent of reference frame?

I was told that the Galilean relative velocity rule does not apply to the speed of light. No matter how fast two objects are moving, the speed of light will remain same for both of them. How and why ...