Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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2
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1answer
63 views

Electric charge of light? [duplicate]

Light (or any radiation as a matter of fact) is an electromagnetic wave so why doesn't it have a electric charge associated with it? As far as I know only static or flowing electric chargers can ...
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1answer
75 views

Is the photon first a wave, then a particle? [duplicate]

When the 'photon' is emitted, it would reason that the result of the energy fluctuation that creates 'it' rather is created as an energy wave, which when measured by us or a surface, it 'becomes' as a ...
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2answers
58 views

Internal energy and photon absorption

I just wish to confirm whether my understanding is correct. I know that photon absorption/emission brings about quantised changes in electron energy levels. Photons (infrared) also interact with ...
0
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2answers
66 views

How hot particles can get [duplicate]

One way in which an object is affected by temperature rise is that the wavelength of the radiation it emits is gets smaller and smaller. Another way of looking at it is that as an object gets hotter, ...
3
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2answers
79 views

Blackbody radiation through quantum mechanics perspective

While explaining black body radiation, the body is assumed as a cavity radiator and the radiations are due to the oscillating electrons. But we know that the electromagnetic radiation emitted is ...
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2answers
480 views

Is data which rides on the carrier frequency dangerous?

My understanding of broadcasting data via electromagnetic radition is, that the data "rides" on a carrier frequency on which it is radiated. I am aware of the fact, that those carrier frequencies are ...
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1answer
61 views

Can we multiply an electromagnetic field?

can we multiply light by a sequence of reflections in a closed vessel? also, is light a part of EM wave? can we multiply the radio wave or EM wave from a transformer?
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0answers
18 views

Can various wavelengths participate in C/D Interference?

My question is can multiple wavelengths or at least two different wavelengths interfere with one another? I know that they usually have to be the 'same' wavelength, but you'd think they can vary a bit ...
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1answer
146 views

If sound travels through matter what medium does light travel through? [duplicate]

So sound is a wave and is basically just vibrations, an atom vibrates causing another next to it vibrate and so on until it finally reaches our ears to become sound. If that's normally how waves ...
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2answers
59 views

Parallel electric and magnetic field in traveling wave

Can we have elctromagnetic waves which are characterized by parallel electric and magnetic field $\vec{E} || \vec{B}$ ? I am not talking here about free space, but maybe some kind of materials or ...
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2answers
76 views

Why group velocity represents energy or information transmission? What relation between phase velocity and special relativity

I have two question, why group velocity represents energy or information transmission? what is the relation between phase velocity and Special relativity: why can it exceed C without violation of ...
2
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1answer
523 views

Dark matter a medium for light propagation

Is dark matter a candidate to fill void left by luminiferous ether as a medium for light travel?
2
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1answer
49 views

What does a supernova look like at its peak luminosity?

I know that in some types of supernovae, the cause of the increased luminosity is the radioactive decay of certain elements ejected during the explosion, so a question came to my mind. If the ejected ...
4
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1answer
686 views

What is the meaning of this “let there be light” joke?

A middle school teacher across the restaurant is wearing this shirt, and I certainly don't get it.
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1answer
100 views

How to calculate the differential scattering cross section?

I am doing some simulations with the Meep code to study some properties of a metal nanoparticle. The situation is this: an incident electromagnetic wave on a metal nanoparticle. By now I know how to ...
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1answer
57 views

What would a laser beam's E-M waves actually look like if you zoomed in?

I am trying to understand how a real world beam of laser actually reflects the physics description of oscillating electromagnetic waves. So say we are looking side on at a vertically polarized laser ...
3
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1answer
125 views

Why would a rotating charged sphere not have time varying electric field?

I have seen Gauss Law being used for a uniformly charged hollow sphere rotating with $\omega$. How is that valid to use Gauss law since it is an electrostatic law and if it is valid, why do we get a ...
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1answer
33 views

The difference between EMR and lone Electric and Magnetic fields

I fail to understand the true difference between EMR and electric and magnetic fields. When current flows, there is an electric field due to the electron flow and a magnetic field, however no EMR ...
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1answer
98 views

Why does the second Weyl scalar describe electromagnetic radiation?

I've been reading about the null tetrad, the Weyl tensor, and the Newman-Penrose identities, and so I found out about the Weyl scalars. While the zeroth, first, third, and fourth scalars describe ...
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2answers
102 views

Angular momentum of light

Can someone explain the classical angular momentum in electromagnetic theory of light? If I shine elliptically polarised em wave on a black disc it rotates. I would like to know how to calculate ...
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3answers
186 views

Visualisation of formation of electromagnetic waves [duplicate]

Recently I am studying electromagnetic waves, and I am wondering why it is formed by acceleration of electric charges? Can the EM waves be formed by other movements of electric charges, such as at a ...
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4answers
191 views

Sequence of E and B field in radio waves and in single photons

In antenna technology we distinguish between nearfield and widefield. In the nearfield the electric and the magnetic fields are shifted by 90°. If you look closer you can see that there are two ...
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0answers
65 views

Poynting Vector Volume Integral Inside a Cavity

Given an electromagnetic wave in resonance mode in a vacuum cavity inside a perfect conductor, on the boundary, the parallel component of $E$ field vanishes, and the perpendicular of component of $B$ ...
5
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2answers
179 views

Which electromagnetic radiation is faster in water, microwaves or light?

Well I've been asked this question, but I haven't been able to come with an answer yet using books and some web searches. The point is as the title says, to answer the question with the whole ...
2
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1answer
53 views

Accelerating masses lose energy?

If I understand this correctly, accelerating charges lose energy in the form of EM waves because they change the electric and magnetic fields, which "costs" energy. Does that mean that accelerating ...
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0answers
27 views

Band-limited double-step Fresnel diffraction for images with radio waves?

Is it possible to use band-limited double-step Fresnel diffraction to assemble a holographic image with radio waves? If not is there a simular principle?
2
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2answers
59 views

Why do the electron in Bohr's principal quantum levels or ground state do not emit radiation? [duplicate]

Bohr said that only certain orbits of definite energy are allowed inside the atom. He said that the electrons in their ground state do not emit radiation and that they will emit radiation when they ...
2
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3answers
155 views

What exactly is Electromagnetic Radiation?

I don't understand how and why the electric and magnetic fields oscillate in the electromagnetic radiation wave, and any way where do these fields originate from, for there are no charged particles in ...
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3answers
154 views

Why does $\nabla \to ik$ when you Fourier transform?

I am reading a text that describes the scattering of light by a particle with dielectric constant $\epsilon$ After a bit of maths starting from Maxwell's equations they obtain: $$\nabla (\nabla ...
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2answers
175 views

Finding the cosmological redshift of a galaxy in the expanding Universe

Firstly, I understand what the Doppler effect is when it comes to sound or light waves. From everything that I've read, we are told that the universe is constantly expanding since the all the ...
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1answer
50 views

Electromagnetic fields and human behaviour

To what extent does electromagnetic fields and/or radiation from space have influence on human behaviour and/or physiology?
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85 views

Acceleration of a unit vector in the Feynman Lectures

In the Feynman Lectures on Physics chapter 28, Feynman explains the radiation equation $$\vec{E}=\frac{-q}{4\pi\epsilon_0 c^2}\, \frac{d^2\hat{e}_{r'}}{dt^2}$$ The unit vector $\hat{e}_{r'}$ is ...
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1answer
44 views

Is it possible that matter/antimatter collisions emit resonance frequencies of H/He?

Is it possible that matter/antimatter collisions emit resonance frequencies of H/He? I am researching a high energy phenomenon that occurs between the frequencies of 1200-1580 MHz. This come from a ...
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0answers
40 views

What is the relationship between the electric field E and the magnetic field (aka magnetic flux density, magnetic induction) B of a single photon? [duplicate]

I'm looking for a formula for light, for example with 660 nm wavelength, which describes the maximum of the amplitudes for the wavelength of the electric and the magnetic field of the propagating ...
6
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3answers
725 views

Why can't light penetrate solid objects?

Light is combination of perpendicular electric and magnetic fields, since electric fields penetrate a conductor, why can't light travel in them? I think my argument does sound stupid, but I can't ...
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0answers
26 views

Refractive index variation with colors [duplicate]

To explain the spectrum formation in the prism, my teacher said that different colors have different speeds in a medium, so, refractive index is different for all. So, angle is different. But I don't ...
2
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1answer
100 views

Why does the speed of the Electromagnetic wave in the material depend on the frequency of the wave where as they are constant in vacuum (freespace)? [duplicate]

I am confused on why would the propagation speed of any EM waves at ANY frequency is constant in the free space (vacuum) but they seem to disperse in any other materials as the propagation speed of EM ...
2
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3answers
577 views

How does the movement of electrons produce radio waves?

I'm mostly wondering about radio frequencies. I understand that voltage is the movement of electrons, and that the antenna acts as a light bulb, emitting at radio frequencies, following the reverse ...
12
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1answer
531 views

Why is Huygens' principle only valid in an odd number of spatial dimensions?

Apparently Huygens' principle is only valid in an odd number of spatial dimensions: http://mathoverflow.net/a/5396/21349 Huygen's principle in curved spacetimes Why is this? [EDIT] This is ...
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2answers
154 views

Huygen's principle in curved spacetimes

Does Huygen's principle hold in even dimensional (2m+1,1) curved spacetimes, or are there certain necessary conditions for it to hold? In other words, if I have Cauchy data for a field satisfying the ...
11
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4answers
2k views

Is it possible to shield a camera so as to record from the inside of a running microwave oven?

Would it be possible to create shielding for a camera, allowing it record food being cooked from the vantage point of the inside of a consumer microwave oven without the camera being damaged? ...
4
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3answers
131 views

In scattering, how does a particle 'know' which direction it is being illuminated from?

In scattering experiments, for example light scattering, the scattering strength from different sized particles is depicted as below. What I can't understand is: how does a particle know which ...
3
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0answers
141 views

Free charge movement in an electric field - including bremsstrahlung

Let us imagine a free, negatively charged object that is in rest and placed in an elecric field of a point positive charge. The positive charge has a huge mass and cannot move, so we consider only the ...
3
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2answers
125 views

Physical reason why (hot) objects glow? [duplicate]

Every object at a non-zero temperature radiates light, i.e. it glows. (Is that called blackbody radiation?) What is the physical reason to this? Is it because more heat implies that the atoms ...
14
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4answers
2k views

Is the frequency of light restricted?

What are the factors that limit the frequency of light? Can it have wavelengths ranging between zero and infinity?
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0answers
14 views

Where does $R/\gamma^3$ come from in relativistic E&M?

I am starting to read many papers on electron beam physics; more specifically its motion in a magnet i.e. curved motion. The term $R/\gamma^3$ comes up a lot, but I don't know where they are coming ...
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1answer
137 views

Massless particles and the speed of light - New? Theories of existence [closed]

"The best understanding we have is that it [light] is a disturbance in the electromagnetic fields of charged bodies." http://einstein.stanford.edu/content/relativity/q212.html This is a link to the ...
5
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2answers
124 views

Radiation emission and absorption

Any object can emit and absorb radiation and the power of emission can be represented by the Stefan-Boltzmann law: $$P=A\epsilon\sigma T^4$$ In many texts the net power radiated is the difference ...
1
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1answer
63 views

If light was able to pass through a wall, would the wall be invisible to the human eye? [closed]

In addition, to get light to other side of the wall, could it be converted to radio waves and then back to light waves? Edit: My idea was if there was a special material that was painted on both ...
17
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3answers
4k views

How would an X-ray scanner identify a mirror?

A mirror is under normal circumstance used to reflect Electromagnetic radiation also known as photons (light) and in airport security or medical facilities, they use X-rays to detect anomalies inside ...