Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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light travels a maximum speed… /? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it possible for information to be transmitted faster than light? we know that speed of light is an unconquerable term in physics..light takes about 1 year to travel ...
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2answers
472 views

Working of a crystal radio

I have been reading about how a crystal radio works and I have one question below: It says, the energy in form electric current from a specific frequency will be stored in the coil (or a resonator) ...
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6answers
15k views

How many colors exist?

How many "colors" do exist? Our perception: As far as I know, colors are just different frequencies of light. According to wikipedia, we can see wavelengths from about 380 nm und 740 nm. This means ...
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3answers
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Why don't electromagnetic waves require a medium?

As I understand it, electromagnetic waves have two components which are the result of each other, i.e., when a moving electric charge creates a changing magnetic field at point X then a changing ...
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1answer
2k views

How does a receiving antenna get an induced electric current?

From this question, I've noted that an electromagnetic field carries no electric charge but it has two components: Electric field Magnetic field Now what I failed to understand is how does the ...
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2answers
4k views

Why do electromagnetic waves become weaker with distance?

From what I know, In electromagnetic waves, the components electric field and magnetic field generate each other i.e. magnetic field generated from moving electric charge generates another electric ...
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0answers
147 views

What narrow-linewidth laser system runs at 2100nm with 1W of power?

For an experiment at our university we need a laser that runs at about 2.1 μm (about 20nm higher or lower would be fine too. We have found a multitude of lasers that achieve this (typically Thulium- ...
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3answers
5k views

How much electric charge do electromagnetic waves carry?

Since electromagnetic waves have both electric and magnetic field components, which oscillate in phase perpendicular to each other and perpendicular to the direction of energy propagation. How much is ...
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4answers
6k views

How does radio receives signal from particular station?

When you tune your radio (digital or analog) to receive say 100 MHz frequency and while in the environment there are hundreds of channels everywhere around the radio. How does it chooses to receive ...
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1answer
574 views

Can a big microwave used to dry clothes?

I was wondering if it is possible for a microwave in principle to dry clothes (assuming of course it is big enough).
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3k views

Wavelength-dependent refractive index

I read in a book about optical fibers that the different spectral components of a light pulse transmitted in the fiber propagate with different velocities due to a wavelength dependent refractive ...
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1answer
141 views

Is there any literature that compares the candle-power to the candela?

I am unable to find anything in the literature to back up the claim that appears all over the internet that: ...
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1answer
11k views

If microwave ovens and WiFi both operate on the same frequency, why doesn't WiFi cook things?

If we ignore 5GHz WiFi, then both microwaves and WiFi create photons at ~2.4GHz but one of them will boil water in a few seconds but the other doesn't have any effect. So what's the difference? Is it ...
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1answer
155 views

Is it possible to create a hologram using X-Rays?

Is it possible to create a hologram using X-Rays (or other penetrating EM-waves)?
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1answer
2k views

reflection, refraction and diffraction occur in radio waves, which one occurs the most?

One of the things about Radio waves is that they undergo different behaviors such as reflection, refraction and diffraction when in contact with obstacles such as walls, buildings etc. what i want to ...
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397 views

What frequency photons are involved in mediating physical force?

If the force felt when pushing an object is mediated by the electromagnetic interaction and hence photons, what is their frequency?
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3answers
2k views

Complex numbers in optics

I have recently studied optics. But I feel having missed something important: how can amplitudes of light waves be complex numbers?
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2answers
632 views

Near-field around parabolic antenna?

Having a discussion at work about the $H$-field around a big parabolic antenna. All of the safety tests done around the antenna only mention $E$-Field. They state in the radiating near-field the $E$ ...
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1answer
4k views

Can microwaves affect WiFi?

I listen to the radio via my iPad with wifi. When I switch the microwave oven on, the radio cuts out. When the microwave oven is finished, the radio comes back on. (This is 100% reproducible!) So - ...
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1answer
1k views

Absorption / Control / Reduction of EMF radiation using passive antennae & matched load

Wanted to understand the physics behind usage of passive antennae and matched load combination, to absorb, control and reduce the Electromagnetic-Field (s.a. due to microwave radiation from cellular ...
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1answer
480 views

Speed of Light, Photons or WaveSpeed?

The speed of light is almost 300 000 km/s. The photons have a speed along the wave, and the wave have a speed straight forwards. What is the speed of light? Is it the speed the photons have along ...
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2answers
2k views

What's it like in a sphere mirror? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What happens to light in a perfect reflective sphere? I was working on my toy ray tracer when I pondered on this: Say we build a hollow sphere big enough to fit a person. ...
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4answers
435 views

Interaction of matter with EM fields

For the interaction between electromagnetic fields and matter, when do we have to include quantization of the EM field and when we can ignore it? when do we have to include quantization of atomic ...
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3answers
1k views

What does the differential of $d_s\sin(\theta) = m\lambda$ help us see, with respect to waves through diffraction gratings?

With respect to waves traveling through a diffraction grating, we have an equation like this one: $$d_s\sin(\theta) = m\lambda.$$ Where $d_s$ is the distance between slits in the grating, $\theta$ is ...
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2answers
935 views

Do gravitational waves slow down as they pass through matter?

I've heard that gravitational waves travel at the speed of light, and have some parallels to electromagnetic waves. EM waves slow down as they pass through matter (speed of light in glass is slower ...
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1answer
62 views

Is it possible to check from the EM waves(basically Light rays)?

Is it possible to check from the EM waves(basically Light rays), if there are any extraterrestrial objects interference/passage during its travel from the Sun? I mean, can these EMs from the Sun be ...
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2answers
241 views

Does light escape when I open my blinds?

When I open my blinds, there is light enough to read a book outside while the lamp is on inside. So when I close my blinds, does the light that otherwise will escape, stay inside and thus being ...
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2answers
268 views

Electromagnetic Radiation

If there was a way to see the electromagnetic waves that is all around us, i.e. see the electric and magnetic fields spreading away from an antenna say, how would it look? I mean if we were to freeze ...
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2answers
449 views

Big Bang and Cosmic microwave background radiation?

One of the experimental evidence that supports the theory of big bang is cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). From what I've read is that CMBR is the left over radiation from an early stage ...
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2answers
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What is the minimum wavelength of electromagnetic radiation?

As a first approximation, I don't see how a wavelength of less than 2 Planck distances could exist. The question is: Are there any other limits that would come into play before that? For example: ...
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6answers
9k views

How to Make RF Waves Visible

I understand RF (Radio Frequency) Waves are electromagnetic waves and a mode of communication for wireless technologies, such as cordless phones, radar, ham radio, GPS, and television broadcasts. Most ...
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1answer
536 views

What happens to speed and frequency of a light beam moving in transparent medium when observed from different inertial frame of reference?

Suppose a transparent medium where speed of light is $c/n$, an inertial frame of reference $K$ which is stationary relatively to the medium and an inertial frame of reference $K'$ which is moving ...
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1answer
256 views

Is the number of wavelengths of light spanning a distance invariant with respect to spacetime distortion?

I was recently asked by a friend how the expansion of spacetime affects photons. I gave him what I feel is a satisfactory general response, but it got me wondering how, exactly to calculate this ...
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2answers
336 views

Light and parabola

I know that parallel light beams hitting a parabola will be focused at the focus of the parabola (f = 1/4a) and a light source at the focus of the parabola will ...
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1answer
597 views

Why does the speed of light within a solid depend on frequency?

Different frequencies of light travel at different speeds through solids, which along with Snell's law allows for rainbows. Has this phenomenon of variable speeds been predicted through derivations? ...
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3answers
3k views

Why does light in a room not form constructive and destructive interference patterns?

This is something that I have wondered for a long time. How come when I walk around why do I not see random black spots where light has collided destructively and bright spots where it has collided ...
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2answers
14k views

How do Optically Active Compounds Rotate Plane Polarized Light?

I am not sure if this is more of a Chemistry or a Physics question, but in my Organic Chem class we discussed that chiral molecules will rotate plane polarized light. However, my professor did not ...
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2answers
318 views

Microwave absorption in tissue

Why do I have a big microwave absorption in tissue, when the tissue conductivity is high? I thougt the opposite would be correct. Can somebody explain the reason?
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1answer
373 views

Over what distances can one send/ receive from a GPS chip implant in a dog?

I am not into all the tech details of communication via RF with implant chips (tracking chips) and so would like to ask how the known atmospheric pertubations of shortwave radio affect the distances ...
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1answer
619 views

Formula for polarized “light” transmission through close filters?

I'm still trying to understand photons (or polarized electromagnetic radiation). This question is similar to one of my previous questions, but different: Consider the famous demonstration of crossed ...
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2answers
160 views

speed of an electromagnetic wave

I have this equation $$\dfrac{\partial E_z}{\partial y^2} - \mu_0 \varepsilon_0 \dfrac{\partial E_z}{\partial t^2} = 0$$ Why is $v^2 = 1 / (\mu_0 \varepsilon_0)$ ?
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4answers
633 views

Exactly how is the constant measured velocity of light deduced from Maxwell's equation?

For electromagnetic radiation the velocity of propagation is $c = 1/\sqrt{\mu_0 \epsilon_0}$. Since both $\mu_0$ and $\epsilon_0$ do not vary in any inertial frame, then $c$ must be constant in any ...
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1answer
2k views
4
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1answer
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Does the absence of a sound particle indicate that there are no photons?

Sound is usually referred to as just "sound waves" - we do not talk about a "sound particle" and only as a wave or "matter wave." Could something similar apply to light i.e. that there really is no "...
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1answer
169 views

How colored light can be explained if light is considered as emission of photon?

If light is considered as wave, then different colored light can be explained as waves of different wavelength/frequency. How colored light can be explained if light is considered as emission of ...
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1answer
196 views

Scattering off a random magnetic field?

Here is another old exam question I'm wondering about: A proton moving in the $-x$ direction encounters a region of space with a magnetic field that randomizes the direction of the particle. The ...
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5answers
1k views

Should I cook two pieces of Canadian Bacon twice as long as one in a microwave?

It will probably depend on the size of the pieces... but at what point should I stop assuming a linear relationship? I was prompted to ask in a previous question.
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7answers
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Why does light change direction when it travels through glass?

This was explained to me many years ago, by a physics teacher, with the following analogy: "If someone on the beach wants to reach someone else that is in the water, they will try to travel as much ...
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2answers
216 views

Multiple channels of information in single electromagnetic wave?

I'm trying to understand how can multiple radio stations transmit information just by transmitting using different frequency. The way I understand it all those different frequency waves add up to a ...
9
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2answers
625 views

Is it true that any system of accelerating charges will radiate?

I was recently told by a physics teacher that "any system of charges in which at least some of the charges are executing some sort of accelerated motion, will radiate and lose energy". This refers to ...