Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

1
vote
1answer
261 views

william herschel discovering infrared problem

when william herschel conducted the experiment of separating white light with a prism and measuring the different colors, he put a thermometer past the red color as a control finding it to pick up the ...
1
vote
5answers
3k views

The rule breaker, emissivity + reflectivity = 1

If emissivity and reflectivity are inversely proportionate, why does glass have a high emissivity of around 0.95-0.97 as well as being very reflective for IR Radiation? normally it works but not with ...
0
votes
3answers
605 views

Special Theory of relativity on electromagnetic waves

Since time slows down and length contracts, when we travel almost at speed of light, if the speed of light (or EM waves) remains same and the wavelength of light remains same, do we measure the ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

What is longitudinal relaxation time and transverse relaxation time? [closed]

How do we define the longitudinal relaxation time and transverse relaxation time?
8
votes
1answer
522 views

Do EM waves transmit spin polarization?

Suppose you have a normal dipole antennae (transmitter and receiver) . Spin polarized current (as opposed to normal current) is sent into the transmitter, it emits an EM wave and the Receiver receives ...
5
votes
2answers
513 views

How do you calculate power at the focal point of a mirror?

I'm a Mechanical Engineering student and I'm working on my senior project, so I need help. My project is about designing a solar dish having a diameter of 1.5 meters and a focal length of 60cm. so at ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

A charged sphere with pulsing radius

Radius increases and decreases periodically (as a pulse).And so does the charges on the surface of sphere. I can't get what is gonna happen.the EM waves are produced perpendicularly to motion of ...
6
votes
2answers
6k views

How photons represent colors that you see?

Right now, my understanding is that, a mixture of photons of many different frequencies is perceived as white by your eye. While no photons at all, is perceived as black. And photons with the blue ...
28
votes
8answers
3k views

What are the various physical mechanisms for energy transfer to the photon during blackbody emission?

By conservation of energy, the solid is left in a lower energy state following emission of a photon. Clearly absorption and emission balance at thermal equilibrium, however, thermodynamic equilibrium ...
2
votes
1answer
388 views

The length of an antenna is twice the amplitude of the wave

I have seen it remarked in some problem sets that if you have an electromagnetic wave traveling in the $x$-direction with it's $y$-coordinate given as $y(x,t)=y_0\sin (\omega t +kx)$ and you want a ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

Does shadow fading change if obstacles are fixed?

Given a RF sender and a receiver, suppose the obstacles between them are fixed, both their material and dielectric properties, does the path loss caused by their shadowing vary? If yes, what causes ...
4
votes
2answers
756 views

Mirror problem of radiation pressure

If two perfect mirrors are placed facing one another and they are in proximity, and photons (don't ask me how) are traveling between them and toward one of them, what is to keep the radiation pressure ...
0
votes
1answer
168 views

Possible to generate an electromagnetic field from moving an object through a magnetic field?

Is it possible to generate an electromagnetic field from a stationary rare earth magnet with a hole in it by passing an object through the hole? By definition, a Lorentz Force is the force on a ...
1
vote
1answer
606 views

Can I perceive the photoelectric effect as “ionizing with EM force”

The photoelectric effect demonstrates that EM radiation has particle-wave duality and it can be used to generate electricity. I am still a novice in physics and my understanding of this phenomenon is ...
1
vote
3answers
136 views

Trapping EM radiation [duplicate]

Is there a material which can allow light (or any other EM radiation) to pass through from one side as if it is transparent but its other side reflects light like a mirror?
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Monochromatic wave

If we have an EM wave like this one: $$E=\begin{pmatrix}1\\i\\0\end{pmatrix}e^{-i(\omega t-kz)}$$ The wave has clearly only one frequency $\omega$, but is it monochromatic? My doubt is that it's ...
4
votes
1answer
893 views

Two photons transition

if an atom in its ground state is coupled to an electromagnetic field it can absorb a photon if the EM field contains one with the right frequency. These transitions depends on $⟨f|H_i|i⟩$ (from Fermi'...
17
votes
7answers
6k views

Why does the speed of light $c$ have the value it does? [duplicate]

Why does light have the speed it does? why is it not considerably faster or slower than it is? I can't imagine science, being what it is, not pursuing a rational scientific explanation for the speed ...
7
votes
2answers
783 views

Does light really “travel”?

From what I've so far understood about light, a photon is emitted somewhere and after some time it's absorbed somewhere else. Have we had experiments that confirm the path taken or something akin to ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Should a 1D Guassian wave oscillate?

I wrote a few lines that numerically solve Maxwell's equations. The result is a moving wave that looks like a single pulse. This looks strange to me because I expect waves to move in oscillator ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Produciton of EM waves with differing wavelengths

Sun is the major source of electromagnetic radiation. Then if the source is the same, how are different EM waves with differing wavelengths produced?
0
votes
1answer
163 views

Red/Blue Shift in EM Waves

A Doppler weather radar operates at a frequency of 3.40 GHz. The wave from this radar system reflects from an approaching weather system moving with a speed of 39.0 m/s. What is the difference in ...
1
vote
2answers
472 views

Does the intensity of dipole radiation fall as $1/r^2$ or $1/r^3$?

I have seen this derivation: I want to estimate what is the intensity of the electrical field as function of $r$ the distance from the radiated source ? I think it is can modled as pointed source ...
6
votes
1answer
969 views

Explosively Pumped Flux Compression Generator = EMP strong enough to destroy my phone from a mile away?

Explosively Pumped Flux Compression Generator detonated a mile away or so, what damage would be done to my phone, and other electronics? I would imagine it would be similar to a CD in the microwave ...
15
votes
4answers
2k views

Can light waves cause beats?

My question is pretty brief. When two sound waves of nearly same frequencies interfere, we get beats. But, I have not observed something like that happening in the case of light. In fact, most of the ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

What was the first ionization radiation?

While trying to make somewhat of a timeline of the history of ionizatig radiation, i am wondering about the following questions: The first photoelectrical effect was found 1839 by Alexandre ...
0
votes
2answers
357 views

Absorbance by using Poynting vector

How should I compute the amount of energy of an EM wave absorbed by a material? Can I just use the divergence of the Poynting vector?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Do photons actually generate a slight kinetic force?

My question is even though photons have no (rest) mass, do they emit a external force due to EM radiation causing electrons to be excited and jump to higher energy shells which electrons have mass ...
2
votes
1answer
181 views

Holograms? Sci Fi or future fact?

Based on how light behaves when it passes through mediums, i.e. the wavelength of light changes when it passes through mediums of different refractive indexes, wouldn't it be possible to convert ...
4
votes
1answer
337 views

Classical blackbody radiation 'solution'

I never understood how the equipartition theorem was applied electromagnetic waves inside the metallic blackbody. As hyperphysics puts it (http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/%E2%80%8Chbase/mod7.html)...
7
votes
1answer
80 views

How strong must a signal be at the edge of the Solar System to penetrate into the Sytem?

A sort-of follow-up to Are the Voyager probes still sending us a signal ? Still following on the news report referenced in the above question, this report indicates further magnetic surprises at, or ...
0
votes
1answer
725 views

The nature of light

I'm not sure if this has been answered before, but I figured this would be the right forum to find out. I'm not by any means an expert in physics, just someone who's interested in understanding more ...
2
votes
2answers
185 views

Radiated power from a 'source volume' outside which charge & current are zero (i.e. derive radiated power from Jefimenko's equations)

In classical electrodynamics, what is the radiated power from a generalized source (consisting of charge density $\rho$ and current density $\vec{J}$) in vacuum? Let us define $V_s$ to be the ...
3
votes
1answer
245 views

Why does electromagnetic waves travel slower in well isolated conductor?

Wikipedia writes, that Propagation speed is affected by insulation, so that in an unshielded copper conductor ranges 95 to 97% that of the speed of light, while in a typical coaxial cable it is ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

If photons move linearly, what's actually stopping them from passing through a microwave oven mesh?

So, my understanding is that the wavelength of a photon is the distance traveled in the time it takes it's magnetic field to oscillate. And it's inversely proportional to it's energy and it's ...
2
votes
1answer
684 views

Eikonal approximation for wave optics. Why follow the unit vector parallel to the Pointing vector?

The description of the passage from wave optics to geometrical optics claims that light rays are the integral curves of a certain vector field (the Pointing vector direction, normalized to 1). Here ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

EM waves: How do they travel for billions of km without damping

If a star is 1 billion light years away, it means that the light we see from the star is emmitted billions of years ago. How does this light not undergo a frequency change or get damped inspite of ...
7
votes
1answer
11k views

What is light, and how can it travel in a vacuum forever in all directions at once without a medium?

I know there are many questions that are similar (maybe identical?). I am not a physicist nor a student - I am just interested in physics and have been watching many physics channels on youtube ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Young's Double Slit experiment question

Q-A beam of light consisting of two wavelenghts 600 nm and 450 nm is used to obtain interference in Young's Double Slit experiment (YDSE). Find the least distance from the central maximum where the ...
3
votes
1answer
410 views

Computer-Generated Holograms: I'm completely lost. How are they physically implemented?

I have been reading about holography, and I think I understand the general concept, but one thing that has me completely lost is how computer generated holography works in practice. I think I get the ...
1
vote
2answers
146 views

Can the speed of an electromagnetic wave be measured in the absence of neutrinos?

Let me explain better: from what I understand neutrinos are so pervasive they are literally everywhere. And since they have such a tiny electric charge they barely interact with anything and cannot be ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

How much better is salt water at letting through microwaves than pure water?

Radio Wave Attenuation There are two general types of matter (substances) in the universe that affect electromagnetic waves, conductors and insulators which are called dielectrics by ...
23
votes
5answers
2k views

Can a photon get emitted without a receiver?

It is generally agreed upon that electromagnetic waves from an emitter does not have to connect to a receiver, but how can we be sure this is a fact? The problem is that we can never observe non ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Measuring life through radiation

Dramatic title, I know. But it's shorter than Measuring a person's effective mass through radiation and comparing it to their weighed mass and I figured this would get people's attention. I just ...
1
vote
2answers
262 views

Do Nuclear Power Plants have shutdown and cooling systems protected from a nuclear generated EMP?

Forty years ago, I read a report concerning the difficulties of protecting my companies equipment, which was to be installed in Air Force One, from a Nuclear EMP. An EMP generated by a high altitude ...
1
vote
1answer
233 views

Circular Polarization

As one observes an clockwise (cw) circular polarized electromagnetic wave which is reflected off a denser medium or metal interface it is changed to a counter-clockwise (CCW) polarized em wave plus a ...
0
votes
1answer
404 views

Photons, no energy? [duplicate]

I am only 14, so I don't know much about physics, and I would appreciate help on this topic. A photon, is said to have 0 mass. However, they carry energy, as electromagnetic radiation. Albert ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

What exactly is the difference between a sychrotron light source and a free electron laser?

Cyclotron radiation is radiation emitted by a charged particle being bent by a magnetic field. The only difference between cyclotron and synchrotron radiation is that the latter occurs at relativistic ...
1
vote
2answers
242 views

Why wouldn't Hubble's Law be directly in units of frequency?

Maybe using this as an example: The energy of a particular color of yellow light is $3.44 \times 10^{-22}$ $kJ$ So if I want to find frequency of that light, I take that number, divide by $h$ ...
5
votes
0answers
308 views

Mirrors and light beam divergence technology limits

There are many applications for orbital space mirrors in astronomy (better telescopes) and space propulsion (solar power for deep space probes), but this is limited by the minimum beam divergence ...