Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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Make a semi transparent mirror with copper

The question: How would you make a semi transparent mirror (50% reflection, 50% transmission) with glass with a layer of copper. For light $\lambda$ = 500nm Try to be as realistic as possible What ...
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2answers
307 views

Understanding Dynamic light scattering

I'd like to understand the physics of dynamic light scattering experiment. In particular I want to understand the basic relation between relaxation time $\tau_q$ and the diffusion coefficient $D$: ...
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1answer
73 views

Weather Radar Interpretation - Radial Rays

I was browsing the NEXRAD radar feeds (I'm not an expert, just figuring them out) and I came across the following signature (visit the link to view the radar image) http://cl.ly/3n0y0p0g2M0K2B313g3U ...
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6answers
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Is all kind of light same speed?

Is there any speed difference between blue or red light? Is there ever a speed difference? Or does all types of light move at the same speed?
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1answer
1k views

A two-level system absorbs a detuned photon. Where does the extra energy go?

Let's consider simple two-level system with frequency gap of $\omega_0$ between ground and excited state. Now, when we turn on external electromagnetic field with frequency $\omega < \omega_0$, ...
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2answers
139 views

The Synchrotron at Caltech

In the Feynman Lectures Vol. 1, it says that the Synchrotron at the California Institute of Technology is capable of producing electromagnetic Radiations with a frequency of $10^{24}$ cycles per ...
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2answers
9k views

How does the grid on the microwave oven window prevent microwave radiation from coming out?

If I look through the microwave window I can see through, which means visible radiation can get out. We know also that there is a mesh on the microwave window which prevents microwave from coming out. ...
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1answer
4k views

Light interference maximum and minimum intensity points

This is a very basic question, but I just forgot how to solve this. It's classical physics question. Suppose that there are two light sources. And some place away exists a screen. How do I find ...
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2answers
146 views

Gamma Ray Bursts

What is the maximum frequency of the Gamma Rays produced during supernovae? And how are these detected by telescopes without getting some serious damage done?
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7answers
7k views

Cyclist's electrical tingling under power lines

It's been happening to me for years. I finally decided to ask users who are better with "practical physics" when I was told that my experience – that I am going to describe momentarily – prove that I ...
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1answer
298 views

Rayleigh diffraction by circular aperture

I am a beginner to physics and would need an explanation on a statement in a book "Karttunen, Fundamental astronomy". In a section named "Rayleigh diffraction by circular aperture", author states: ...
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1answer
885 views

Relationship between classical electromagnetic wave frequency and quantum wave function + de broglie frequency

As it is. As I study through classical mechanics and quantum mechanics, I began to wonder whether there is a relationship between classical electromagnetic wave frequency and quantum wave function ...
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5answers
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Phase shift of 180 degrees on reflection from optically denser medium

Can anyone please provide an intuitive explanation of why phase shift of 180 degrees occurs in the Electric Field of a EM wave,when reflected from an optically denser medium? I tried searching for it ...
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1answer
391 views

How is it possible that we see light from shortly after the big bang?

How can astronomers see light from shortly after the big bang? How did we get "here" before the light that emanated from our "creation"?
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5answers
3k views

Producing photons with same frequency, different amplitude wave [duplicate]

I don't understand how two photons of the same frequency can have different amplitudes, neither how to produce them. I know that classically the square of the amplitude is proportional to the energy, ...
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2answers
4k views

The energy of an electromagnetic wave

The intensity of an electromagnetic wave is only related to its amplitude $E^2$ and not its frequency. A photon has the same wavelength as the wave that's carrying it, and its energy is $h f$. So ...
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1answer
116 views

$\mu$T in to $\frac{W}{m^2}$ (for interpreting EMF readings)

I am considering purchasing an EMF reader, to collect data about what is being thrown off of power lines and various other sources in the house to reach some conclusions. An issue is, the meter can ...
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2answers
564 views

Why do you get electric field of a light wave?

Why do you get electric field of a light wave in following form: $E(x,t)=A cos(kx-\omega t- \theta)$?( look at: https://public.me.com/ricktrebino -> OpticsI-02-Waves-Fields.ppt, p. 18)
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1answer
563 views

Do ~1THz oscillators output “light”?

Upon looking at some radiation levels higher than Microwaves, I have come across "Terahertz radiation". According to the article, there are numerous ways to generate such radiation, and that brings ...
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0answers
317 views

Equations governing mutual inductance and transformers

What are equations for voltage ratio (primary/secondary) of... the action of a transformer with a turn ratio (turns primary/turns secondary) of X/Y and a toroidal core of cross-sectional radius R ...
2
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1answer
127 views

Can extraterrestials detect our messages?

We transmitted several messages to the space and listening to space for signs of intelligent life for years (SETI). Assuming they have at least the same technology we have, could they detect these ...
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5answers
1k views

Superposition of electromagnetic waves

The superposition of two waves is given by $$\sin(\omega_1 t)+\sin(\omega_2 t)=2\cos\left(\frac{\omega_1-\omega_2}{2}t\right)\sin\left(\frac{\omega_1+\omega_2}{2}t\right).$$ For sound waves, this ...
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2answers
170 views

Luminescence when ripping (answered) and when pouring (not answered)

As a father to a small child, I have often observed this phenomenon but have until i posted this question not found the vocabulary to Google for it. Can you explain what I am seeing? In a darkened ...
2
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2answers
7k views

How does Newton's 2-prism experiment help to explain why light does not get dispersed into 7-colors in a parallel glass slab?

In a real parallel glass slide(with two prisms imagined to be touching each other to form a parallel glass slide), The ray of light should pass through the Z in between without any dispersion or ...
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2answers
2k views

Why did the microwave oven only heat my coffe half as much as expected?

A sticker on my microwave oven states its output effect to be 750W, which is 180 calories per second. This means that heating 250g of water by one degree celsius would take 250/180 = 1.4s. Now, my ...
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4answers
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Can anyone explain to me why light is not dispersed into a spectrum through a parallel glass slide, but only through a prism?

The question pretty much sums up what I need to know. Why is it that light only gets dispersed into a spectrum when travelling through two non-parallel sides(like a prism) and not through something ...
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1answer
399 views

Why doesn't anomalous dispersion allow faster-than-light propagation?

It seems that the phase velocity of light could be greater than $c$, if $\sqrt{\epsilon \mu} < 1/c$, i.e. for anomalous dispersion. Are there examples of such media? For diamagnetics it seems ...
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3answers
3k views

How to calculate gamma radiation shielding?

A device emits 0.2 μSv/h of gamma rays. How thick does an aluminum sheet need to be to completely stop radiation from coming out ? What equation is to be used to calculate this ?
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3answers
6k views

In electromagnetic radiation, how do electrons actually “move”?

I've always pictured EM radiation as a wave, in common drawings of radiation you would see it as a wave beam and that had clouded my understanding recently. Illustration on the simplest level: ...
6
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2answers
805 views

Microwave oven + water: dielectric heating or ion drag?

When you place a water or food in a microwave oven, it heats. Which process commits more energy to that: dielectric heating, or ion drag i.e. resistive heating? AFAIK, in distilled water (which is a ...
8
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1answer
3k views

Why is light described by a null geodesic?

I'm trying to wrap my head around how geodesics describe trajectories at the moment. I get that for events to be causally connected, they must be connected by a timelike curve, so free objects must ...
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2answers
67 views

Does the efficiency of radiation change in any way in the presence of a medium?

I've read that radiation doesn't really require a medium. But if you're taking, for example, the sun's light, then does its efficiency of transmission increase or decrease once it reaches the earth's ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Are Colors Emitted at Specific Temperatures?

There are quite a few nagging questions I have been having over the years, I do not require a full explanation, just some guidance in my assumptions and pointers if I am very wrong. My basic ...
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2answers
208 views

References for Radio Imaging?

I'm really intrigued by a bunch of questions like 'what do radio waves look like?' 'how much RF radiation is there in the town I live in?' 'how specifically does RF imaging work?' But I think I need ...
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3answers
468 views

Where does the light of the Big Bang come from?

I'm wondering whether the residual light of the Big Bang comes from one particular direction and what possibilities do we have to detect its position?
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2answers
433 views

About change in velocity of a light wave as it enters a different medium [closed]

$\dfrac {sin\theta1}{sin\theta2}=\dfrac {v1}{v2}=\dfrac {n2}{n1}$ I understand this equation, but what is the velocity of a light wave going through air and what is the velocity/change in velocity as ...
11
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3answers
84k views

Why does wavelength change as light enters a different medium?

When light waves enter a medium of higher refractive index than the previous, why is it that: Its wavelength decreases? The frequency of it has to stay the same?
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4answers
6k views

Why does change in speed of a wave make it refract?

When a light wave enters a medium with a higher refractive index (e.g. from air to standard glass) and its speed decreases, why does that make it refract/bend? I understand that wavelength decreases ...
3
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2answers
151 views

How Safe Are Heat Ray Guns?

Could a little meddling with the frequencies of the Heat Ray Gun beam result in frying crowds rather than dispersing them?
3
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1answer
248 views

How to stop a heat ray gun

What material would be best suited to create a shield to protect from the new heat ray gun?
5
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4answers
4k views

Efficiencies of Coupling Light into a Fiber

I am in AMO Physics and work a lot with optics. I just wanted to get an idea of what coupling efficiencies one "should" get in a "reasonable time"* by coupling light into a fiber using different ...
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8answers
8k views

Why no longitudinal electromagnetic waves?

According to wikipedia and other sources, there are no longitudinal electromagnetic waves in free space. I'm wondering why not. Consider an oscillating charged particle as a source of EM waves. Say ...
2
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2answers
6k views

Microwaves vs Gas or Electric Coil heating of a water boiler in a typical household

Wouldn't it be more energy efficient and or safe to use microwaves to heat our home's water boiler instead of using dangerous gas or hot electric coils that could catch other things on fire? I'm kinda ...
3
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3answers
11k views

Penetration versus Frequency

I would like to know the relation between penetrating ability and the frequency of a wave. For example, gamma waves have high frequency and high penetrating power: intuitively I imagined this as ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Why does a microwave oven affect other electronic devices

When I turn my microwave oven over the stove on, it will cause a motion sensor light in the hallway next to the kitchen to got off and on. This affect can be reproduced anytime. I did notice that ...
2
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3answers
982 views

Is it correct to say that electromagnetic waves does not require a medium?

I can conceive of a particle existing in empty spacetime, but not a wave. A wave appears to me at least, to insist upon a medium for its very definition. I understand that the 19C physicists ...
24
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5answers
3k views

Does a charged particle accelerating in a gravitational field radiate?

A charged particle undergoing an acceleration radiates photons. Let's consider a charge in a freely falling frame of reference. In such a frame, the local gravitational field is necessarily zero, ...
5
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1answer
25 views

Is there any site/place which gives access to astronomical signals acquired from space?

I am an engineer and I'd like to know if there are any places which provide access to any kind of astronomical signals acquired from space using radio telescopes.
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2answers
444 views

Is the electron wave function defined during photon emission

I have heard the term quantum leap to describe the (instantaneous?) transition from a higher energy orbital to a lower energy orbital. Yet, I understand that this transition time has now been ...
2
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1answer
358 views

Experimental proof of gravitational redshift of light

Has the gravitational red shift been proven for electromagnetic waves only or also for a single photon?