Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

9
votes
3answers
1k views

Are Electromagnetic Waves The Only Means of Transmitting Information?

We've been using EMF to transmit energy (information) for over a century. I was wondering is there any other way to send a message on long distances, even faster than EMF waves can travel? For example ...
6
votes
1answer
461 views

How do individual photons make up an EM wave?

I'm trying to understand the connection between the wave model and the particle model for light. It's understood that the energy of a photon is given by E=hf, but from my understanding of fourier ...
0
votes
1answer
621 views

Accelerating electrons via microwaves

In Synchrotrons I think they use microwaves to accelerate the electrons bundles that fly through-how does putting a microwave through a cavity accelerate an electron? I know that the Electric and ...
2
votes
1answer
125 views

Cross-section of a wave packet

In text books, wave packets are one-dimensional drawings. But we live in a three-dimensional world. Suppose a wave packet from a HI-cloud (frequency 1420 MHz) is approaching the earth, distance about ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

How does an optic-mechanical laser read and send binary bytes to a CPU?

Thid greatly concerns physics, since a more refined version of my title will be rehearsed below: How is the physical structure of the mechanical eye use a laser to read binary bits held on an optical ...
1
vote
1answer
181 views

Accelerated charged particles produce electromagnetic radiation, but holes (the charge carriers) do not. Is this correct?

Holes are treated as particles in solid-state physics, so I've had some trouble with reasoning through this properly.
4
votes
1answer
208 views

Why is there an emission of gamma rays?

When a spontaneous radioactive reaction happens, there is an emission of gamma rays (in most cases) What causes this emission?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Are Electrons Electromagnetic Waves?

I encountered a thought provoking article suggesting that electrons are electromagnetic waves. Is this possible? I may not agree with their entire model, but surely there is the possibility that an ...
1
vote
1answer
280 views

Are multipole fields, multipole expansion, and multipole radiation the same thing?

Interaction between electromagnetic radiation and nuclei can be written in terms of multipole radiation. Are multipole fields, multipole expansion and multipole radiation the same thing? I have found ...
-3
votes
2answers
433 views

Conceptual doubts in EM waves and old quantum theory [closed]

I have a few questions. I know that EM waves transfer energy. So when they are generated why do they form curves? Are energy packets moving in a curvy path, or energy packets (quanta) not considered ...
2
votes
1answer
744 views

How much does sunlight affect inside temperature?

Suppose we have a $3\cdot 3\cdot 3\,m^3$ room of which one side is glass. And suppose that the other 5 sides have no effect on temperature (super isolation). We know from physics how to calculate ...
4
votes
1answer
205 views

Electromagnetic waves produced by a charged pith ball

Maxwell’s equations appear to have no limitation as to the length of an electromagnetic wave that can be produced by an accelerating electric charge. So in theory, if I use a charged rod to oscillate ...
6
votes
2answers
489 views

polarization of the lower mode gaussian beam

In most introductory analysis of Gaussian beam optics, Helmoltz scalar optics is assumed. Hence polarisation is ignored. But I'm not clear what are the possible orientations for the lower transverse ...
4
votes
2answers
408 views

Black body radiation

I have a few questions related to the emission of electromagnetic radiation by black bodies. Consider the following image: On the above image I have drawn the rays of light that are emmited by ...
6
votes
1answer
401 views

Photons: Collection of Wave Packets that produce a plane wave

Is it possible mathematically for photons, which behave as individual Gaussian wave packets, to combine in such a way that the approximate result is a plane wave at one particular frequency (i.e., the ...
6
votes
4answers
919 views

Origin of Rayleigh scattering

Is Rayleigh scattering simply the elementary result of scattering theory, that, at low energies (long wavelengths) the scattering is dominated by $s$-wave scattering?
1
vote
1answer
600 views

Simple Question: Speed of Electromagnetic Waves in a Medium

If the speed of an electromagnetic wave in a particular medium is such that $v = c$, the speed of light, does this mean that the permeability $\mu = \mu_0$, i.e. that of a vacuum and the index of ...
8
votes
1answer
3k views

How could we see microwave radiation with our eyes?

A few years ago I read a short little article about how big our eyes would have to be to observe microwaves (or any long-wave radiation for that matter). I don't remember enough about the article, or ...
1
vote
1answer
884 views

Does an accelerating proton also lose mass?

A proton accelerated with electric field gives off E.M. radiation and therefore should lose mass. Larmor's formula gives us a value for the power emitted (varies as acceleration squared). However, as ...
6
votes
1answer
122 views

Astronomical-wavelength radio (AWR) transmissions between cosmic plasmas?

My son asked me if electromagnetic waves longer than radio exist. I told him that even though physics permits such waves, there are no antennas long enough to radiate or detect them. However, on ...
3
votes
1answer
153 views

Interaction of an electromagnetic wave with a two level system in the domain of quantum field theory

Suppose I shine an electromagnetic wave on a two-level system. I need to describe how the system evolves in context of quantum field theory i.e. using a quantized EM field in the problem. The first ...
0
votes
3answers
206 views

Are waves on water an example of gauge invariance?

So: Is the close similarity of small waves crossing water of varying depths ("depth potentials") an example of an approximate gauge invariance? If so, do other "only the surface dynamics matter" ...
0
votes
1answer
155 views

How can we observe lights properties if it travels at the speed of light, or can we? [duplicate]

Special relativity says that anything moving (almost) at the speed of light will look like its internal clock has (almost) stopped from the perspective of a stationary observer. How do we see light as ...
1
vote
1answer
434 views

Super High Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation - String Theory

I am a serious high school student with one year of physics class experience, so please point out if there are any flaws in my question or reasoning. Thanks! Gamma ray radiation possesses a ...
30
votes
4answers
8k views

Why do prisms work (why is refraction frequency dependent)?

It is well known that a prism can "split light" by separating different frequencies of light: Many sources state that the reason this happens is that the index of refraction is different for ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is the photon emitted in the same direction as incoming radiation in Laser?

When an atom “lases” it always gives up its energy in the same direction and phase as the incoming light. Why does this happen? How can this be explained? How does the photon generated because of ...
0
votes
0answers
123 views

Historical aspect of wave theory of light

Huygens thought light as a wave. Wave is a propagation of physical disturbance. We now know that light is electromagnetic field. Electric and magnetic field fluctuates here. What Huygens really ...
17
votes
2answers
21k views

How and why does accelerating charges radiate electromagnetic radiation?

Lets consider it case by case: Case 1: Charge particle is at rest. It has electric field around it. No problem. That is its property. Case 2: Charge particle started moving (its accelerating). We ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

If light rays obey to the wave equation, why can they be thought as straight lines?

I'm a newbie with physics but I'm wondering how a ray of light can essentially be represented. I have always known that a ray of light proceeds in a straight line until it encounters another object ...
9
votes
4answers
5k views

Radio antennas that are much shorter than the wavelength

From my limited experience with ham radio when I was a kid, I expect transmitting and receiving antennas to have lengths that are on the same order of magnitude as the wavelength, and in fact I recall ...
37
votes
5answers
6k views

Why doesn't light kill me?

Why does each individual photon have such a low amount of energy? I am hit by photons all day and I find it amazing that I am not vaporized. Am I simply too physically big for the photons to harm me ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Does quantum mechanics depend solely on electromagnetic waves? [duplicate]

I am beginning to learn quantum mechanics. Since determining the position of an object involves probing by electromagnetic waves and since i have read a simple derivation of Heisenberg's uncertainty ...
0
votes
1answer
289 views

Effectivness of a metallic wall against microwaves propagation

I would like to know how good or bad behave a metallic wall in stopping the propagation of an microwave signal. To be practical, let's take the example of a GSM relay antenna. If I set up the ...
2
votes
4answers
9k views

How can we detect X-rays?

I know that X-rays can be detected by various ways, like ionizing of air particles. Is there a way to detect X-rays,which are photons, by detecting? Can something absorb the energy of the X-rays and ...
2
votes
2answers
133 views

Energy in Electromagnetic Waves

Looking at diagrams of Electromagnetic Waves, it would appear to me that at certain times the waves have zero amplitude, and consequently zero energy. Indeed, substituting in the sinusoidal terms into ...
2
votes
1answer
125 views

Trying to understand EM wave and photon

When electrical fields and magnetic fields couple together, it forms electromagnetic waves. And we can "quantized" it and see each "package" of it as photon. So can electrical fields and magnetic ...
5
votes
2answers
245 views

Is light's path a wave?

In a lot of textbooks I see a schematic of light drawn as a squiggly line. I have even heard that some things are too small to be seen because they are smaller than the wavelength of light (and ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

MRI's and Electromagnetic Radiation

If the waves in an MRI can go through our body, why is it that light with its magnetic fields gets stopped at our skin?
2
votes
0answers
381 views

Mathematical equivalence between Liénard-Wiechert potential and 4-potential in Rindler coordinates

I'm studying the problem of the radiation of an uniformly accelerated point charge: $$x^{\mu}(\lambda)\to(g^{-1}\sinh g\lambda,0,0,g^{-1}\cosh g\lambda)$$ I found that when a point charge is moving ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Is the de Broglie wavelength of a photon equal to the EM wavelength of the radiation?

Is the de Broglie (matter) wavelength $\lambda=\frac{h}{p}$ of a photon equal to the electromagnetic wavelength of the radiation? I guess yes, but how come that photons have both a matter wave and an ...
4
votes
4answers
982 views

Difference between electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and Electromagnetic Field?

I'm a freshly graduated electrical engineer. One course that I really struggled with was Field Theory, because it was a lovely assortment of vector calculus and things that were explained to me well ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

What happens to the energy not absorbed by a radio?

If a radio tunes to a specific frequency, where does the excess energy go? If one continues to hit the resonant frequency, shouldn't the wire begin to melt at some point from too much energy?
5
votes
1answer
271 views

Temperature of glowing materials

As I understand it, Stars emit visible light, OBAFGKMRNS, in the range of $10^3 - 10^4 K$. Yet materials such as steel emit similar frequencies at much lower temps; red is around 800K. Why the ...
2
votes
1answer
492 views

Uncertainty-principle and the Maxwell formalism of electromagnetic waves

An electromagnetic wave (like a propagating photon) is known to carry it's electric and magnetic field-vectors perpendicular and each depending on the differential change of the other thus "creating" ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Phasor representation of voltage in frequency domain

In a text on application of electromagnetism in transmission line, there introduces a phasor for the voltage (in frequency domain) $$\tilde{V}(x) = V^+e^{-i\beta x} + V^-e^{i\beta x.}$$ Here $V^+$ ...
2
votes
1answer
7k views

Where is the amplitude of electromagnetic waves in the equation of energy of e/m waves? [duplicate]

Does the amplitude of the photon oscillations always stay constant and if it is not - what are the physical differences between the photon with higher amplitude in comparison to the one with the less ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What properties make a good barrier for microwave (oven) radiation?

Suppose I have plenty of food I want to heat (which will provide load) in the microwave, and one item I don't want to heat. What properties would make a material a a good shield, to reduce or prevent ...
3
votes
2answers
276 views

What materials focus EM radiation in the 2.4GHz range

If glass and similar materials refract visible light effectively, what materials would be best for focusing lower frequencies of EM radiation, if any? If not, what other methods exist for focusing ...
1
vote
0answers
126 views

Longitudinal EMAG wave?

I'm reading about optical waveguide analysis, and often come across the terms "transverse electric mode" vs. "transverse magnetic mode". As I unerstand, it means that the electric/magnetic field has ...
0
votes
1answer
194 views

Fundamentals of electrostatics

Suppose I have a Gold Leaf Electroscope and the leaves are observed to diverge by a certain amount. Now if I send a beam of X-rays and allow it to fall upon the electroscope for a very short period of ...