Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
2answers
88 views

How to show with Maxwells Equations that nonaccelerating charges dont radiate? [closed]

How to show with Maxwells Equations that nonaccelerating charges don't radiate?
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Why are radio waves in the 1.43 - 2.5 Mhz range invisible?

Visible light diapason is 400 - 700 nm which is 1.43 - 2.5 Mhz. If using an antenna I would broadcast steady sinusoidal wave in this range, why the EM emitted by the antenna are not visible? Suppose ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

What really is reflection? [duplicate]

What really is reflection? Is it just the reemission of EMR? I asked my teacher, he said in quantum sense, it is true. But when I read something about emissivity in Stefan Boltzmann's equation, it ...
15
votes
3answers
262 views

Comparing predictions and reality for the gravitational attraction due to light beams

While doing some on-the-side reading, I stumbled across this question: Do two beams of light attract each other in general theory of relativity?. Great question and a great, easily understandable ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Waveguides Transmission Mode Determination

How do I know if I have TE, TM, or TEM rectangular conductive waveguide? For instance, I am doing a lab where we want maximum magnetic field in the waveguide, does that mean we want the TE because ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Electromagnetic spectrum

I understand that the electromagnetic spectrum is made up of different frequencies of light waves, but is this true in all cases such as with longer wave frequencies? "such as with microwaves". ...
4
votes
1answer
121 views

Soft Bremsstrahlung: why $\hat{k}\cdot\mathbf{v}= \mathbf{v}'\cdot\mathbf{v}$?

On page 181 in Peskin & Schroeder they say that we consider the integral (intensity) $$\tag{1}\mathcal{I}(\mathbf{v},\mathbf{v}') = ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Detailed balance formulation in solar cells?

Hello I wanted to know where does the integral of following picture come from and what are the alternatives in it? How and where can i find information i need to know to understand this text? thank ...
3
votes
2answers
81 views

Why aren't solar panels efficient?

Why can't solar panels produce 1 Kw per 1 square meter? This is the energy of the Sun's radiation per square meter on Earth but solar panels don't come close. Why can't we trap all that energy? ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Difference between Cotton Mouton effect and inverse Cotton Mouton effect

The Cotton mouton effect is observed when a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave passes through a dielectric medium and a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the direction of propagation of ...
7
votes
2answers
196 views

Do photons and cosmic rays radiate energy through gravitational waves? If not, why not?

Due to the mass-energy equivalence, both matter and EM radiation bend spacetime, and both are capable of forming singularities (black hole, white hole/kugelblitz). In light of this, why do photons ...
0
votes
3answers
278 views

Why does a human body only emit infra red radiation and not other types of electromagnetic radiation?

What causes humans to emit infra red radiation and why don't we also emit other types of electromagnetic radiation such as ultra violet or microwave? Sunlight contains UV and our body takes it in, but ...
5
votes
1answer
133 views

Orbital angular momentum of photon

People talk about orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons. Is there some physical example that cannot be explained without assuming that photons have non-zero OAM? Does different photons have ...
3
votes
1answer
90 views

Can atmospheric pressure literally push electromagnetic waves?

I work for an IT company and some time ago we had an issue with our wireless internet. We are 5 miles away from the ISP's antenna. Our Sys Admin expressed the view that the electromagnetic waves are ...
1
vote
2answers
53 views

Why don't X-rays/Gamma rays ionize all the atoms at the surface of a material?

Recently I've been wondering why certain materials are transparent or opaque to different wavelengths of light. The most common explanation for why a material, like glass, is transparent (in the ...
2
votes
1answer
129 views

Faraday rotation effect in circularly polarized waves?

We all know farady effect is observed in linearly polarized wave when it passes through a dielectric medium and magnetic field is along the direction of propagation. Is this phenomenon observable in ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Characteristic quantities in Fiber optics

I'm having trouble finding typical quantities in fiber optic communication. In particular, what kind of powers are generally used (or what is the minimum that fiber optics receivers can detect ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Admixtures of longitudinal and timelike photons!

In the quantization of electromagnetic field the physical states $|\psi\rangle$ are found to obey the following relation: $[a^{(0)}(k)-a^{(3)}(k)]|\psi\rangle=0$ It is explained as the physical ...
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

Why polarization vector $= (0,1,i,0)$?

I know from CED that one has e.g. polarization $$\vec{E}(z,t) = \begin{bmatrix} e_{x} \\ e_{y} \\ 0 \end{bmatrix} \; e^{i(kz - 2 \pi f t)}. $$ Why do Peskin&Schroeder define a polarization ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

How does a MRI use 20.1kW yet creates over 204K BTU/h? [closed]

I've been reading through a manual about MRI operating procedures for a large healthcare provider. The manual (written by Siemens) states that the MRI machines use 9kW in stand-by mode and 20.1kW ...
4
votes
1answer
68 views

Does the cavity magnetron in a microwave oven produce x-rays?

It seems like it should due to bremsstrahlung, since we're talking about electrons with 5-7KeV of energy slamming into the walls of the device, but I've found no information about this online, so I'm ...
2
votes
2answers
124 views

Temperature behavior over time of black or white cars in hot, sunny regions

How does the color of a car influence its inner temperature change over time when parked outside in windless, hot and sunny regions? I know what's the common idea about that: black cars are supposed ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Dynamic light scattering of rods at low q

In dynamic light scattering (DLS), I understand that for spherical particles it is their diffusive motions which cause the intensity fluctuations that are correlated. And that the scattering vector ...
2
votes
1answer
211 views

Physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and origin of EM waves

Is it possible to describe the physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and show how they lead to electromagnetic wave, with little involvement of mathematics ?
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Import of Celestial Effects on Satellite Radio Interference

Some internet (among other) infrastructure comprises satellites, which beam communications in radio frequencies. These satellites, to ground observers, appear as very small solid angles in the sky. ...
-2
votes
1answer
72 views

Can an EM wave be represented in terms of dipole?

The direction of propagation is represented by a line. A positive charge moves along this line at velocity c. A negative charge moves along a line that is perpendicular to the direction of propagation ...
0
votes
4answers
108 views

Why does special relativity talk about the speed of light in a vacuum?

What's the importance of the speed of light being in a vacuum? Does not being in a vacuum cause a difference?
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Why does black get heated the most? [duplicate]

I found out black heats up the most and white the least, as I expected. The question I had is that despite black reflecting all the wavelengths of the visible spectrum, and hence giving the black ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Geiger meter affected by plasma lamp

Whilst testing a geiger meter I took it near a plasma globe (the type sold in party/toy stores). The meter showed 0.13 mcSv/h. Then I turned the lamp on and low and behold the meter jumped to 0.89 ...
-1
votes
1answer
84 views

Why can TV broadcasts send such large amounts of data(photorealism) and a PC cant

Firstly I think I am right in saying that TV broadcast are sent via electromagnetic waves which means they are sent via photons, how is that even possible? And then the main questions, how can you ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Spatial light modulation for mode multiplexing, how does it work?

If a laser light becomes spatial phase modulated (by phase only spatial light modulator) what happens to the intensity distribution and frequency spectrum of the laser light ? I know that this ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

What is the energy distribution of light if it has an infinite length?

What is the energy distribution of light if it has an infinite length? I have read in one of the answers here on phys.SE that light has actually an infinite length. But then what is the energy ...
9
votes
3answers
519 views

Do particle accelerators produce (dangerous) radiation?

I was under the impression that particle accelerators were pretty harmless, but some article said that they produce harmful radiation when you're in the tunnel. Given that the Internet... isn't always ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Do acousto-optic modulators shift the frequency of the diffracted beams?

Today I read an introduction on an optical device called an acousto-optic modulator, which is used in many optical experiments. It is the first time I have heard of this element. The material showed ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Why electric field has a major role in vision?

Although the electromagnetic wave is made op of both electric and magnetic fields the electric field contributes much in vision and is thus, called the light vector. But, why is it that the electric ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

What would give us more heat ? infrared or microwaves?

As we know that our body is made up mostly of water and the frequency of vibration of water molecules matches that of microwaves which is the working principle of microwave ovens. When we come in ...
2
votes
2answers
313 views

Why does noise affect FM radio less than AM?

Frequency modulated waves are less susceptible to noise compared to amplitude modulated signal. This is because the information in an FM signal is transmitted through varying the frequency, and not ...
1
vote
2answers
146 views

Why do waves diffract?

There have already been a lot of questions on this site on diffraction but I still believe this one might be slightly different. In electromagnetic waves, diffraction and any other phenomenon of wave ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

Do I understand measurement of dispersion relation in a solid correctly?

I'm currently doing an introduction to solid state physics course and have a quick question about measurement of the dispersion relation of phonons in a solid: The way I understood it is the ...
0
votes
2answers
116 views

Does a HDD ( Hard Disk Drive) emit radio waves?

While I was reading the "guide" of a HDD I had bought a while ago, I found that it might emit radio waves. I was wondering if that is true and why that happens?
4
votes
2answers
301 views

Why do electromagnetic waves oscillate?

I've been considering this question, and found many people asking the same (or something similar) online, but none of the answers seemed to address the core point or at least I wasn't able to make ...
1
vote
2answers
60 views

Electromagnetic radiation lenses

This will probably be a very basic question, but looking for a simple answers. What I know the visible light is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a defined wavelength. the full spectrum ...
-2
votes
2answers
196 views

Is it physically possible to convert matter into the electromagnetic spectrum (specifically x-rays)? [closed]

I was considering the problem with teleporting organic matter, and was curious to know if I can use this to avoid killing anything I teleport?
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Diffraction from interatomic spacing

In diffraction from a single slit, we learn that the angular width of the central maxima, is given by $2\sin^{-1}\frac \lambda d$. For $d\approx \lambda$, the incoming wavefront should be spread to ...
2
votes
2answers
149 views

Does AC current produce EM waves?

Does AC current in simple wires produce electromagnetic waves? AC current entails very rapid changes in polarity and therefore the electrons in the metal will feel rapidly changing forces which should ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Edison effect for incandescent bulb?

I would like to ask a question on incandescent light. From the Thermionic emission (Edison effect), heated tungsten filament emits electrons that could be collected by an anode (like a foil ...
1
vote
2answers
164 views

Do electromagnetic waves always move in straight lines?

When we send an electromagnetic short wave to the sky, it reflects due to the ionosphere effects. But if we send it horizontally, is it correct that it moves around the surface of the earth, and if it ...
0
votes
0answers
106 views

How much energy does the most powerful supernova release in any form other than neutrinos?

I have read most of the supernova article on wikipedia, and there are a lot of numbers and different types of supernovae so I am confused. What I need to know is how much energy is released from some ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Polarisation of light is a wave concept or applicable to photons as well?

I have a very fundamental question. We explain polarisation of light assuming wave nature of light. Is it still valid if we assume light as photons? Or in other words, polarisation is a wave concept ...
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Problem with relativity of acceleration

In this answer http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/92833/36977 John said that acceleration is not relative in the general theory of relativity. But this is a problem: as we all know, accelerating ...