Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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When align the neutron's magnetic dipole moment, does moving neutron radiates?

Was performed an experiment in the past, where neutrons pass a magnetic field and their magnetic dipole moment get aligned? Was measured an electromagnetic radiation during the experiment?
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Does staring at a bright LED light damage your eyes?

According to this article it seems that it is the UV part of the spectrum from the Sun that causes damage to the eye. Would it therefore be "safe" to observe directly an equivalent energy density LED ...
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Mirror problem of radiation pressure

If two perfect mirrors are placed facing one another and they are in proximity, and photons (don't ask me how) are traveling between them and toward one of them, what is to keep the radiation pressure ...
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57 views

Explanation of Interference of Electromagnetic Waves

There is a question on a test which goes like this: "Given two electromagnetic waves, one of wavelength 6.0 X 10-7 m and the other of wavelength 7.0 X 10-7 m, travelling in space. When the two ...
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42 views

Photograph of Light as Wave and Particle [duplicate]

what is this? actually its the first photo of light as wave and a particle. The bottom "slice" of the image shows the particles, while the top image shows light as a wave. i have questions 1.how ...
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81 views

Do EM waves need a medium to propagate? [duplicate]

The official theorie says that they don't need a medium, it states that: EM waves are a disturbance in the field First of all, what field?? An electromagnetic one ? I mean, I consider that field as ...
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14 views

Looking for full equation for radar cross section of corner reflector

There's a well-known formula for the RCS of a corner reflector (aka corner cube), to wit $ \sigma \varpropto \frac{L^4}{\lambda^2} $ . I've found several sources which cheerfully say "...valid for $ ...
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8k views

Penetration versus Frequency

I would like to know the relation between penetrating ability and the frequency of a wave. For example, gamma waves have high frequency and high penetrating power: intuitively I imagined this as ...
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19 views

How do you calculate the magnitude of the light waves emitted from an LED?

Question is in the title. My goal is to see if this is enough to make an interferometer using a surface-mount photodetector.
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Why do lightbulbs continue to glow after the light is turned off?

I've noticed that whenever I turn the lamp off in my room at night, the lightbulb seems to continue to glow for a minute or so after that. It's not bright though; the only way I even notice it is if ...
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255 views

How is extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation collected by a submarine antenna?

The U.S. Navy Project ELF managed to generate extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation at down to $\approx 76$ Hz (implying a wavelength of $\approx 3,945$ km!). I was curious, what kind of receiving ...
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65 views

Do rainbow shows spectral lines?

A spectral line is the electromagnetic radiation emitted when the electron jumps from higher orbital to a lower orbital of an atom. Water mainly consists of two elements namely hydrogen and oxygen, ...
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21 views

Are the EM waves that result from each of these processes distinguishable? Phase of light upon emission

In case 1, you have a single source of light that you pass through a diagonally oriented linear polarizer and then a half waveplate, such that the horizontal and vertical components become $\pi$ out ...
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Can microwaves affect WiFi?

I listen to the radio via my iPad with wifi. When I switch the microwave oven on, the radio cuts out. When the microwave oven is finished, the radio comes back on. (This is 100% reproducible!) So - ...
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17 views

My microwave oven disrupts my bluetooth connection even when I'm 12ft away. Should I be worried? [duplicate]

I often wear bluetooth headphones that connect to my mobile phone. I work on my laptop in my dining room approx. 12ft away from the microwave oven and my mobile phone is usually in my pocket; ...
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1answer
32 views

ionising atom(s) with gamma rays

if a gamma ray hits an electron and transfers energy, does it hit that electron (ionising the atom), transfer all its energy and stop or does it pass through multiple electrons, transferring a portion ...
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396 views

What is the relationship between Faraday cage mesh size and attenuation of cell phone reception signals?

This is related to the question how can electromagnetic waves reach a cell phone in faraday cage?, where in the answer it was stated that the holes (=size of the mesh) would need to be smaller than ...
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1answer
32 views

Plane Mirror as the Screen in Young's experient

If I place a plane mirror instead of the screen in the Young's double slit experiment, what will I see? Will the bands appear on the mirror face?
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49 views

How to create a vaccum tube & produce electron beam

I know that when an anode & cathode are placed inside a vaccum tube, electrons are emmited from cathode and goes towards anode. So, How to produce such a high voltage?, How to create such a ...
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72 views

Propagating higher order Hermite Gaussian modes. What are complex amplitude coefficients?

I've been tasked with writing a code (in MatLab, but I'm currently using Mathematica because I don't know MatLab %\ ...) to simulate the propagation of a Gaussian beam. I don't really know anything ...
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51 views

If EM waves are made of oscillating electric and magnetic fields, how come photons have no charge?

I just recently learned that electromagnetic waves are made of oscillating electric and magnetic fields, and I have a question. In the standard model, photons are described as having zero charge, and ...
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4answers
8k views

Why does a human body only emit infra red radiation and not other types of electromagnetic radiation?

What causes humans to emit infra red radiation and why don't we also emit other types of electromagnetic radiation such as ultra violet or microwave? Sunlight contains UV and our body takes it in, but ...
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1answer
31 views

Is this a standing or moving wave?

The electric field of a uniform plane wave traveling in a source free region of free space is given by: $ \vec E= (0.5j \vec x + \vec y)(e^{j \beta z} - e^{-j \beta z})$. Is this a traveling wave or ...
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74 views

Is it possible to produce coherent light with a thermal source? [closed]

Coherent light means monochromatic light and alle waves have the same phase difference. This is given for laser, where the resonator is a potential box and the outgoing waves have the same phase ...
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2answers
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Do x-rays and gamma rays also contain photons like visible light does?

Do x-rays and gamma rays also contain photons like visible light does? If so, then what makes photons of visible light and other waves different? The rest mass of a photon is zero, but as it moves at ...
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35 views

Why does a good conductor shows pronounced skin effect?

I am currently studying transmission of em waves and skin effect is puzzling me. Let us consider an em wave propogating in z-direction with electric field in x-direction & magnetic field in ...
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What does it mean to perturb the electromagnetic energy with respect to a change in a Lorentz frame?

I am perturbing the energy of an electromagnetic field using \begin{align} \dfrac{\partial U}{\partial \zeta} = \dfrac{1}{\mu} \boldsymbol{H}\cdot \dfrac{\partial \boldsymbol{H}}{\partial \zeta} + ...
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606 views

Difference between electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and Electromagnetic Field?

I'm a freshly graduated electrical engineer. One course that I really struggled with was Field Theory, because it was a lovely assortment of vector calculus and things that were explained to me well ...
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3answers
4k views

How much electric charge do electromagnetic waves carry?

Since electromagnetic waves have both electric and magnetic field components, which oscillate in phase perpendicular to each other and perpendicular to the direction of energy propagation. How much is ...
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18 views

Inhomogeneous scattering from a dielectric box in 2D?

I wrote an E&M simulator and need to verify the accuracy. My simulator evaluates a 2D grid (which is what my camera measures), and would like to test an object that is minimally perturbed by ...
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1answer
66 views

Can Maxwell's Equations explain electromagnetic radiation emission in an atom?

Can Maxwell's equations be used to explain the process of spontaneous emission when an electron drops from a higher energy level to a lower energy level? According the Maxwell equations, a changing ...
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1answer
53 views

What is space charge and how to calculate it?

I want to clarify the meaning of space charge. What I know is that the space charge is the total charge in a small region in space. I really confuse this in the ion beam context. Many text book says ...
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2answers
108 views

Is it feasible to transfer energy from power stations to communities via photons instead of electrons?

Electrical wires are relatively inefficient in transferring energy--especially when the place of production is quite far from communities. Would it be possible to transfer that energy via photons? I ...
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78 views

Against what force are we doing work when we accelerate an electron?

In vol. I, chapter 32, of The Feynman Lectures, Feynman says: If we take a charged body and accelerate it up and down it radiates energy; if it were not charged it would not radiate energy. It ...
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86 views

Is it true that the self-force prevents a classical particle from falling into a Coulomb potential? What is the physical explanation of this result? [closed]

In 1943 CJ Eliezer published a paper claiming that the self-force prevents a zero angular momentum particle from ever reaching the center of an attractive Coulomb potential (and what's more that it ...
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5answers
2k views

Do the electric and magnetic components of an electromagnetic wave really generate each other?

Frequently when EM waves are taught, it is said that the change in electric field causes a change in the magnetic field, which then causes a change in the electric field, and so on and so forth. But ...
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2answers
83 views

Is light a particle with EMF or does it travel in wave? [duplicate]

Is light a particle which has a electromagnetic field around it OR does the particle itself travels in a wave like motion? IS it just the EM field which moves in a wavy motion like ripples? (Please ...
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1answer
41 views

How would one build an RF cavity?

How does an RF cavity, such as the RF cavities in the LHC, work mechanically and mathematically? How would one build an RF cavity? What equations govern the speed of a charged particle in an RF ...
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143 views

Why does the second Weyl scalar describe electromagnetic radiation?

I've been reading about the null tetrad, the Weyl tensor, and the Newman-Penrose identities, and so I found out about the Weyl scalars. While the zeroth, first, third, and fourth scalars describe ...
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2answers
86 views

How does electromagnetic radiation affect the velocity of a charged particle?

I've heard that the acceleration of a charged particle releases electromagnetic waves. So let's say there is a charged electron moving forwards in a region with a downwards magnetic field. If the ...
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1answer
56 views

Has someone measured that in the far field of radio waves, the electric and magnetic field oscillate synchronously?

That in near field both fields oscillating 90° displaced is obvious since in antenna rod a lot of electrons will be accelerated and and this oscillation of electric field is escorted by alignment of ...
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How can light carry data if light has no mass, and data has mass? [closed]

Via a packet-switched network, like the internet, data is sent as packets (bits) wirelessly via radio waves with Wi-Fi, or 802.11g, etc. What my question is is this: Radio waves are light; light has ...
2
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1answer
28 views

Polarization of light for a fast moving observer

For a fast moving observer the frequency of light becomes shifted due to the (relativistic) Doppler effect. But what about the polarization of the light? Could it be, that e.g. circular polarized ...
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2answers
25 views

For a light of given frequency, what does the amount of refraction in a variable medium depends upon?

I want to know whether the amount of refraction of a given monochromatic light depends solely upon the density of the of the medium ( increase the density to increase the angle of refraction), or ...
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4answers
2k views

The rule breaker, emissivity + reflectivity = 1

If emissivity and reflectivity are inversely proportionate, why does glass have a high emissivity of around 0.95-0.97 as well as being very reflective for IR Radiation? normally it works but not with ...
7
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3answers
340 views

Is it possible to split a single light beam into two beams of opposite circular polarization?

A properly oriented calcite crystal will separate an unpolarized beam into two beams, one vertically polarized and one horizontally polarized. Other polarizers pass just one polarization and absorb ...
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3answers
902 views

Can polarized light be unpolarized again?

I was just wondering if there could be a process that could unpolarize polarazied light. Is that possible?
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Is my window's semi-transparency a consequence of elementary quantum mechanics? [duplicate]

Studying mathematical concepts of quantum mechanics, I have recently become familiar with the classical model of one-dimensional particle being scattered by a potential barrier. As a mathematician, I ...
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1answer
43 views

Amplitude of eliptically polarised light

In elliptically polarized light, can one define something called amplitude of Electric field? If yes, how do we determine it?