1
vote
2answers
26 views

How the polarization of electromagnetic wave is determined?

What help us determine the polarization of electromagnetic wave . Does perpendicular electric and magnetic field determine it or does the direction of propagation ?
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Angular momentum of light

Can someone explain the classical angular momentum in electromagnetic theory of light? If I shine elliptically polarised em wave on a black disc it rotates. I would like to know how to calculate ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Electromagnetic waves in an antenna

There is a few questions that need to be answered in detail but in an easy way... What does it mean to describe the 'plane of polarisation' of electromagnetic waves? Why will some antenna have rods ...
0
votes
1answer
203 views

Intensity of unpolarized light through polarizer

When unpolarized light is polarized with two polarizers, the intensity becomes $I=I_ocos^2(θ)$ (Malus's law). But when unpolarized light is polarized with only one polarizer, the intensity is reduced ...
5
votes
4answers
206 views

Question about the wave nature of light

I quote from my textbook, " Consider two vertical slits S1 and S2 placed parallel to each other, and a string is passed through them. The end B is fixed and A is given jerks perpendicular to its ...
5
votes
2answers
172 views

Is my simulation result for unpolarized light correct?

This is a follow-up of this question. After that, I picked up some knowledge of FDTD (an algorithm for solving Maxwell's equations) and simulated following scene: Pic 1 As the picture shows, a ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Why in 2+1 spacetime dimensions electromagnetic wave (light) cannot be distinguished with acoustic wave (mechanical wave)?

I have heard a saying that in 2+1 spacetime dimensions electromagnetic wave cannot be distinguished with acoustic wave. Or maybe they want to say in 2+1 spacetime dimensions photon and phonon cannot ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

Difference between Cotton Mouton effect and inverse Cotton Mouton effect

The Cotton mouton effect is observed when a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave passes through a dielectric medium and a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the direction of propagation of ...
2
votes
1answer
368 views

Faraday rotation effect in circularly polarized waves?

We all know farady effect is observed in linearly polarized wave when it passes through a dielectric medium and magnetic field is along the direction of propagation. Is this phenomenon observable in ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

Admixtures of longitudinal and timelike photons!

In the quantization of electromagnetic field the physical states $|\psi\rangle$ are found to obey the following relation: $[a^{(0)}(k)-a^{(3)}(k)]|\psi\rangle=0$ It is explained as the physical ...
-1
votes
1answer
92 views

Why polarization vector $= (0,1,i,0)$?

I know from CED that one has e.g. polarization $$\vec{E}(z,t) = \begin{bmatrix} e_{x} \\ e_{y} \\ 0 \end{bmatrix} \; e^{i(kz - 2 \pi f t)}. $$ Why do Peskin&Schroeder define a polarization ...
-2
votes
1answer
87 views

Can an EM wave be represented in terms of dipole?

The direction of propagation is represented by a line. A positive charge moves along this line at velocity c. A negative charge moves along a line that is perpendicular to the direction of propagation ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

Polarisation of light is a wave concept or applicable to photons as well?

I have a very fundamental question. We explain polarisation of light assuming wave nature of light. Is it still valid if we assume light as photons? Or in other words, polarisation is a wave concept ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

How is the orientation of an electromagnetic wave determined?

I was looking up for how polarisers work, I understood mostly everything except the part that explains that the polariser filters everything except light that is in a certain orientation. Here are my ...
5
votes
2answers
228 views

Impossible microwave interference?

I was doing a microwave experiment with the following set up: there is a Gunn diode which emmits microwave radiation and a receiver (both work with polarised light). The strange thing is that when ...
2
votes
1answer
467 views

Why depolarization of light by scattering

I am trying to understand the concept of depolarization of light by various particle shapes. For example, depolarization light scattered (re radiated) from a sphere illuminated with vertically ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

If photons carry 1 spin unit, why does visible light seem to have no angular momentum?

Spin 1 silver atoms have a definite spin axis, e.g. up or down along an axis labeled X. This in turn means that they carry angular momentum in an overt, visible fashion. However, spin 1 photons do ...
4
votes
1answer
317 views

Monochromatic wave

If we have an EM wave like this one: $$E=\begin{pmatrix}1\\i\\0\end{pmatrix}e^{-i(\omega t-kz)}$$ The wave has clearly only one frequency $\omega$, but is it monochromatic? My doubt is that it's ...
1
vote
1answer
151 views

Circular Polarization

As one observes an clockwise (cw) circular polarized electromagnetic wave which is reflected off a denser medium or metal interface it is changed to a counter-clockwise (CCW) polarized em wave plus a ...
9
votes
5answers
2k views

Why Does Light Not Become Polarized In A Magnetic and/or Electric Field?

I am familiar with the Faraday Effect, but I remain confused as to why the electric and/or magnetic components of light do not naturally align themselves with a magnetic or electric field (in a ...
5
votes
2answers
517 views

Jones vector and matrices

With Jones vectors and matrices one can describe the change in polarization of a EM wave. What is the convention of the reference coordinate system; Is it fixed or does it change whenever the ...
4
votes
2answers
556 views

Why does the electric field dominate in light?

I read a book on the wave property of light where the author mentioned that the electric field, instead of magnetic field, dominates the light property. I don't understand why. In Maxwell's theory, a ...
5
votes
2answers
273 views

Is it possible to split a single light beam into two beams of opposite circular polarization?

A properly oriented calcite crystal will separate an unpolarized beam into two beams, one vertically polarized and one horizontally polarized. Other polarizers pass just one polarization and absorb ...
3
votes
2answers
208 views

Liquid crystal polarizes light reflection question

I was hoping someone could help me with understanding why a row of polarizes reflects a light wave when the whole row is the same length as the wavelength of the light. I pretty much get the ...
3
votes
1answer
408 views

Electromagnetic field of unpolarized light

I need help in finding an expression for the instantaneous electric and magnetic field of unpolarized light in order to write down and evaluate the time-averaged norm of the Poynting vector (i.e. the ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Does infrared rays pass through polarized glass?

Actually I had asked in another post that "Does infrared rays pass through active shutter glass" but someone just commented that infrared rays dont pass through polarized glass. If infrared rays ...
4
votes
1answer
489 views

Polarization rotation: Jones Matrix that maps Horizontal to right circular

I am looking at the Poincaré sphere and I am trying to compute a Jones matrix for a particular rotation. Specifically, I would like it to perform the following maps: $O :|H \rangle \rightarrow |R ...
15
votes
2answers
8k views

How do Optically Active Compounds Rotate Plane Polarized Light?

I am not sure if this is more of a Chemistry or a Physics question, but in my Organic Chem class we discussed that chiral molecules will rotate plane polarized light. However, my professor did not ...
1
vote
1answer
247 views

Linear polarizer and the angle of incidence

It is known that when a beam of lineary polarized light falls perpendicularly on a linear polarizer, the intensity of polarization changes according to Malus' law and the direction of polarization ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Polarization and mirrors

When a light beam reaches a dielectric surface, the incident and reflected beams have different intensities depending on polarization. For the so-called Brewster's angle, the reflected light is ...
6
votes
1answer
395 views

Where does the energy go, when light is blocked by polarisation

I've been looking around about LCD monitors, and how they polarise light. When a pixel needs to be black, the light is "twisted" so that it can't go through the polarising sheet in front. What happens ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the effect of polarization on diffraction by a narrow slit?

Consider the well known demonstration of diffraction by a narrowing slit. (See for example the demonstration at the 30 minute mark of this lecture at MIT by Walter Lewin) It is my (possibly mistaken) ...
8
votes
5answers
5k views

Interference of polarized light

Does polarized light interfere?
10
votes
6answers
1k views

What causes polarised materials to change colour under stress?

Our physics teacher showed the class a really interesting demonstration. He used two polarised filters in opposite orientations, then he took some antistatic tape and stretched it under the two ...