Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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7 views

Plasmon quenching vs plasmon decay. What is the difference?

I'm reading an article "Quenching, Plasmonic, and Radiative Decays in Nanogap Emitting Devices" (pubs.acs.org/journal/apchd5). I don't understand the following: Counterintuitively, we evidence ...
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0answers
11 views

When light reflects from a medium of lower index of reflection to a medium of higher index of refraction, why does the light undergo a phase shift? [duplicate]

I learned in my physics class that there is a phase shift when light reflects off a low $n$ from a higher $n$, but never got the explanation.
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1answer
21 views

Can you have a problem with a Dirichlet boundary condition but with waves that reflect off the boundary?

Say we are looking for a solution to the Helmholtz equation $$(\Delta + k^2) u = 0,$$ in in the upper half space ($y > 0$) in 2D with a Dirichlet boundary condition on the $x$-axis, that is, $u(x, ...
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0answers
21 views

Faraday Cage for radiations from Uranium

Is it possible to build Faraday Cage like structure for Gamma Radiations or Beta radiations, so that a person inside that cage or sphere so that inside person remain protected from nuclear explosion. ...
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0answers
8 views

Change in Q factor on tuning external magnetic field in Electron spin resonance experiment

Does the Q factor of the cavity resonator show a dip at the resonant value of the external magnetic field while performing an ESR experiment?If so, what is the physical reason behind it?
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1answer
89 views

How to solve “EM wave equation” for the field of uniformly moving charge?

Is it possible to show that the field of a uniformly moving charge, which is according to Biot-Savart law is given by... $${\bf E}({\bf r},t)=kq\left(\frac{1-v^2/c^2}{(1-v^2 \sin^2 ...
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1answer
25 views

How are the frequency and wavelength of electromagnetic waves affected within an event horizon?

I apologize if this has been asked previously or if my thinking is way off base, but I am inexperienced with relativity (and this is my first question on the site). I am wondering; as one (not ...
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0answers
29 views

Electron travel speed in spinning object [on hold]

My question is in the hypothetical circumstance that you could spin a disk or something close to the speed of light how would that effect the travel of electrons through the material. Picture a circle ...
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0answers
31 views

Electron in a Magnetic Field: Force parallel to velocity?

According to the four-force given in this question, Force is parallel to velocity. But the Lorentz Force is perpendicular to velocity in a constant magnetic field. Is this a contradiction? [a ...
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3answers
66 views

Do hot metals radiate? (Thermography)

I was looking into thermography which talks about emissivities of metals and other materials. Polished metals which have low emissivity appear to be colder in thermal imaging cameras even if they are ...
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2answers
2k views

How do you make a spherical radio wave?

A vertical rod, a usual dipole, produces radio waves in the horizontal plane, mostly in two opposite directions: If that is possible, how do you produce a spherical EM radiation? should the ...
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1answer
55 views

How does Compton scattering demonstrate particle over wave behavior?

Why is Compton scattering thought to demonstrate light's behavior as a particle over that as a wave. I'm interested in the thoughts at the time of Compton, but also how it contradicts current theory ...
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3answers
70 views

Why don't E&M fields change orientation after hitting a surface?

In essentially every derivation of the Fresnel equations, the general problem of radiation hitting a surface at a certain angle is broken into two parts (out of which we hope the solution any general ...
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2answers
31 views

What is the player's role in the functioning of a theremin?

I recently see a video on how the theremin works, and wasn't satisfied with the answer. I watched around, but they all seem to give the same explanation. A diagram as below is given, and it is ...
2
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1answer
29 views

Wave Velocity vs. Phase Velocity

I am trying to understand the difference between 'wave velocity' and 'phase velocity'. I know that generally they are equal, but when is that not the case? I, of course, tried to google it, and ...
21
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1answer
805 views

How can my window not scramble the image of my yard?

How can an image pass through a window if the atoms in the glass randomly emit photons in any direction? I've read that glass is transparent because the atoms don't readily adsorb visible light, so it ...
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1answer
42 views

A single light-wave's ability to divide into two halves?

We know from the double-slit experiment conducted "one photon at-a-time" that a light-wave, upon encountering two closely-spaced apertures, is able to split into two halves and travel through both. ...
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0answers
31 views

How much energy is there at a single point? [closed]

If we were to take all energy available in one point in spacetime located near the surface of earth, how much electric current could we generate ? In other words, if we could do the sum of all the ...
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1answer
47 views

How to shield myself from the LTE radiation coming from my phone while working on my Laptop? [closed]

I am connecting to the internet with the tethering option on my phone. I wonder if there is a way to shield myself from the LTE radiation (Long-Term Evolution, commonly marketed as 4G) as I am exposed ...
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2answers
39 views

What exactly are EM waves? [closed]

What exactly are EM waves? Wave is just a graph of the intensity of energy at the given point in space right? At a particular point in space, we detect that energy is going up ad then down with each ...
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1answer
23 views

Frequency dependence of electromagnetic reflection

I was surprised to see that the Fresnel equations for reflection depends on refractive index and angle of incidence, but they do not depend on frequency. Why is this case? Are they restricted to ...
27
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3answers
4k views

Why do X-rays go through things?

I always heard that the smaller the wavelength, the more interactions take place. The sky is blue because the blue light scatters. So why is this not true for X-rays, which go through objects so ...
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1answer
52 views

Is fire more harmful than a phone?

I have read somewhere that the higher the frequency of electromagnetic radiation, the higher the damage it causes to your body, and visible light has a very high frequency in comparison to microwave ...
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0answers
10 views

Why does a 2-sided propagating EM wave become 1-sided if B is made proportional to E?

If you simulate the propagation of an electromagnetic wave in 1D free space (no charges or currents) with initial conditions of $E\neq0$ and $B=0$, and you look at a movie of $E$ vs time, then after ...
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0answers
26 views

Problem with understanding boundary conditions in electromagnetism

In some books on electrodynamics they stress that electric current won't radiate if it is placed on a perfect electrical conductor (PEC), citing image theory: exactly opposite current will appear and ...
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0answers
90 views

How to derive equation for time it takes photons to diffuse through the Sun

I am wanting to use the Rosseland radiative heat flux equation to find the time it takes for photons to diffuse through the sun. The answer I am wanting to derive is: $$\tau_D~\frac{\rho \bar C_p ...
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0answers
41 views

Gradient of Greens function

This question is about Jackson's equation (10.75) and (10.77) I don't know the step in between these two equations.I'm not sure what our unit vector $n'$ will be here and how can we take gradient of ...
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0answers
40 views

Can 2 photons make up the same colour as another photon?

So, my question deals with the excited electron shown above. (1st diagram) This electron can return to its ground state by either of two ways. One of the ways involves the emission of 2 photons. ...
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1answer
20 views

Mie theory: Interpretation in terms of intensity

I'm trying to understand Mie theory. For this I'm reading the book "Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles" by Bohren and Huffman. The derivation of the formulas is fine, but I'm stuck ...
3
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1answer
39 views

How much ionizing (carcinogenic) radiation is one exposed to on a commercial flight, what are the sources, and how could exposure be minimized? [closed]

I don't know if this is the best place to ask this question, but I figure a physics-based answer would be the most satisfying. I'd be happy to be convinced I'm being paranoid about protecting an ...
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0answers
27 views

Detecting position of electrons [duplicate]

To detect particles like electrons, why would the accuracy of the position determined be affected by the wavelength of EM wave used?
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0answers
17 views

Why the angular distribution of the X-rays from Roentgen tube is not along the decelaration of electrons? [duplicate]

As I understand the X-ray generation from Roentgen tube, is a result from the bremsstralung (and also characteristic lines): from decelerating electrons in the presence of the potential of heavy ...
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2answers
45 views

Definition of a ray?

The typical definition of a ray and the one that I was initially taught was that a ray was a line perpendicular to the wave front. However, when reading up on birefringence it seems as though there ...
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1answer
17 views

Reflection coefficient of surface with sources

While solving the maxwell equation for surface where both surface charge and current density are present to calculate its reflection coefficient, i.e. $$\nabla \times E=-\frac{\partial}{\partial ...
0
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1answer
20 views

How to find Intensity from field of train of pulses?

Lets say there is process that emits a field $E$ every half cycle of a driving laser pulse (in particular, high harmonic generation). The total field is $$ E(t) = \cdots + ...
3
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1answer
37 views

Relation between the electromagnetic wave and quantum wavefunction

I have been thinking about this for a while. I think I misunderstood something about the basics of quantum waves. Let's look at light diffracted in conditions similar to the double slit experiment. ...
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1answer
44 views

Interference of light waves question

We were recently asked to solve a question in class which goes as follows: In a modified Young's double slit experiment, a monochromatic uniform and parallel light beam of wavelength $6000$ ...
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0answers
21 views

Intensity of interfering light waves

I had a conceptual question above light wave interference. Suppose that two light beams, each of an irradiance $I$ interfering on an area $A$ of a screen, such that all of the light from each beam ...
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0answers
31 views

How can there be E and B fields inside waveguides?

A hollow waveguide that is made of conducting material allows for the existence of an electromagnetic wave inside it which propagates from one end to the other. However, conductors are known to ...
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1answer
51 views

What causes electromagnetic waves to propagate in free space?

In free space, $\rho=0$ and $J=0$, so there are no electromagnetic sources/sinks. Maxwell's equations thus reduce to: $\nabla\cdot E = 0$ $\nabla\cdot B = 0$ $\nabla\times E = -\frac{\partial ...
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0answers
18 views

What does relative permitivity of medium mean and what does it depend on?

Does relative permitivity have someting to do with the polarization of medium , like for example how in inside the capacitor magnitude of electric field would be less due to a smaller opposing field ...
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0answers
13 views

the inner self-inductance of coaxial cable using integration

I'm trying to calculate the inner inductance of a coaxial cable using integration knowing that the answer is : $L=μl/8π$ i get the same answer when i take a cylindrical shell of thickness $dr$ but the ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Photoelectric effect on charged plate

As far as I know, to observe the photoelectric effect, one has to expose a metal surface to high-energy radiation. But what happens if the surface has a surplus of electrons? What is the energy needed ...
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1answer
60 views

Why is glass green?

When I look at a glass block at an angle the edges appear green, but when I look at the edge sideways, so that is directly in front of my eyes it appears transparent. Why?
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2answers
52 views

Speed of RF waves and IR waves is same as 3 * 10 ^8 m/s?

In space,if we want to measure the speed of RF waves and IR waves it will be roughly 3 * 10^8 m/s ( SPEED OF RF WAVES = SPEED OF IR WAVES = 3* 10^8 M/S ) is this correct ? The different in the ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Speed of light in vacuum in special relativity

In special relativity, the speed of visible light is defined as a constant. But visible light is only a small part of the electromagnetism field. So why?
0
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2answers
32 views

Difference between scattering and refraction?

I while back I learnt that when light is incident on a dipole the dipole will scatter the light, and when it is incident on a material of a different refractive index then the light refracts. From the ...
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2answers
37 views

Is the electromagnetic spectrum bounded somehow? [duplicate]

Is there a maximum frequency that an electromagnetic wave can support?
3
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1answer
44 views

Is the photoelectric effect 'Ionising Radiation'?

According to the definition on Wikipedia, ionising radiation is radiation which has sufficient energy to remove an electron from an atom. So a high energy gamma ray is definitely ionising, but visible ...
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2answers
49 views

Description of a photon and quanta

Could someone please help to clarify the difference between a photon and a quanta? Below is my current understanding - please correct me if I am wrong. A photon - is a 'wave particle' of 'light'. I ...