Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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Light's oscillation in time

Electromagnetic waves have electric (and magnetic) fields that oscillate spatially and with time. But light, moving at the universal speed limit, is a "space-like" object according to relativity since ...
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Is this fine to think of light as the following? [on hold]

Is light quantums (increments [photons]) of the electromagnetic waves which are synchronized by oscillations of electromagnetic fields
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59 views

How to remember the Electromagnetic Spectrum?

This may sound off-topic but I am in a severe need of remembering the following shown Electromagnetic Spectrum along with the frequencies and wavelengths. So far I have looked at several mnemonics but ...
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15 views

Why are certain opaque objects so biased?

Why is it that most of the opaque objects only block em waves in the visible spectrum but fail to block waves with frequency higher and(or) lower than the visible spectrum?
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62 views

What causes the disturbances in fields that produce electromagnetic waves?

I know that electromagnetic radiation is synchronized by oscillations of electric and magnetic fields, but what causes the disturbance in the fields to create the waves in the first place?
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67 views

Induction and electromagnetic fields

I've got a few questions on induction and electromagnetic fields. My current understanding of induction and electromagnetic fields is that, when electricity/current flows through a wire, it creates an ...
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39 views

Lasers : Threshold Pump Power for Laser Oscillation [closed]

I was working my way through some basic laser problems , when I cam across this one : Consider the ruby laser for which we have the following values of the various parameters: $N =$ $1.6$ x ...
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48 views

Can electromagnetic fields be used to deconstruct and reconstruct molecular bonds?

I was thinking one day and came up with a theory after reading about how scientists were studying anti-matter by using electro magnetic fields to separate matter from the anti-matter they made. It got ...
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37 views

What is a lineshape function $g(\omega_0)$ in a Laser?

I am a newbie to the world of lasers and was working my way through some basic problems, when I encountered this one: Optical Electronics, A.K. Ghatak and K. Thyagarajan (Cambridge University ...
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ratio between conduction current and displacement current

First, recall that Maxwell displacement current for a plane wave is $$ \vec j_D = \epsilon \partial_t \vec E = \epsilon \partial_t (\vec E_o cos(\vec k \cdot \vec r - \omega t)) = \epsilon \omega ...
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15 views

Can a patterned microwave beam with alternating frequencies be created?

Is there a way to create a patterned microwave beam with alternating frequencies such that, in the far field, from top to bottom of beam, there is repeated pattern of Wavelength one, Wavelength two, ...
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68 views

What can happen when 2.3*10^28 positrons collide with 2.3*10^28 electrons? [closed]

I'm interested in this question after a writer friend asked me what happens when a human gets bombarded with positrons. Didn't want to post this under scifi because I want more "scientific" answers... ...
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Energy conservation if photon absorbed below resonance

Suppose I have some quantum system (like atom) with excitation energy $E_{exc}$ which is homogeneously broadened due to finite lifetime. I shine light with narrow spectrum centred around energy ...
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Why are electromagnetic waves called waves even though they don't travel through a medium?

If waves are defined as the oscillation of a medium, why are electromagnetic waves called waves as they do not need a medium to travel through?
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32 views

Does array gain violate the laws of physics or not?

I am a bit disturbed lately since I don't know the answer this basic problem. Say we have a standard isotropic antenna with some fixed parameters (load impedance, etc), and we feed this antenna with ...
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2answers
36 views

What happens to electric field of a bar magnet?

Electromagtic waves say that Magnetic field and electric field exist orthogonal to each other. Also all electric field has some magnetic field and vice-versa (As I understand). In that case what is ...
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980 views

Detectability of interstellar messages

Recently a debate started whether it is a good idea to send more messages into space in the hope of having alien civilizations receive them. There are some predecessors, most notably the 1974 Arecibo ...
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16 views

Phased non linear array antenna - First Sidelobe

I have a problem I cannot seem to solve and I REALLY need some help. It's about phased-array antennas whose dipoles are not equally spaced, not equally phased, not equally fed (amplitude). Let's ...
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1answer
46 views

Why isn't a metal pot a faraday cage?

Someone left their cell phone here, it was ringing like crazy. I stuck it in a metal pot with a metal lid to shut it up, it still rang. I later put it in a safe, it still rang, but so muffled as to ...
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30 views

What do you call this “asymmetric polarization”?

I am considering this unusual polarization of EM waves: which travels in the x-direction and has magnetic and electric fields as shown. This can be produced by non-oscillatory currents. What name ...
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Why don't electrons return to their ground state immediately after photoexcitation? [duplicate]

In terms of photoluminescence, why don't the electrons, which have been excited by photons earlier, immediately fall down to their ground state and reemit a photon? In other words, why does ...
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2answers
73 views

How does a radiometric infrared camera estimate an objects temperature?

Say we have an infrared camera which measures some amount of radiation, in a spectral bandwidth which is given, between wavelength $\lambda_1$ and $\lambda_2$ from a perfect black body. How is it ...
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77 views

Proof that electric and magnetic fields in a EM wave are perpendicular

Is there a general proof, that for electromagnetic waves the magnetic and electric fields are perpendicular? The only ones I can find only focus on plane waves.
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25 views

reflecting foil on window

Assumptions: A house window acts as a cavity resonator, and so can be treated as a blackbody. If the room temperature is 20 C then the outgoing radiation is 418 W/m2 If the outside temperature is ...
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16 views

Mosotti-Clausius formula from the first principles

I would like to understand how to get the Mosotti-Clausius formula for the dielectric susceptibility of a dielectric material with spherically symmetric molecules from the first principles, where by ...
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0answers
28 views

Why do aromatic rings absorb in UV?

Why do aromatic rings absorb in UV? I think that the whole molecule absorb light which causes transition of an electron to another molecule orbital.
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Why is the bottom part of a candle flame blue?

What’s the explanation behind the bottom part of a candle flame being blue? I googled hard in vain. I read this. I don’t understand how it’s explained by the emission of excited molecular radicals in ...
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Can light emit light?

How and why does the Huygens principle really work? I mean, does it always work? The Huygens principle: Every point on a wave-front may be considered a source of secondary spherical wavelets ...
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behavior of the electric field of an incoherent light wave

If I am not mistaken, an incoherent light wave is a light wave made out of waves with random phases: it consist of photons with random phases. Now I am wondering what we would see if we would ...
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51 views

How exactly dentists X-Ray works?

At dentist, before operation I got one tooth X-Rayed. I had to hold a small tablet inside my mouth and the scanner was positioned next to my cheek. The device look like this: How does this machine ...
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Why does light not destructively interfere when coming from an object?

This is something that I have been wondering for a long time. How come when an object is scattering light, the light does not destructively interfere? Should we not be able to find for every light ...
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43 views

Time reversed Abraham-Lorentz reaction force

The Abraham-Lorentz radiation reaction force on a charged particle is given by: $$\mathbf{F_{rad}} = \frac{q^2}{6\pi\epsilon_0c^3}\mathbf{\dot{a}}$$ I understand the situation where one fires a ...
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2answers
63 views

Field Vectors and satisfying Maxwell's equations

If I have an electric field that its direction is parallel to the direction of the wave propagation, it will not satisfy Gauss's law for vacuum. However we can say it satisfies Gauss's law for ...
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1answer
52 views

Why does a non-contact voltage detector light up when you touch a plasma ball with the other hand?

I am doing a science experiment and we decided to try holding a non-contact voltage detector up to plasma ball. We were surprised that it would light up when it was 3 ft away from the plasma ball. I ...
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43 views

Extremely long wavelength electromagnetic radiation

High frequencies are used to eject electrons, because only electrons can really be affected at such a small wavelength scale. But could an electromagnetic wave have such a ridiculously low frequency ...
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97 views

Is there something equivalent to a diode for light?

In electronics a diode is a component allowing current passing in only one direction, and blocking the other side. I'm wondering if something similar exists for visible light or other EM waves, like ...
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120 views

Do electromagnetic fields are already present all over the space? [closed]

Consider a region $R$ in space without any source of electromagnetic field. Now put a source $S$ of electromagnetic wave in the vicinity of $R$ so that at time $t=0$, $S$ starts radiating ...
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405 views

How do I find the right lens for my laser?

I purchased this line laser recently and I'm running into a bit of an issue. The laser shoots out at a 120 degree angle which is perfect. However, once the laser spreads to about 4.25 inches, I need ...
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1answer
42 views

How to convert EM fields to EM waves?

How a body producing electricity and magnetic fields become a body radiating electromagnetic waves?
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EM waves and fields

According to wikipedia, electromagnetic waves are "synchronized oscillations of electric and magnetic fields that propagate at the speed of light". I understand what it means in theory. But in ...
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0answers
10 views

Force on a small conductor in an EM wave

What forces act on a small, flat conductor subjected to electromagnetic radiation, if the conductor is much smaller than the wavelength? My guess is that the magnetic field component of the wave ...
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1answer
49 views

Is a superconductor perfectly opaque?

Because of the Meissner effect, no magnetic fields can pierce through the body of a superconductor. Since EM waves need both their electric and magnetic field components, it cannot pierce through the ...
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1answer
622 views

Why is black the best emitter?

Why are emitters colored black better emitters than other colors? Why is white a worse emitter?
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2answers
68 views

Why does General Relativity predict more light deflection than Netwonian Physics?

If one looks at the limit as light's mass approaches zero, Newtonian Physics predicts a deflection of light (this can be seen by the fact that all objects are accelerate the same due to gravity.) ...
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29 views

Probe/Sensor-design for pulsed electromagnetic field

So I have a wire/coil, acting as a sender, which has a pulsed signal as described below. I would like to build a sensor/probe that can detect the electric field at a distance, where the primary goal ...
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X-rays scattered at righ angles of the incident ones: are they polarised?

Basic books dealing with the interaction of X-rays with matter ussually don't mention anything about the polarisation, but I read somewhere that X-rays scattered in matter are linearly polarized, ...
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1answer
64 views

Momentum around an accelerated electron

Assume that an electron is accelerated along the +x-axis. The electron will radiate electromagnetic energy and momentum in every direction. But it seems to me that the EM momentum it radiates in ...
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20 views

The Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral for plane waves?

A paper gives the following result on the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral for plane waves \begin{equation} \oint_{S_\infty}\left[p(\pmb{r}^\prime)\nabla G(\pmb{r},\pmb{r}^\prime)-\nabla ...
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1answer
115 views

Blackbody radiation in thermally inhomogeneous environment

The power radiated by the backbody is according to Stefan-Boltzmann law $$ P = \sigma \varepsilon A (T^4-T_{env}^{4} ).$$ Is the parameter $T_{env}$ supposed to be only the temperature in the near ...
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1answer
142 views

Is it really possible to “discover” the speed of light with a microwave oven?

I've seen a number of sites/videos online that describe a method for measuring the speed of light, using a microwave oven and a chocolate bar. For example, this video on youtube. The basic idea is to ...