Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

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29 views

How to understand that the electromagnetic wave propagates?

Don't the electric field and magnetic field have infinite range? When a charged particle moves, the electric field vectors at two different locations A and B should start to change at exactly the same ...
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1answer
37 views

Current Electricity

If $$ \frac{dQ}{dt} = I $$ and if an accelerated current produces E.M. waves (radiation), does that mean $d^2Q/dt^2$ (second derivative of a charge w.r.t. time) will give me the magnitude of the wave ...
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1answer
16 views

Correct terminology for when neutral atom is ionized due to an electric field?

An electric field will cause an induced dipole in neutral atoms when present - I presume that if the field were strong enough the magnitude of the polarization could exceed a critical length and cause ...
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0answers
8 views

Show that the electric dipole term vanishes for a particular current

I'm interested to show that given a ring with radius a where there's a current $I_0 \cos \omega t$ ($I_0$ is a constant) there is no radiation due to the electric dipole term (appearing in the ...
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0answers
20 views

Counting modes Rayleigh-Jeans

In the derivation of the Rayleigh-Jeans Law, we count the number of EM modes in a square cavity. After calculating the number of allowed modes due to boundary conditions, we multiply it by a factor of ...
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0answers
73 views

What maximum theoretical speed can reach spaceship with EM Drive in space? [on hold]

There are several studies (by Institute of Aerospace Engineering, Technische Universität Dresden and by NASA) that are concluding that the EM Drive produces thrust. So I am wondering: if the EM Drive ...
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3answers
54 views

Question about intensity of EM waves

For electromagnetic wave if it's reflected from a perfect conductor standing wave can be form. I wonder why Poynting vector can be used to describe the intensity of standing EM wave. (see p.19 of ...
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1answer
47 views

What is the mix of ordinary mass vs. ordinary radiating energy in the universe?

I have seen data showing that the estimated mix of dark energy in the universe is 68.3%, the mix of dark matter is 26.8% and the mix of ordinary matter is 4.9%1. However, within "ordinary matter," ...
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0answers
26 views

mixing colour of light

I have seen blue and yellow colours mix to form a light green shade. How can we explain this phenomenon, both in case of light and physical substances like paint ?
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22 views

Absorption of Ultraviolet rays vs. Absorption of Infrared rays [closed]

How does the effect produced by absorption of UV rays differ from that produced by IR?I read that UV undergoes electronic absorption whereas IR undergoes vibrational absorption. Does this mean that IR ...
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2answers
45 views

will osmium or lead stop all high-energy photons in a shorter distance?

I remember seeing a similar question to this one on Physics StackExchange once. Most of the answers were to the effect of "I don't like the way this question is phrased, so I will insult your ...
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1answer
32 views

Can light (electromagnetic radiation) cause electromagnetic induction in a wire?

Can light, as an electromagnetic wave, cause electromagnetic induction in a wire by passing near the wire? Does a moving electromagnetic wave cause a varying magnetic field in the region near the ...
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0answers
43 views

How to model radio wave attenuation by seawater?

From the very limited literature I can find regarding radio waves in saline-water solutions (as in seawater), I have been able to find very few corroborating models of radio wave propagation through ...
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2answers
37 views

Do all the electromagnetic radiations have dual nature i.e. particle nature & wave nature?

I have studied the dual nature of the light as particle nature & wave nature. A photon of light energy can knock a single electron out of certain metals (usually having less ...
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0answers
21 views

Wideband metamaterials in mobile-telecommunications bands

Were there any metamaterials (materials, settings, geometry) studied that are non-resonant (not frequency selective) in the frequencies between 700 MHz and 2700 MHz, therefore useful for mobile ...
1
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1answer
26 views

Layer of graphene on reflector of an antenna

First of all I have no idea how well graphene "sticks" to other metals, but let's suppose it does (well, if I may please ask you to reply to the "stick" question too...). Given the material great ...
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1answer
41 views

What color does graphene glow when heated?

If you heat graphene hot enough, what color would it glow? Is the color within the visible range?
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0answers
9 views

What is difference between Irradiation & Radiosity?

I have a question in Radiometry: What is difference between "Irradiation" & "Radiosity" in Radiometry? Assumption: the emission & the reflection are specular. I know these physical ...
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0answers
22 views

Why are most antennas in cellular networks +/- 45° polarized?

I've just been asked a strange question that I cannot find an answer to (even on the internet it seems I can't find any explanation for this) and I ended up wondering why most of the antennas which ...
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1answer
41 views

What is the strength of the magnetic field required to penetrate an average human body?

Introduction Suppose you are an experimental nanobot researcher trial-ling a new form of medication that involves activation and control of nanobots within the cells of the interior of the human body ...
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1answer
65 views

What does a light wave look like (3d model)

What does a light wave look like? The only models I can seem to find online are 2D waves, they just look like sin() graphs. I have seen the models of the two components of "light waves" (electric ...
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1answer
27 views

Is there a limit to how thin EM radiation can be spread out?

Sorry if this is completely off base but from my understanding, electromagnetic radiation, such as light, becomes less intense the further away it gets from the source. I assume the reduction of ...
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1answer
39 views

Do electrons emit radiation due to gravity [duplicate]

Do electrons accelerating in the presence of a gravitational field radiate due to this acceleration?
1
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1answer
88 views

What is a wavelength of an EM wave physically?

This might be a silly question given I am a physics undergrad, but I was suddenly confused. Usually when EM hit a gap they diffract through the gap. But if the gap is too small, diffraction can't take ...
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1answer
38 views

$\sqrt{\frac{\omega ^2}{c^2}-k_z^2}$ in cylindrical harmonics

The radial component of the solution of the wave equation in cylindrical coordinates is $$J_\nu \bigg(\rho\sqrt{\frac{\omega ^2}{c^2}-k_z^2}\,\,\bigg).$$ But I always thought that $\frac \omega c$ ...
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2answers
38 views

Classical absorption of radiation

How does electromagnetic radiation get absorbed by an object (like a black body) in the classical regime? In the classical picture, electromagnetic radiation is produced by the movement of charges, ...
1
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1answer
36 views

Light / TEM wave in a hollow waveguide

I'm cramming for my EMF exam, and a question came up: Light in free space is an example for a TEM wave, isn't it? (Maybe thats already my mistake) And we learned that in a hollow waveguide only TE ...
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2answers
89 views

“X-rays”, “gamma rays”, “sun rays”… But electromagnetic waves are NOT rays and DO NOT consist of rays?

In a separate question I'm struggling to figure out the nature of EM waves. But it's a vast topic and I'm trying to narrow it down to small specific questions. It turns out that all electromagnetic ...
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1answer
103 views

Is the wobbly rope depiction of a radio wave inherently wrong? And how do vectors of parallel waves align with each other?

I don't have a scientific education, yet I'm scientifically curious. Among other things, I'm struggling to understand the nature of electromagnetic waves. What I have recently realized is that the ...
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0answers
42 views

How can electric and magnetic fields have any component in the direction of propagation of electromagnetic waves?

In case of waveguides we talk about $E$ and $H$ having non zero component in the direction of propagation of wave. But the entire basis of EMW is that $E$ and $H$ are perpendicular to the direction of ...
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1answer
38 views

Determining path of light through a nanolens

In the case of light passing through stacked liquids, we can use a ray approximation of the path of light to determine the path taken through each layer of liquid using Snell's law. From all the ...
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1answer
68 views

Is it possible for the light (photons) to turns into normal electromagnetic signal?

I want a theoretical opinion about this question: The relativistic Doppler Shift equation for the light is $$\frac{f_s}{f_o}=\sqrt{\frac{1+\beta}{1-\beta}}$$ where $\beta=v/c$ is the velocity of the ...
2
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1answer
92 views

How can radiation be a transverse wave? Does light really resemble a rope? How can a 3D field be a medium for non-spatial 1D waves? Need mental model

I understand longitudinal waves. For example, I've got a clear mental modal of air waves: a slice of air becomes overcompressed, then the slice next to it becomes overcompressed and the first slice ...
4
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0answers
80 views

The logarithmic decay of WIFI

I have been told that Wi-Fi, LTE etc signal strength fall of as $$\propto \frac1{\log(r)}$$ where $r$ is the distance. I am wondering why this is. I better explain what I mean with this question. ...
4
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1answer
56 views

How can I measure the ability of sunglasses to block UV radiation?

The most important function of sunglasses is to protect the eye against UV radiation. When they don't adequately filter ultraviolet (UV) light, it may even be worse to wear them than not to, because ...
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1answer
27 views

How can I find the radiance over a finite range of wavelengths using Planck's Law?

I'm working on a small programming project involving Planck's Law, and I keep getting errors. I'm fairly certain this is due to a misunderstanding of physics on my behalf. Basically, I am trying to ...
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0answers
23 views

Spectrum of constant accelerated particle

Suppose we accelerate a proton with a constant Potential U . The particle is accelerated from a zero initial kinetic energy to a maximum kinetic energy of $E_{c,f}$ within a distance L . From ...
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0answers
23 views

X-ray characteristic radiation

A high speed electron knocks an orbital electron in the atom. This collision creates a vacancy that is filled by an electron from a higher energy level. My question is, what happen with both electrons ...
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2answers
52 views

A plane electromagnetic wave - phase change - amplitude

A plane electromagnetic wave has the shape: $\vec{E}(\vec{r},t)=E_0\cdot cos(\vec{k}\vec{r}-\omega t)\cdot \vec{e}_y$ $\vec{B}(\vec{r},t)=(B_1\cdot cos(\vec{k}\vec{r}-\omega t)+B_2\cdot ...
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0answers
23 views

What is the equation to calculate the strength and radius of an electromagnetic pulse?

With this interesting answer on the blast force of a uniformly charged electron sphere, came another interesting question. What would be the strength and blast radius of an EMP launched from such a ...
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1answer
43 views

Can you use infra-red goggles (or similar principle) to see through mist and fog?

As per title really... fog is obviously quite opaque to visible light yet transparent to radio waves. What is the range of frequencies at which fog is opaque, and is either end of this range at a ...
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0answers
27 views

How to achieve transmission only at normal incidence?

Is there any material that only transmits normally incident radiation and reflects it when it's incident at any other angle? Or any way to achieve such an effect? For example, a mirror that if you ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Two questions about the nature of induced emf

I have two questions about magnetic induction (I am in university level introductory E and M so maybe my questions will be answered over the next few years): In the linear generator (shown below), I ...
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3answers
43 views

Antenna direction

I have a router with a wifi antenna that can be turned in any angle. I wonder what difference does the direction of the antenna make to the electromagnetic signals propagation? Where is the signal ...
0
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1answer
41 views

What is the frequency of each of the moving electrons in a DC current?

I know that the DC current has 0 frequency. But what about each individual moving electron that makes up that DC current? Of course there has to be a frequency as all moving electrons are vibrating at ...
3
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3answers
834 views

How does the heat of Sun come on Earth when there is no medium?

Sun is the most important source for life on Earth which gives sunlight and heat on Earth. But I was wondering like how does the heat of Sun come on Earth when there is no medium out there in space?
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1answer
31 views

Gaussian beam shape

In this diagram of a Gaussian beam, why does the radius vary with z position? Is it assumed that a Gaussian beam is always being focus by a lense? Why can the beam not go any smaller than $w_0$ and ...
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4answers
111 views

Has cosmic microwave background kept a constant frequency?

Has the frequency of CMBR changed at all since the beginning of the universe? Has it always had a microwave frequency or has the frequency increased/decreased over time or is the change due to factors ...
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2answers
84 views

Wave number of $\mathbf{E}$ field

If I have an $\mathbf{E}$ field: $$ \mathbf{E}_1 = x E_0 e^{-j(y-z) } $$ I think I can find its wave vector direction by finding the $\mathbf{H}$ field and then solving for the Poynting vector ...
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1answer
26 views

What wavelength of light is the term 'focal length' defined against? [closed]

Because different wavelengths of light are bent differently in a medium, the focal length ought to be different for each of them (which is why white light splits up into a rainbow). If I have a "25 mm ...