Propagating solutions to Maxwell’s equations in classical electromagnetism and real photons in quantum electrodynamics. A superset of thermal-radiation.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

3
votes
1answer
39 views

Reflection of two electromagnetic waves

Can Electromagnetic waves be reflected by another electromagnetic wave without having any physical (transparent or opaque) material (i.e., in free space with one wave having twice the amplitude of the ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Difference between sound wave and lightwave scattering [on hold]

What are the main differences between sound and light scattering starting with the Helmholtz equation? (Preferably by circular cylinder)
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Near field and Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

Why does Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) physics not concern itself with near field physics? All resonance wavelengths in NMR are much larger than bough sample, pick-up coil and excitation coil. ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Linear vs. quadratic dispersion relation

In wave mechanics the dispersion relation between frequency $\omega$ and wave number $k$ is linear: $$\omega_n=c k_n$$ But in quantum mechanics, based on Schrödinger's equation, one can show that we ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

Photons, electomagnetism

I read that photons are carriers of the electromagnetic force (one of the four fundamental forces). So, I would like to know what a photon has to do with, for example, working of a motor or ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Why can't de Broglie waves be electromagnetic in nature?

We know that the wavelength of de Broglie waves for a photon is same as that of the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation that carries this photon. Doesn't this prove that matter waves are em ...
1
vote
2answers
26 views

How the polarization of electromagnetic wave is determined?

What help us determine the polarization of electromagnetic wave . Does perpendicular electric and magnetic field determine it or does the direction of propagation ?
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Question on electromagnetic wave propagation [closed]

how to do part d of this question? i have done part 1 to three but part d is bit confusing.
6
votes
3answers
651 views

Is there a difference between the speed of light and that of a photon?

As in the title I am curious whether there is a difference between the speed of photon and the speed of light, and if there is what is the cause of such a difference?
0
votes
0answers
31 views

EM Fields Transmitted from an antenna and photons [duplicate]

What is the relationship between The EM waves (light) and photons in some context i studied light as photons and others as EM fields but how they are related....another questions : what's the name of ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Analogy for Rayleigh scattering

This morning's eclipse has me looking into Rayleigh scattering. I'm trying to think of a good analogy to explain it to somebody without getting too in-depth into electromagnetism and other subjects... ...
2
votes
0answers
50 views

Clarification about Bragg's law explanation

The Wikipedia has this illustration of Bragg's law and then says The two separate waves will arrive at a point with the same phase, and hence undergo constructive interference, if and only if ...
0
votes
3answers
35 views

Why radiant heat only travels as infra-red waves and not as other types of em waves like UV rays

Heat is a form of energy and em waves carry energy as momentum of photons. So, I think, radiant heat can travel at any frequency. Please correct me.
7
votes
2answers
462 views

Why are EM waves transverse?

I was reading Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics, specifically the section on plane waves. I can see that if we want a transverse wave traveling in the $z$ direction that we are only going to ...
3
votes
2answers
337 views

Who discovered that electromagnetic wave doesn't need a medium?

I have read that physicists in 19 century searching for the aether. They thought that light must have some medium to carry. When did they know that light and other electromagnetic wave doesn't need ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Electromagnetic interaction physical interpretation

Why do radio waves, X-ray and gamma rays penetrate through matter? Can anyone explain me this in terms of incident energy or wavelength of the photon and the effective cross-section that these photons ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Why is a particular wavelength favored by transmission through a thin film?

A sheet of glass is coated with a $500\text{ nm}$ thick layer of oil ($n=1.42$). For what visible wavelengths of light do the reflected waves interfere a) constructively? b) destructively? ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

What is the difference between xrays and ultra violet rays?

Do they differ in just frequency and wavelenght ? Or there is more about it
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Could an object higher than the stationary orbit be returned to the outgoing point on this orbit?

In the question Centrifuge speed of an object higher than a stationary orbit, I asked: Does an object higher than the stationary orbit move slower or faster around the world than the top of a tower ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

A confusion on Radiations emitted from a body [duplicate]

Suppose an atom is accelerated...Now the protons in its nucleus and the electrons in the orbits are also accelerated...So will they emit the electromagnetic radiations? Basically here the electrons ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

How can we derive that an accelerated charge particle will radiate EMWs?

All the properties of the electromagnetic entity is said to be fully described by the four golden rules of Electromagnetism : The Maxwell's Equations.How can we derive that a charged particle will ...
7
votes
0answers
74 views

Experimentally diminishing random errors for low wavelength UV observations

Part of the work that I do involves observations of solar low wavelength UV observations, specifically UV-B and UV-A II (up to 340nm). I have noticed that when I observe responses on a CCD or CMOS ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Is a smartphone with a radar possible? [closed]

Is any form of radar possible with the sensors in an iPhone 5s ? Could you use the speaker and microphone to do sonar?
1
vote
1answer
24 views

When is the displacement current equal to conduction current in case of a parallel plate capacitor being charged?

I came across a text - "Whenever a conduction current is oscillating in time, the displacement current is equal to the conduction current in case of parallel plate capacitor." I am not sure what's ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

What is the highest frequency directly detected?

The Feynman Lectures of Physics states: In fact, although we mentioned many frequencies, no phenomenon directly involving a frequency has yet been detected above approximately $10^{12}$ cycles per ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Rotating sheet of light

I am looking for references on "rotating sheets of light" generated from a point source. Mainly I am looking for applications. (I saw a use related to climate studies or weather forecasting, where a ...
1
vote
3answers
41 views

Difference between high-level and low-levels of electromagnetic radiation

can someone please explain me what we mean by 'high-level' or 'low-level' in electromagnetic radiation? for example, it is believed that high-level microwave radiation is harmful to human but not the ...
0
votes
0answers
67 views

How is Energy Distributed within a Electromagnetic Wave?

Let $$\hat{H}$$ Denote the full energy of the electromagnetic wave. Now is it right to assume that $$\hat{H}=\sqrt{2\hat{H}_y^2+\hat{H}_x^2}=\sqrt{2\hat{H}_z^2+\hat{H}_x^2}$$ If not, what is ...
1
vote
2answers
91 views

Can someone explain to me the concept of atmosphere opacity?

On this diagram, why is the atmospheric opacity shaped as it is? If we are able to see lights due to low atmospheric opacity, why can't we see radio waves, when the atmospheric opacity is so low ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Electric charge of light? [duplicate]

Light (or any radiation as a matter of fact) is an electromagnetic wave so why doesn't it have a electric charge associated with it? As far as I know only static or flowing electric chargers can ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Is the photon first a wave, then a particle? [duplicate]

When the 'photon' is emitted, it would reason that the result of the energy fluctuation that creates 'it' rather is created as an energy wave, which when measured by us or a surface, it 'becomes' as a ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Internal energy and photon absorption

I just wish to confirm whether my understanding is correct. I know that photon absorption/emission brings about quantised changes in electron energy levels. Photons (infrared) also interact with ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

How hot particles can get [duplicate]

One way in which an object is affected by temperature rise is that the wavelength of the radiation it emits is gets smaller and smaller. Another way of looking at it is that as an object gets hotter, ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Blackbody radiation through quantum mechanics perspective

While explaining black body radiation, the body is assumed as a cavity radiator and the radiations are due to the oscillating electrons. But we know that the electromagnetic radiation emitted is ...
1
vote
2answers
469 views

Is data which rides on the carrier frequency dangerous?

My understanding of broadcasting data via electromagnetic radition is, that the data "rides" on a carrier frequency on which it is radiated. I am aware of the fact, that those carrier frequencies are ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

Can we multiply an electromagnetic field?

can we multiply light by a sequence of reflections in a closed vessel? also, is light a part of EM wave? can we multiply the radio wave or EM wave from a transformer?
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Can various wavelengths participate in C/D Interference?

My question is can multiple wavelengths or at least two different wavelengths interfere with one another? I know that they usually have to be the 'same' wavelength, but you'd think they can vary a bit ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

If sound travels through matter what medium does light travel through? [duplicate]

So sound is a wave and is basically just vibrations, an atom vibrates causing another next to it vibrate and so on until it finally reaches our ears to become sound. If that's normally how waves ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Parallel electric and magnetic field in traveling wave

Can we have elctromagnetic waves which are characterized by parallel electric and magnetic field $\vec{E} || \vec{B}$ ? I am not talking here about free space, but maybe some kind of materials or ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

Why group velocity represents energy or information transmission? What relation between phase velocity and special relativity

I have two question, why group velocity represents energy or information transmission? what is the relation between phase velocity and Special relativity: why can it exceed C without violation of ...
2
votes
1answer
491 views

Dark matter a medium for light propagation

Is dark matter a candidate to fill void left by luminiferous ether as a medium for light travel?
2
votes
1answer
44 views

What does a supernova look like at its peak luminosity?

I know that in some types of supernovae, the cause of the increased luminosity is the radioactive decay of certain elements ejected during the explosion, so a question came to my mind. If the ejected ...
4
votes
1answer
501 views

What is the meaning of this “let there be light” joke?

A middle school teacher across the restaurant is wearing this shirt, and I certainly don't get it.
1
vote
1answer
53 views

How to calculate the differential scattering cross section?

I am doing some simulations with the Meep code to study some properties of a metal nanoparticle. The situation is this: an incident electromagnetic wave on a metal nanoparticle. By now I know how to ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

What would a laser beam's E-M waves actually look like if you zoomed in?

I am trying to understand how a real world beam of laser actually reflects the physics description of oscillating electromagnetic waves. So say we are looking side on at a vertically polarized laser ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

Why would a rotating charged sphere not have time varying electric field?

I have seen Gauss Law being used for a uniformly charged hollow sphere rotating with $\omega$. How is that valid to use Gauss law since it is an electrostatic law and if it is valid, why do we get a ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

The difference between EMR and lone Electric and Magnetic fields

I fail to understand the true difference between EMR and electric and magnetic fields. When current flows, there is an electric field due to the electron flow and a magnetic field, however no EMR ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Why does the second Weyl scalar describe electromagnetic radiation?

I've been reading about the null tetrad, the Weyl tensor, and the Newman-Penrose identities, and so I found out about the Weyl scalars. While the zeroth, first, third, and fourth scalars describe ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Angular momentum of light

Can someone explain the classical angular momentum in electromagnetic theory of light? If I shine elliptically polarised em wave on a black disc it rotates. I would like to know how to calculate ...