The study of the presence and flow of electric charge. Charges, currents, fields, potentials.

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2answers
225 views

Voltage in a circuit

Suppose I have a following circuit: I do not understand, why the potential difference between the points $c$ and $d$ is equal to the potential difference between the points $b$ and $a$? That is, ...
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0answers
95 views

Electrical properties of molten gallium arsenide

I'm looking for the resistivity and magnetic permeability of molten gallium arsenide, but can only seem to find the values for the solid material at room temperature (e.g., Wikpedia). Not even ...
12
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4answers
1k views

What could magnetic monopoles do that electrically charged particles can't?

I understand the significance to physics, but what can a magnetic monopole be used for assuming we could free them from spin ice and put them to work? What would be a magnetic version of electricity? ...
2
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1answer
2k views

How are excess charges distributed over non-spherical conductors?

My textbook gives the following explanation on how excess charges are spread over conductors: The excess charge on an isolated conductor moves entirely to the conductor's surface. However, ...
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1answer
72 views

Would the empirical behavior of a simple circuit match my model of it?

I have a practical problem in E&M which has baffled me and and my electrician. The copper water pipes in my house are carrying a current of small potential (~1V) AC current. Here is my ...
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0answers
126 views

About electric current analogy

my teacher gave me this analogy to the electric current , the wire is like a pearl necklace where the pearls can move, the current or the movement of electrons is like putting your fingers between 2 ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Total current of two sources in series? [closed]

Here is a question that a friend asked me. He had to an experiment in school and do some calculations afterwards. Those calculations require maximal current that the DC source can produce. He has ...
5
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1answer
2k views

Does rubber insulate lightning more effectively than air?

Last week, an Ars Technica writer was struck by lightning. He says that the 911 operators were concerned about whether or not he was wearing shoes at the time, but he didn't think it would make much ...
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1answer
271 views

Power in hydraulic analogy

In hydraulic analogy one compares electrical circuits with water circuits. For the electric case the formula $P = U \cdot I$ for the electric power holds. The analogous formula for water flow would ...
-4
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2answers
202 views

Street Light Interference Phenomenon [closed]

Is there a scientific approach that can explain the street light interference phenomenon? Everytime I walk past a Streetlight it turns off.
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0answers
24 views

Faraday Effect, Satellites, and Electromagnetic Atmosphere [duplicate]

If I launched a Satellite into orbit and dropped a silver wire caged in carbon fiber with aerodynamic wings (for support), would the Faraday effect of the wire traveling through earth's ...
0
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1answer
82 views

Lightning and Charge Displacement

There is something I don't really understand about flashes of lightning. When a flash occurs, how come electricity be transferred at the speed of light since electricity's displacement is very slow ? ...
0
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1answer
121 views

Current in AC circuit

The problem is to find the current on the capacitor. $I''$ should be correct, but I don't know how to construct the formula for $I'$. I managed to get the value for $I_c$ using Thevenin and Norton ...
0
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2answers
11k views

What happens when non-equal voltages are put in parallel? [duplicate]

If two batteries, say 2 volts and 5 volts, are connected in parallel, are there any problems? The higher voltage will then want to flow out, but also towards the lower 2 volt battery end, right?
1
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1answer
584 views

Why should a battery not give current in order to measure EMF?

Emf is the "potential difference (PD) across the terminals of a battery when it is giving no current to the circuit." What does "when it is giving no current mean"? Will the PD across the terminals ...
2
votes
1answer
129 views

Help Understanding Non-conservative Fields

While watching a video lecture, I became uncomfortable with the results, (around 35 mins). The professor draws an electric circuit with a 1V batter, and two resistors (1 and 9 ohms). He then ...
6
votes
3answers
12k views

Can the Earth's magnetic be used to generate electricity?

Since the Earth has a magnetic field, can it, in theory, be run through a conductive metal coil to create electricity?
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1answer
119 views

The nature of resistance at copper wire terminations

Speaker wire consists of twisted copper strands, around AWG 22 thru 10. As good consumers know, one must consider resistance when wiring speakers. How do the wire terminations contribute to the ...
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1answer
69 views

Contact electricity and photoelectric effect

Most universities provide an experiment about the photoelectric effect to determine $h$ by measuring the stop voltage against the light frequency and calculating the slope $h/e$. But mostly they also ...
3
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4answers
250 views

What is a “gravitational cell”?

I am not a physicist, and I don't understand the details of electromagnetism. Anyhow, I was looking for how the batteries work in Google. So, I came across this article: "How batteries work: A ...
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1answer
7k views

Volts, Amps, and Practical Electrical Knowledge [duplicate]

I've heard people say that high amperage or high voltage is dangerous to humans-aren't they both? And what are the advantages to high amperage versus high voltage? And how do you generate one or the ...
0
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5answers
137 views

The potentiality of the electric field

Could you please explain using just words why electric the field is potentially? I know the proof using integral: $$A = \int_{12}q\vec{E}\cdot{d}\vec{r} = qQ\int_{12}\frac{\vec{r}\cdot{d}\vec{r}}{r^3} ...
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2answers
3k views

Voltmeter forming a closed circuit

A battery is connected to a 10Ω resistor as shown in Figure 2. The emf (electromotive force) of the battery is 6.0 V. When the switch is open the voltmeter reads 6.0 V and when it is closed it ...
5
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1answer
3k views

How Special Relativity causes magnetism

So my physics teacher assigned us an article about how special relativity causes magnetism in a wire with a current, even with the low drift velocities of electrons in a current. It seemed that the ...
6
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3answers
15k views

Why does increasing the temperature of a thermistor decrease it's resistance?

Surely, upon an increase in temperature, the atoms within the thermistor would vibrate with more energy and therefore more vigorously, hence making the electrons flowing through the electric circuit ...
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1answer
1k views

Speakers and Static from Hands

Why is it that when you touch the a bare male end of a speaker feed that the speaker makes hissing noises? Is it just (eddy?) currents running through you?
4
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3answers
22k views

Different batteries connected in parallel

If we have 2 batteries one of emf x and the other is of emf y and we connect them in series we get an effective emf of x+y. But what if we connect them in parallel, how to calculate the emf now?
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2answers
593 views

Do black holes have charges?

Do black holes have charges? If so, how would they be measured? Also, does electricity behave the same way? Black holes affect photons, which are carriers of EM radiation, so do black holes have any ...
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2answers
334 views

Simple ohms law on a battery ? Paradox or conceptual error?

Suppose we have a regular pencil battery which supplies DC voltage $V$. Say we take copper wire and connect the ends of the battery to an $R$ ohms resistance. Then Ohm's law tells use the current in ...
4
votes
2answers
17k views

Why don't electric workers get electrocuted when only touching one wire? [duplicate]

I know that when electricians work on the poles on the streets, if they only touch one wire at a time they will be fine. However, from my understanding, the negative wire is connected to a large ...
4
votes
5answers
14k views

Why does the comb attract the pieces of papers if they're neutral?

When we rub our hairs with a comb, and then try to attract small pieces of paper, they're attracted by the comb. The pieces of the paper were not electrified before they were attracted. Then they ...
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3answers
1k views

What types of materials can be electrically charged by rubbing?

What types of materials can be electrically charged by rubbing? Is there a certain type of materials in which static electricity can be produced by rubbing together two different materials?
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4answers
4k views

Capacitor Charging and Discharging when connected to the ground

When we charge a capacitor using a battery and then remove the battery, the plates of capacitor becomes charged. One holds positive charge and the other one gets equal negative charge. o. k. ? Now ...
0
votes
2answers
12k views

Definition of electric charge and proper explanation

Is there a definition of electric charge and proper explanation of it? It is said "Electric charge is the physical property of matter that causes it to experience a force when close to other ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Charging Glass Rods

When we rub two glass rods with their respective pieces of silk cloth, the two glass rods would repel each other. What if we rub the glass rod against the other glass rod? Will they repel each other? ...
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2answers
2k views

Definition of Static Electricity

The result of an imbalance of electrons between objects is called static electricity. It is called "static" because the displaced electrons tend to remain stationary after being moved from one ...
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0answers
64 views

Capacitors discharging in series [duplicate]

If you connect positive plate of a charged capacitor to ground, it doesn't get discharged. Now consider $4$ capacitors of equal capacitance connected in series to a $10\, \mathrm{V}$ battery. Connect ...
1
vote
5answers
776 views

Relativistic charge density in a closed loop

When charges of conductance are at rest, there is an average distance between them. The relativistic origin of magnetic field says that distances between electrons shrink when they are set into a ...
0
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2answers
590 views

Electric shock from a power line [duplicate]

A bird perches on a bare high power line and nothing happens to it. A man standing on ground touches the same line and gets a fatal shock. why?
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3answers
186 views

Voltage of open circuit

A battery with emf $\varepsilon$ and internal resistance $r$ is connected with a resistor $R$ in the following open circuit. What is the voltage $V_{ab}=V_a-V_b$? The answer is $- ...
2
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1answer
667 views

Is it possible create current by spinning a charged sphere?

If we have a sphere which has $σ$ surface charge density and rotate it in axis z will this create current ? Is it possible without any potential difference ?
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2answers
3k views

Light bulbs, Wattage meaning? [closed]

Light bulbs, Wattage meaning? Two incandescent bulbs (120 V, 25 Watt) and (120 V, 500 Watt) connected to the same batteries. Which one shines brighter? And why?
1
vote
1answer
359 views

Joule heating due to the (slow) electron drift velocity?

I understand the concept of why the signal speed is higher than the electron drift velocity, but I can't understand the concept of joule heating. If electrons move slow then how do they produce a lot ...
3
votes
1answer
753 views

Why do aqueous solutions always “have to be” electrically neutral?

I was reviewing some analytical chemistry and stumbled upon a section that explained the imperfection of using a salt bridge. It said that the using dissimilar ions is a problem because in, for ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

The electric field of a conductive sphere containing a charge - grounded vs not grounded

Let's suppose we have a sphere but unlike theoretical ones it'll have some thickness say $\Delta r$ and inner radius $R$. What I was wondering about is how will it behave if we place some charge $q$ ...
2
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0answers
82 views

Current between supeconducting rings

How to calculate the current between two superconducting rings with radius r separated by a distance d? Please note that being unfamiliar to the concept of superconducting rings, I can't approach ...
5
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3answers
3k views

How electricity, and generating electricity works on the atomic level?

I am trying to understand the basics physics as to how electricity works. Unfortunately it seems most online material is either complex full blown mathematical equations, or water pump analogies. I ...
2
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3answers
463 views

Producing electricity from all wavelengths of electromagnetic spectrum

Is it possible to produce electricity from all wavelengths of electromagnetic spectrum beside visible light ?Like using gamma rays or x-rays .
3
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3answers
2k views

Is there any example where electric and magnetic fields are not perpendicular?

Perpendicular electric and magnetic field creates light or other electromagnetic waves. Is it a necessary property to have a perpendicular fields? If not what would happen when the fields are not ...
2
votes
7answers
10k views

Why is the charge transferred by electrons and not by protons?

Charges are transferred by electrons which we all know. But why can't it be transferred by protons? Well, I searched on Google where I found similar questions already being asked on many sites. ...