An electronic system, with closed loop current flow, and relative electrical potentials present across electrical components.

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1answer
104 views

Flux linkage of 2 coils in series

I have a question from magnetic circuits. I am an engineering student, therefore I will neglect some minor errors. There is a simple magnetic circuit with 2 coils ($C_1$ & $C_2$), with $N_1$ ...
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0answers
9 views

Phase difference in currents in parallel RC circuit

shouldn't the phase difference be 0. The potential difference across any branch at any instant should be V.so what's wrong ?btw correct answer is (C)
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1answer
17 views

On a AC to DC adapter there are +12v wire with 24A and -12v have 0.5A. How many amp this adapter will provide in total?

I have a PSU of a pc which is 500w. I want to charge a 12v 100ah battery which need 20 amp of current. Is this psu can provide current that I have wanted? Main question is On a AC to DC adapter ...
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1answer
26 views

Spherical 'capacitor' with only one charged plate

A question I came across asks about two concentric spherical conductors where only the inner sheet is charged. The question first asks to find the capacitance of such an arrangement. The first part ...
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7answers
1k views

Why is capacitance defined as charge divided by voltage?

I understand that capacitance is the ability of a body to store an electrical charge and the formula is $C=\frac{Q}{V}$. What I don't understand, however, is why it is defined as coulomb per volt. Of ...
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1answer
150 views

Internal Resistor in a Diode

When we talk about the resistance of a diode (of the P and N region), is this resistance like the one inside an Electro-Motive Force or it acts like a normal resistor (external electric field exist)? ...
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0answers
16 views

Solving traveling wave using the shooting method

The spatially-dependent Hodgkin-Huxley equation for a cylindrical dendrite or unmyelinated axon: where $\frac{a}{2\rho}\frac{\partial^2V}{\partial x^2}$ is a diffusion term $a$ is the fiber radius, ...
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3answers
2k views

How is a potential difference created between two points?

I would like to know how potential difference is created between two points?Is potential difference created by adding more electrons at one side?If that's the case how to add more electrons at one ...
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3answers
83 views

Why is $\text{R}$ resistance in $\text{V=IR}$? [on hold]

Today I studied about Ohm's law which states- The current through a conductor between two points is directly proportional to the voltage across the two points.By introducing constant of ...
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1answer
135 views

How do the different types of energy apply to voltage in a circuit

I was just wondering what happens in a circuit in terms of different types of energy transformations. If you apply a voltage to a circuit then electrons start moving (very slowly). Since the electrons ...
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2answers
404 views

Capacitors in a series circuit with dielectric

When a dielectric slab is inserted between the plates of one of the two identical capacitors in Fig. 25-23, do the following properties of that capacitor increase, decrease, or remain the same: (a) ...
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5answers
634 views

Why is there a potential difference?

The question then asks for the potential difference between $X$ and $Y$, which is claimed to be $3.6\text{ volts}%$. Why would there be a potential difference in this case? If I connect a lightbulb ...
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1answer
30 views

Charging of a battery

A battery has an Emf 6 Volts. It is completely discharged. It is charged by maintaining a potential difference of 9 Volts across it. If the internal resistance of the discharged battery is 10 ohms, ...
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1answer
17 views

Does the thermal expansion of a conductor contribute to its change in resistance when it is heated?

We know that the resistance of a conductor varies with a change in temperature and we are taught that this change occurs due to the change in resistivity of the material but does the thermal expansion ...
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2answers
38 views

State why the value of the internal resistance of cell $B$ is not required for the determination of $E$ [closed]

Given that the current is zero around cell B. I do not understand why potential difference across XJ is equal to EMF of E. It seems to me that, it is not following Kirchhoff second law.
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2answers
24 views

Use of rheostat in a potentiometer practical?

in potentiometer practical why a rheostat is used in series to potentiometer wire? as we move the jokey the primary circuit current will also change. so is it to flow same amount of current by change ...
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2answers
31 views

What is the player's role in the functioning of a theremin?

I recently see a video on how the theremin works, and wasn't satisfied with the answer. I watched around, but they all seem to give the same explanation. A diagram as below is given, and it is ...
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0answers
2k views

Difference between rheostat and potentiometer & How connections are made to a simple rheostat? [closed]

I am confused about connecting wires to a rheostat. Can you please name and explain the parts of rheostat? Also how do we know which end of rheostat is to be used in circuits? In the last picture ...
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5answers
44 views

Why current in series circuit is the same?

I have read in the internet that the charges do not have any other path to go and they must go through the same in a series circuit,hence the current is same. It was quite convincing but what ...
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1answer
25 views

Capacitor in AC circuit

Can someone explain to me the process of discharging of a capacitor when the EMF of AC source is decreasing? And where do charges go? I mean if there's a weak battery, it will be charged but what ...
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2answers
32 views

If the potential drops across a resistor (=$V_d$) then shouldn't the potential difference be the $\epsilon-V_d$?

Consider the following circuit: Suppose a current $I$ travels in both the branches, then as the current $I$ passes through the $60$ ohm resistor, there will be a drop in the potential of $60I$. ...
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2answers
452 views

Potential Difference of a wire?

Imagine a circuit with only a 12 Volts battery and a wire connecting the ends of the battery. Point A and point B lies on the wire. What is then the potential difference between point A and B if the ...
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3answers
5k views

Resistor cube problem solving method

I was solving problems from Irodov when I came across the method called point of symmetry method. I cant find this method anywhere. So what is this method? Here is the link to the problem solution ...
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0answers
43 views

Load matching in a transmission line [closed]

Can somebody explain me easily and clearly why when you want to transform a 50 ohm load impedance through a piece of transmission line in an arbitrary one let's say $Z$ (complex number); that it's the ...
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0answers
16 views

Load matching in a transmission line [duplicate]

Can somebody explain me easily and clearly why when you want to transform a 50 ohm load impedance through a piece of transmission line in an arbitrary one let's say Z (complex number); that is exactly ...
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2answers
2k views

Why do voltmeters and ammeters have high and low resistance respectively?

I understand why voltmeters are connected in parallel and ammeters are connected in series, but why is it that to measure voltage, you must have high resistance, and to measure current, you must have ...
5
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1answer
231 views

Are magnetic hysteresis losses relevant to alternating currents flowing in a wire?

Say we have an AC in a magnetically lossy material, like iron. Because of iron's relatively high permeability, skin effect will be more pronounced than it is in say, copper, so this iron wire isn't so ...
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1answer
123 views

Back EMF & Current, how can we make the current $I$ stable?

Lets assume we have a wire that has $10V$ across and $1$ $Amp$ flowing, now if this conductor is introduced to a changing magnetic field, $-EMF$ is induced, can we control our voltage to increase it ...
2
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1answer
28 views

Inductor potential difference direction

If you have increasing current going down an inductor, the inductor will produce a potential difference to produce a counter current in the opposite direction, or up. The lower potential is then on ...
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0answers
27 views

Thevenin Theorem Proof

I do not understand some parts of Proof of Thevenin and Norton theorem. Why is a circuit of resistors and sources linear? Also, the load is a test current source, Is. Why does the theorem work for ...
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3answers
134 views

Why is the total potential difference in a circuit the sum of the individual potential differences?

I am having difficulty in applying my understanding of electrical potential to circuits. Why is the total potential difference in a circuit the sum of the individual potential differences among ...
1
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1answer
33 views

Kirchhoff's laws in phasor domain

While analysing AC circuits, we write voltage, current etc all with complex numbers namely "phasors". While studying the same, I wondered if Kirchhoff's laws held good with current and voltage in ...
3
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2answers
56 views

Is power still consumed when we switch off the lights?

I was having heated discussion with one of my friends. We were discussing Earth Hour and its role in saving electricity, and creating awareness. He stated that even if you turn off the lights, the ...
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2answers
3k views

Why does voltage change in series circuit but not in parallel circuit?

Voltage divides after every resistor in series but not when placed in parallel. Please explain this with using very less or no mathematical equations. I have tried searching for an answer online but ...
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0answers
41 views

Finding Inductance in an AC RLC Circuit?

In the laboratory you find an inductor of unknown inductance $L$ and unknown internal resistance $R$. Using a dc ohmmeter, an ac voltmeter of high impedance, a 1 microfarad capacitor, and a 1000 Hz ...
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1answer
47 views

What happens in the RC circuit when being charged?

Say I have this RC circuit and at the start, the switch is off (current going from left to right and the starting point is just above the battery). I understand that then the capacitor acts just ...
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1answer
216 views

Measured voltage on coil

I have a simple circuit of coil with inductance L $$u_c(t)= -L\frac{di}{dt}$$ and AC source with output voltage $u_s$ What is actually measured by the voltmeter ($u_c$, $u_s$ or $u_s - u_c$)? If ...
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4answers
225 views

Optimal method for solving circuit

This problem seems quite simple, and I can easily find a way to solve it but the possibility of error in my method is extremely high. This is just a sub-task of a bigger task but this is the only part ...
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0answers
17 views

With the help of a given charge is it possible to obtain a charge many times greater in magnitude

Consider a spherically conducting sphere. If a charge(say positive) is placed near the sphere, then it will lead to separation of charges inside the sphere.My question is, can we create charges more ...
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1answer
215 views

Calculation of RMS current in half wave rectifier

While calculating RMS current in half wave rectifier, why we will consider only half wave that means only we consider the limits 0 to pi. But here RMS current is for AC input..so why don't we consider ...
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3answers
153 views

How does voltage divided by EMF show efficiency?

I get that electromotoric force (emf) is energy per coulomb supplied and that voltage is energy per coulomb used but I don't get what it means when we say that the voltage divided by the emf gives the ...
-1
votes
2answers
42 views

Series circuit of capacitor and ohmic resistance: Voltage drop at Capacitor? [closed]

I have a question to an exercise I am currently trying to solve. It is given an Capacitor and an ohmic resistance in a series circuit. The whole voltage is 40V, the resistor has an resistance of ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

How to calculate the resistance of a resistors in a grid?

I've found a lot of example of a grid where you want to total resistance of a grid. My problem is different. Let's say you got a grid of resistance (3x3) but you only have the total resistance between ...
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0answers
15 views

Are there simple ways to describe circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors, and memristors? [migrated]

I am taking an introductory university physics course in electromagnetism, and we are currently going over RC, RL, and RLC circuits. Last semester in my computer architecture class, I did a paper on ...
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0answers
19 views

Short circuit and voltage source [migrated]

I don't understand why when you replace a wire between a and b with a short circuit, you could just ignore 160 Ix voltage source. I understand that those two resistors in parallel will be shorted, ...
0
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2answers
173 views

What's the max speed a man-made satellite can travel in space before its circuitry stopped working?

Assume it could withstand extreme temperatures in either direction. I'm mainly curious what would happen to its circuits as it approached the speed of light.
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0answers
14 views

Making a conductive paint out of graphite powder [closed]

I want to make a conductive paint out of graphite powder and gum to use as an electrode. What shall be the best gum to use, as i need a low resistance of around some kilo Ohms. I am getting very high ...
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3answers
54 views

Which makes for a better equivalent capacitor? In series or in parrallel?

I understand how capacitors in series and in parallel work. However, I am wondering if it makes a difference, in terms of making a better capacitor that can store more charge, would you connect them ...
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1answer
26 views

Imaginary component in capacitive reactance

This is a trivial question in first year but, unfortunately, this popped up in an elementary yet compulsory lab experiment. The capacitive reactance is defined as $$X_{c}=\frac{1}{\omega c}$$ The ...
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1answer
38 views

How can current remain same when potential difference decreases?

According to Ohm's law, $$\text{potential difference} = \text{resistance}\times\text{current}$$ Also, current remains the same everywhere. Now when current passes through a bulb, the electric ...