An electronic system, with closed loop current flow, and relative electrical potentials present across electrical components.

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Explanation of the Graetz circuit

My knowledge of circuits is pretty rudimentary and I've never really understood circuits, so I'm having trouble with the concept of Graetz circuits: When you register the voltage on the resistor R ...
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6k views

Effective resistance of inductor

In a lab experiment, we connected a simple circuit: an AC voltage source, connected (in series) to a variable resistor and an inductor. We measured the current in the circuit, and the voltage that ...
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59 views

If current takes the path of least resistance, why do parallel circuits work? [duplicate]

Why doesn't all the current flow down the path with the weaker resistance instead of dividing and going through both resistors (in a parallel setup with 2 unequal resistors)?
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331 views

Why do high voltage transmission line workers need a Faraday cage suit?

In this video the high voltage transmission line workers are wearing a Faraday cage suit. Why is this needed? Without the Faraday cage, the resistance of the human would be very high compared to the ...
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183 views

Does an Inductor maintain it's energy?

Consider a simple LCR ac circuit; generally I (might) understand that the charge exchange between capacitor and inductor would induce a harmonic current flow, but I remain confused for two reasons: ...
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350 views

Why is there no induced electric field in the experiment (Faraday's Law)

Below are three circuit diagrams for each of Faraday's experiments that allowed Faraday to come up with Faraday's Law. In Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics Griffiths states (on page 302 of ...
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379 views

Resonance Frequency of High Resistance RLC

I was measuring the resonance frequency of an RLC (all in series) circuit using an oscilloscope and a function generator. Now resonance frequency is given by: $$f_r = \frac{1}{2 \pi \sqrt{LC}}$$ In ...
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795 views

$Q$ factor of parallel RLC circuit in series with a capacitor and resistor

I know that for parallel RLC circuits, the $Q$ factor is given by: $$ Q = R \sqrt {\frac{C}{L}} $$ But now suppose it is connected in series to a resistor $R_2$ and capacitor $C_2$. Would the $Q$ ...
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227 views

RLC circuit, turning off the voltage source

An RLC circuit (pictured above) is governed by two equations: \begin{align} -iR &= -L \frac{dj}{dt} = \frac{q}{C}+V(t) \\ \frac{dq}{dt} &= i+j \, . \end{align} $q$ satisfies the equation ...
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3k views

Delta to Star/Y Conversions and vice versa in Electric Ciruits

We all know the basic rules for conversion of $"Delta"$ circuits to $"Star"$ circuits and vice versa. We also know that this is needed for simplification of circuits in complex cases. Can anyone ...
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786 views

What is the current through the lamp?

We have the following circuit: A neon lamp and a inductor are connected in parallel to a battery of 1.5 $V$. The inductor has a 1000 loops, a length of $5.0 cm$, an area of $12cm^2$ and a ...
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2answers
567 views

Instantaneous current after battery unplugged in RL circuit?

I've been racking my brain over this, and I can't find any clues in my textbook as to how to approach it. I have the following circuit: My goal is to find R such that, right after the switch is ...
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661 views

Compute closed line integral of electric field in circuit

I have a circuit where resistor is parallel to capacitor, which is charged with voltage U. How to compute line integral around closed loop to get the result of Kirchhof second law - ...
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705 views

Electrostatic notion of voltage as it applies to circuits

I have a question that's been bothering me about electric fields, voltage, and circuit analysis. Initially, I came to understand voltage as it was taught in the context of electrostatics - through ...
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285 views

How are quantum potential wells fabricated?

Potential wells, such as infinite and finite potential well, have been the standard examples in quantum mechanics textbooks for tens of years. They started being only theoretical toy models but as ...
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51 views

Can a magnetic lock be negated or overcome by a stronger electro magnet? [closed]

Magnetic locks seem to be fairly standard on modern buildings. Is it, though, possible to negate a magnetic lock my placing an oppositely-polarized, strong electromagnet across from the magnets on the ...
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1answer
34 views

Tesla Coil stops sparking until restart [closed]

I have a tesla coil with NT-1530-OUT Transformer, 23 turns (max) primary, 1m secondary(~1600turns), with MMC and rotary sparkgap. Gets 50cm sparks but try to tune the tesla coil by shifting top ...
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Is voltage difference always proportional to its derivative?

We write, because of Ohm's law: $$V=RI(t),$$ but also we have $$C\frac{dV}{dt}=I(t).$$ From the first equation we deduce that $V\propto I$ and from the second $\dot V\propto I$. So we can conclude ...
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510 views

Olympiad physics 1996 problem [closed]

I don't understand the official solution of the first problem of the 1996 International Physics Olympiad. They give this circuit: Each black box is a resistor of resistance $1\Omega$. They then ...
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4answers
403 views

Justification of root mean square [duplicate]

In the top answer to the question Why do we use Root Mean Square (RMS) values when talking about AC voltage, the following was stated: This RMS is a mathematical quantity (used in many math ...
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3answers
812 views

Is there inductance to a DC circuit?

When a DC circuit is carrying current, large amounts or small, is there induced-emf due to the inductance? Or is it only applied to AC circuits?
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3k views

Current Through a Circuit with an 8 Resistor Setup

The following is a question from a practice Physics GRE exam (found online at ETS's website). The circuit shown in the figure consists of eight resistors, each with resistance R, and a battery ...
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421 views

Is equivalent resistance always lower if we add a resistor to a passive electronic circuit?

How to prove that equivalent resistance of any passive network is always lower if we add a resistor between arbitrary two nodes? Note that this is not necessarily a parallel circuit, 2 nodes that we ...
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90 views

Why is an $LC$ oscillator lossless, but $C V^2 / 2$ energy is lost to a capacitor connected to an ideal voltage source?

It is mathematically proven that in an $LC$ oscillation that all the energy gets transferred from the inductor to the capacitor and vice versa. There is no energy loss as there is no load in the ...
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Why is equivalent resistance in parallel circuit always less than each individual resistor?

There are $n$ resistors connected in a parallel combination given below. $$\frac{1}{R_{ev}}=\frac{1}{R_{1}}+\frac{1}{R_{2}}+\frac{1}{R_{3}}+\frac{1}{R_{4}}+\frac{1}{R_{5}}.......\frac{1}{R_{n}}$$ ...
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Current from induced emf

If the induced emf in a circuit is negative, and current from this emf is the emf over the resistance, what happens to the negative sign in the induced emf when solving for the current? Surely there's ...
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6k views

Questions about voltage

For some reason, I feel like the concept of voltage is escaping my grasp. I've done much research on these forums and through texts, and come across answers that seem quite well thought out, but still ...
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Can Kirchhoff laws be applied to any circuit?

Kirchhoff's loop/current rule is just law of conservation of energy and Kirchhoff's junction rule is just law of conservation of charge.So, I think that these can be applied to any circuits unlike ...
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16k views

Why do current-carrying wires heat up?

Obviously wires heat up too, but why do they heat up? And for the same reason, why do we get electrical burns?
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5answers
1k views

Current division in ideal inductors?

The Question is:- Find the current distribution in the inductors at steady state (i.e. assuming $t\rightarrow \infty$ after the switch is closed and circuit established and consider the ...
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541 views

Potential difference with an inductor

As far as I know, the potential difference between two points is defined as the negative line integral of electric field between those 2 points: $$\Delta V=-\int d \ell\cdot\mathbf E$$ I also know ...
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4answers
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Capacitor Charging and Discharging when connected to the ground

When we charge a capacitor using a battery and then remove the battery, the plates of capacitor becomes charged. One holds positive charge and the other one gets equal negative charge. o. k. ? Now ...
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229 views

Are there general circuits that differentiate/integrate empirically?

Is it possible to construct simple circuits, that given a time-varying input, produce an output that represents the derivative or integral of the input with respect to time?
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An Ideal Transformer

In a transformer assumed to be transformer, power in the primary is equal to power in the secondary. So in a sense, the power in the secondary is 'fixed'. Output voltage in the secondary is also fixed ...
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7k views

Wheatstone Bridge

Why is using a Wheatstone bridge such an accurate way of calculating an unknown resistance? What are the benefits of using it over Ohm's law? It seems that it has something to do with the wires ...
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34 views

Electrical injuries - Doorknob vs powerline

This is something that has bothered me since high school physics. I have a medical and engineering degree, yet I can't for my life answer this question in a way that's logically consistent in my ...
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130 views

Is a Thomson's lamp physically realistic? [closed]

The Thomson's lamp is a philosophical puzzle that can be describe as follows: Consider a lamp with a toggle switch. Flicking the switch once turns the lamp on. Another flick will turn the lamp off. ...
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Why does a fluorescent tube-lamp flicker before lighting up?

If you turn on a fluorescent tube-lamp, it flickers before lighting up. If you then turn it off and turn it back on after 2 seconds, this time it doesn't flicker but lights up straight away. If you ...
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414 views

Why do electrons drift in an ideal conductor, since there's no field?

Suppose a simple circuit with a DC voltage source and a resistor. The voltage of the source will be situated over the resistor. So the electric field (which is the gradient of the potential) will be ...
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Current in series resistors and voltage drop in parallel resistors

When we have resistors in series, the current through all the resistors is same and the voltage drop (or simply voltage) at each resistor is different. Question 1: It is fine that voltage drop ...
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14k views

Finding current using EMF & internal resistance

What exactly is the difference between internal resistance and resistance? This came up in the context of a homework problem I have been given: The circuit shown in the figure contains two ...
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2k views

How does energy depend on frequency in an alternating current circuit?

In what relation is the energy input in an alternating current circuit to its frequency? I'd guess I have to compute something like $$E=\int P(\omega,t) dt=\int U(\omega,t) I(\omega,t) dt, $$ but ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the potential difference between point X and point Y?

Here is the problem: In the above figure I want help on finding the potential difference between X and Y. It is getting quite confusing due to the battery in the middle. I found the current in both ...
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78 views

What changes in the electrons before and after a voltage drop?

It is easy to visualize gravitational potential energy as a function of the position of height, and a change in this potential is manifested in a change in height. Further, by the work-energy theorem ...
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Why does voltage change in series circuit but not in parallel circuit?

Voltage divides after every resistor in series but not when placed in parallel. Please explain this with using very less or no mathematical equations. I have tried searching for an answer online but ...
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45 views

Current - Voltage curve for non-ohmic material

Forgive me for I am a math student and am quite ignorant in these topics. I would like to know, at least implicitly, how the current intensity of a lightbulb, for example, relates to the potential ...
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1answer
149 views

Circuit analysis (Kirchoff's laws) for multi terminal resistors

Consider a four terminal resistor as shown here There exists a matrix resistance equation of the form $V_i=R_{ij}I_j$ for some $4\times 4$ matrix $R$ for each such four terminal resistor. I want to ...
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94 views

Why doesn't the potential drop as a $E=\nabla V$ inside a circuit when there is no resistor?

Considering that an electric field exists outside a battery and inside a circuit, shouldn't the potential drop while we move along the wire even if there is no resistor ($E=\nabla V$)? I am asking ...
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107 views

Why is $R_2$ and $ R_3$ parallel with $R_1$ in this circuit?

I know that if $V_2$ wasn't there it would make sense if $R_2$ and $R_3$ were parallel with each other and in series with $R_1$. Why is it different in this case?
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Resistor and LED - together and separated

Something very basic which I don't get no matter how much I read. circuit A: only a resistor and power supply - the resistor will burn. circuit B: only a LED and power supply - the LED will damaged. ...