An electronic system, with closed loop current flow, and relative electrical potentials present across electrical components.

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What is the current of a capacitor when the derivative of voltage is undefined?

This is from the textbook I am reading: I know this equation for capacitors: $$i=C\cdot \frac { dv }{ dt }$$ Here is my question: how can diagram (a) be allowed if the derivative of the voltage ...
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Why do electric motors draw current even when they are not moving?

After testing electric motors, I realized that these motors draw current even when they are not moving. I do feel that these motors are trying to move, but they are not really moving, in the end. ...
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Why do two connected 1.5-volt batteries become a 3- volt battery?

Why two connected 1.5 volt battery become 3 volts? If one battery plus side is connect to minus side of another battery, there should be a current flow between them until no free charge move anymore, ...
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Why does breaking one bulb on a string of Christmas Lights cause all the rest to break in some lights?

If I break one bulb on a string of Christmas lights, or the filament goes out, then all of the rest seem to stop working. Why is this? However, I've also seen the opposite happen in some newer ...
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How long would it take for electricity to flow from one terminal to other, via a 1 LY long wire?

Basically, how long does it take for electricity to determine there is a closed circuit and how does it know that the circuit exists? I'm curious to know how it knows there is a closed circuit at any ...
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204 views

$V=IR$, isn't it missing something?

So I know that $V=IR$ works for circuits, but for the case of an arc-before the arc jumps, there is a potential difference, but no current, but there isn't infinite resistance is there? I don't ...
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How electric currents can flow between 2 points at the same potential?

According to Ohm's law, if there is a potential difference, $V$, across a resistor then there is a current, $I$, flowing through it. Since we assume that points along the connecting wire are at the ...
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Potential difference (PD) and electromotive force (EMF) in terms of electrons?

I am trying to understand potential difference and electromotive force in terms of electrons. In the above 3 circuit diagrams the red shows (what I think to be) the distribution of electrons around ...
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Will I get a shock when I try to use my hair-dryer under water?

Occasionally people get killed in their bathtubs by having an electrical device such as a hair-dryer take the bath with them - in movies. It seems to be a common belief that this is realistic, even ...
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Lots of little questions about radiation of LC circuits

I'm trying to get a more intuitive understanding of resonant inductive coupling. It's supposed be a more efficient way to transfer electrical energy wirelessly, because the coils are only coupled by ...
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Weird phenomenon on aluminum laptop casing [duplicate]

A couple of days ago I observed a phenomenon which I'm not sure I understand correctly. My brother-in-law has recently bought an ASUS gaming laptop in an aluminum casing. When the power supply is ...
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Why can't a superconductor make a DC motor self sustaining?

Superconducting wire can host a low current magnetic field. I do not know if it supports a corresponding electrical field. Can a superconducting wire that sustains a current accelerate a DC motor? ...
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Detecting if resistances are parallel or series in complex circuits

I know how to detect when resistors are arranged in parallel or series arrangement and I can also find their equivalent resistance in simple circuits or when resistances are connected in form of ...
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5answers
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How does insulating footwear prevent an electric shock?

The reason I have always heard to explain the reduction of electric shock when we wear insulating footwear goes as follows: When electricity passes from our body to the ground, an electric circuit ...
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Why does connecting a battery's positive terminal to the negative terminal of another battery not create a short circuit?

This is a question regarding the physics behind the observation. I have guessed the answer to the question, but I may be wrong, so I want to wait for the responses before posting it. Some major ...
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6answers
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Intuitively, Why is Power Proportional to $I^2R$

As the resistance of a circuit goes down, the power increases because the current increases, assuming constant voltage. Why is this? I feel like resistance and current are inversely proportional, so ...
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3answers
856 views

How is Kirchhoff's voltage law understood in the water flow analogy?

I met the Kirchhoff circuit laws in the past, but now I'm trying to associate them with a practical representation to be sure to understand them. Let's start with the Kirchhoff current law: If I say ...
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Equivalent resistance in ladder circuit [closed]

I have stumbled upon a given question I really have a hard time to solve. Basically I need to find an equivalent resistance in some form of "ladder" configuration. Where the chain is an infinite ...
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4answers
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Is it possible to flow current in open circuit?

As I know a battery is an example of a closed circuit where it can then produce electricity , electrons will flow from negative pole to positive. A chemistry representation of this battery is for ...
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If a superconductor has zero resistance, does it have infinite amperage?

If amps = volts / ohms, and ohms is 0, then what is x volts / 0 ohms?
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1answer
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short circuit an alkaline battery

i'm not doing anything related to physics, but i'm just curious : What really happen when i short circuit an alkaline battery ? some article in the net shown that fire/explosion can be happened when ...
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4answers
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How can there be a current and an electric field in an idealized wire with no voltage drop?

In an ideal circuit, How can there be a current b/w points a & b, when there is no potential difference and thus no electric field between a & b? If there is no current, then where does ...
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Why does a capacitor discharge?

Suppose a charged capacitor (parallel plates), the negative and positive charges on two plates attract each other. Which force cause the negative charge carriers (electrons) move through the circuit ...
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Capacitor circuits with light bulb

Let's say we have a normal circuit with a light bulb, with wires and a battery. When one places a capacitor in this circuit, how is the light bulb able to light up, even when the capacitor prevents ...
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What are the effects of cosmic rays on consumer electronics? [closed]

When electronics/computer companies design a new chip, processor/ memory card/ or a solar cell, do they study the effect of cosmic rays on such electronically sensitive materials? If not, why not?
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How electron movement produces current,instead of having a slow drift speed

Just need a clarification here, how the current is produced due to the movement of electrons, in an external circuit,having a very slow drift speed. Normally in a battery there is high potential ...
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1answer
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Sign conventions for voltage drop and gain in circuit

In Sears and Zemansky's University Physics book and in many other books in English they define the following sign conventions (used for Kirchhoff loop rule for example): While in many other books (...
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Does current flow back to the source through earth?

We know that if Single Line to Fault occurs, then fault current flows to the earth. I want to know whether the current will return to the source or not. For the current to flow we need a closed path. ...
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2answers
349 views

Modeling stochastic process with frequency-dependent power spectrum

I'm trying to model of Johnson-Nyquist noise propagation in a nonlinear circuit. An ideal (linear) resistor can be modeled very nicely by the Fokker-Planck equation (equivalently, the drift-diffusion ...
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2answers
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How can a circuit function with two negative battery terminals facing each other?

Here is a drawing of the circuit that is confusing me: I don't quite understand how batteries work in this diagram. If a battery has a negative and positive terminal, there must be a barrier ...
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1answer
129 views

Analogy in combination of batteries in series and pn junction diode circuit to find potential difference

Can I use the analogy of combination of two batteries to get the potential difference between two points(by applying Kirchhoff's law) in case ,if a pn junction diode is used in the place of other ...
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1answer
169 views

Does the skin effect, eddy current / hysteresis losses contribute to Johnson noise in an inductor?

Based on my very basic understanding of the Johnson noise, it's not just a DC phenomena, but should change with frequency in a system, where there is a frequency dependent, real component to the ...
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1answer
138 views

How uniquely determined is the impedance of an infinite-chain circuit?

A recent question asked how to find the impedance of an infinite chain of series-plus-parallel circuits. The standard trick is to split the chain after the first link, and treat the tail of the ...
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261 views

What is the area in Faraday's law if we have only a piece of metal moving in a magnetic field?

If a piece of metal of length $l$ is moving with a speed $v$ in a region where there is a uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it, there will be a potential difference across its terminals ...
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5answers
174 views

Why aren't resistors equivalent to breaks when $R\to\infty$?

Find the voltage across each resistor as $R\to\infty$ Kirchoff's voltage law gives $$10\ \mathrm{V} - V_R-V_R = 0 \implies V_R = 5\ \mathrm{V}$$ However, don't we get two holes in the ...
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Why do Capacitor Inductor circuits Oscillate instead of reaching equilibrium?

When the capacitor is fully charged there is a potential difference between its poles and that creates a current. This current would create a magnetic field that is changing in the Inductor (because ...
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Do the copper connectors we used in measuring the resistance of a wire contribute to the said measurement?

We measured the resistance of a wire by setting the multimeter to ohmmeter mode and connected the ends of the ohmmeter to the ends of the wire; and we also calculated the theoretical value using a ...
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The electric field in wires in a circuit

I have a hard time really understanding the electric field in a complete curcuit. How is the electric field maintained throughout the wiring / the conductors from component to component? The charges ...
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2answers
251 views

Voltage in a circuit

Suppose I have a following circuit: I do not understand, why the potential difference between the points $c$ and $d$ is equal to the potential difference between the points $b$ and $a$? That is, ...
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General integral to find resistance

My question is: is there a simple and truly general equation for the resistance between two electrical equipotential surfaces?. Obviously, if so, what is it, and if not, why? It would be very ...
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80 views

Current in inductor just after switch is closed

I have read that the current in an inductor resistor circuit just after closing the switch is zero. This is derived by finding the differential equation in terms of current by using KVL. Is this true ...
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2answers
194 views

Will the two capacitors be charged in this circuit?

Is such a circuit possible to exist with the two capacitors charging? Because if we considered the outer loop using Kirchhoff's law we get: ℰ = q1/C1 + q2/C2 But since the two capacitors are ...
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4answers
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Physical meaning of Impedance

So I have been thinking about the way impedance is defined for electrical systems, and the way it is derived. Even after looking through some websites, I cannot seem to grasp something, which every ...
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2answers
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Why is the voltage drop across an ideal wire zero?

I'm having trouble conceptualizing why the voltage drop between two points of an ideal wire (i.e. no resistance) is $0~V$. Using Ohm's Law, the equation is such: $$ V = IR \\ V = I(0~\Omega) \\ V = 0$...
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3answers
166 views

Why do electric pickles only glow at one end?

The electric pickle is often used as an example of a non-ohmic resistor. In the experiment, electric current excites the sodium ions inside pickle, producing very bright and intense light effect. What ...
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7answers
61k views

Why the bulb glows brighter?

If the total current is divided into the branches in a parallel configuration and it is constant in series. How come the bulbs glow brighter when connected in parallel than when connected in series?
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2answers
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Voltage drop due to a resistor

I'm afraid this question is going to sound rather dumb but here it is: Suppose I have a very simple circuit: one battery and one resistor. The sum of the voltages in this circuit has to equal zero. ...
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What creates voltage? What causes electrons to move in a wire?

I was trying to break down how a transistor works to a friend, and I took a moment to think about electric current and voltages. I realised I do not understand where these phenomena come from. I ...
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Derivation of Ohm's Law

Is it possible to derive Ohm's law (perhaps in some appropriate limit) from Maxwell's Equations?
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Reducing Eddy current losses

Eddy currents are setup in any metallic block which is in the vicinity of changing magnetic fluxes. These primarily cause heat losses, and in certain cases causes damping of the relative motion ...