An electronic system, with closed loop current flow, and relative electrical potentials present across electrical components.

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insufficient electrons in a conductor [duplicate]

We all know that if an electric field is applied across an isolated conductor, then charges are induced at either surface such that the net electric field inside becomes zero. Now if the applied ...
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0answers
12 views

Origin of Overpotential in Electrochemical Cell

I'm well aware of the significance of overpotential and how it is defined to be the difference between the thermodynamically determined equilibrium potential and the experimental potential required to ...
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4answers
2k views

Finding equivalent resistance in complex circuit

In my previous Phys.SE question, situated here, I asked about finding the equivalent resistance of the following circuit : I got some very good answers and some tips. Now what if the same circuit is ...
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2answers
125 views

Dimension of the space of solutions in an electric circuit

Consider an electric circuit with dc sources ( voltage and current) and resistors. Write down the equations. In the most general case, the solution of the system is not unique. The set of solutions ...
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21 views

Replacing diode in circuit analysis?

While analyzing circuits containing diodes in reverse bias I replace it with a pure insulator for simplifying things. Similarly can I replace a forward biased diode with a conductor and a varying ...
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3answers
231 views

Why are exothermic reactions easier than endothermic?

If we talk about electric heating then we have simple elements in which we apply electrical energy which gets converted into the kinetic energy of the electrons which heats it up. But while cooling, ...
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1answer
54 views

The effects of reversing the leads of an ammeter

I was playing around with a battery, an ammeter, and a light bulb. The ammeter originally read 1.99 A, but after reversing the leads going into and out of the ammeter the ammeter read -1.98A. I know ...
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0answers
51 views

Circuit analysis, calculating voltage across resistor [duplicate]

i'm solved this question, I'm sure that solution is right, but my instructor says that V1=116V, and also he said that he will not show how he get this result.Please help to identify who is right.
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3answers
411 views

Why does a fluorescent tube-lamp flicker before lighting up?

If you turn on a fluorescent tube-lamp, it flickers before lighting up. If you then turn it off and turn it back on after 2 seconds, this time it doesn't flicker but lights up straight away. If you ...
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3answers
82 views

Capacitance: How to increase total charge drawn from a battery?

I can't seem to find any information about how parallel capacitors or capacitors in a series affect how much a capacitor can charge, not in my textbook or online. Here is the question I am trying to ...
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2answers
382 views

What do we mean exactly by the positive/negative charges in cathode and anode?

In batteries, what exactly do we mean by negative and positive charges? My understanding is that the negative charge of the anode is basically an atom with an extra electron in the last orbital and a ...
22
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4answers
3k views

Why do 'dead' batteries work again after exchanging the places of the batteries in an electronic device?

My camera, which is powered by two AA batteries in series, would not power on. I removed the batteries, exchanged their locations, and the device worked again - for another 15 minutes or so. The ...
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1answer
44 views

How do you calculate the energy output if you know the volts, amps and time? [closed]

How do you calculate the energy output if you know the volts, amps and time?
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1answer
543 views

How does mass relate to resistance (Ohm's Law)

How can I relate $mg$ to $R$? Just to give you a scenario: If a free hanging weight was tied to a motor... I know the voltage ($V$) and current ($I$) so I can use $V = IR$ to find $R$. What if I ...
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2answers
433 views

What is the physical interpretation of the Fourier transform $(\mathcal{F}Z)(t)$ an impedance?

If I compose a impedances out of smaller ones in series and parallel configurations, e.g. $$Z(\omega)=i\omega L_2+\tfrac{1}{\tfrac{1}{R_1}\ +\ i\omega C_1+\ \tfrac{1}{i\omega L_2}},$$ then I get a ...
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1answer
63 views

Why are diodes able to amplify signals in groups, but not alone?

Single diodes can determine whether a signal passes or not (depending on the biased)(plus they can even rectify a signal), yet why does it take a combination of diodes(like a transistor) to amplify a ...
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4answers
193 views

Is voltage important when creating a magnetic field?

Would a DC circuit that has a high current and low voltage have a powerful magnetic field? I'm trying to create a powerful solenoid. In order to create a powerful magnetic field, I'm focusing more on ...
4
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1answer
49 views

Why is Kirchoff's Current Rule valid?

The fact that Kirchoff's Current Rule is valid means that whatever current flows in flows out. But this will only be valid for a steady current circuit, that is, when there is no accumulation of ...
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0answers
41 views

Questions (intuitive) about circuits and the flow of electrons

Why don't electrons accelerate in a circuit? If there is a potential difference and the electron moves in the circuit a force is exerted on it. Why does that force produce no acceleration, keeping the ...
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2answers
148 views

What does E/M field look like when I close a circuit?

Suppose that we have a charged capacitor with two pins: $ C_+ $ and $C_-$. Suppose that we have a long wire with fixed geometry, that is already connected to the pin C+. Let the ...
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5answers
1k views

Does current flow back to the source through earth?

We know that if Single Line to Fault occurs, then fault current flows to the earth. I want to know whether the current will return to the source or not. For the current to flow we need a closed path. ...
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4answers
3k views

Detecting if resistances are parallel or series in complex circuits

I know how to detect when resistors are arranged in parallel or series arrangement and I can also find their equivalent resistance in simple circuits or when resistances are connected in form of ...
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1answer
38 views

How to calculate a charge of capacitors on a circuit (both paraller and serial)

I have a circuit with capacitors on it: I am trying to figure out the charge on each capacitor. The following is given: i know that parallel capacitors follow the equation and that ...
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3answers
4k views

Why do current-carrying wires heat up?

Obviously wires heat up too, but why do they heat up? And for the same reason, why do we get electrical burns?
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5answers
314 views

What is Electromotive force (EMF)? How is it related to potential difference?

What is Electromotive force (EMF)? How is it related to potential difference? Is it the creation of potential difference in any conductor??Is it a process?Why is it called force? Does writing emf ...
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0answers
56 views

Voltage in a lossless transmission line

I have a question where I'm deriving expressions for different variables within a lossless transmission line. Here's the question as posed: Consider a lossless transmission line of characteristic ...
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1answer
38 views

Calculating current in parallel [closed]

Hypothetically, I have a circuit with a two $10\Omega$ resistors in parallel. I supply them say, $2V$. How do I calculate the current? What if, say, the circuit now has a $10\Omega$ resistor and a ...
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1answer
54 views

Ohms law and multiple resistors

In my physics class, we did an experiment in which we supported Ohm's law. We used a simple circuit that includes one resistor. The relationship of I = VR, and variants thereof, became apparent. We ...
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3answers
51 views

Resistor and LED - together and separated

Something very basic which I don't get no matter how much I read. circuit A: only a resistor and power supply - the resistor will burn. circuit B: only a LED and power supply - the LED will damaged. ...
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3answers
97 views

Physical question on an RLC circuit

I do not know if this is an appropriate place to ask this question here but this is the only website that I am a member of so I hope that it is okay. If not, I can delete it. This circuit question ...
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1answer
119 views

How to calibrate an Ammeter?

Calibrating an ammeter is tricky thing to do. The obvious way would be connecting it to another good ammeter and see if they get the same result. However, people have been telling you can use a ...
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1answer
2k views

Relationship between resistance and voltage drop

In a series or parallel circuit, if two bulbs have the same resistance, do they have the same voltage drops? The problem I am asking about is below. Do A, B, and C have the same voltage drops since ...
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1answer
194 views

Electric circuit. Slight problem with the sign on voltages

Translation first! The figure shows an electric circuit. a) Use Kirchhoffs 2.law on the part-circuit abed and show that $I_3$ = 0,50A. b) Explain that $I_2 + I_5 = 2,0A$. Use Kirchhoffs 2.law on the ...
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2answers
87 views

What exactly is ''electric energy''?

If the two fundamental types of energy are kinetic and potential energy, is electric energy simply the kinetic energy of charge carriers? Also, is the statement "A cell converts chemical potential ...
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48 views

Back $emf$ and power?

The formula relating current to back emf is $V-E=IR$ where $V$ is the source pd and $E$ is the back Emf. Thus it can be seen that as the back emf increases the current decreases. But what is the ...
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1answer
33 views

High Current at first and then steady from a battery

I just came up with a question, When a battery is connected to a circuit, the current first suddenly peaks up and slowly goes down to a steady value. Why is it so? I have not actually observed this, ...
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2answers
57 views

Resistances connected in series

When resistances connected in series then why through each resistances the different potential difference occurs?
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2answers
201 views

Proof of Thevenin and Norton theorem

How can I prove Thevenin's and Norton's theorem? Thévenin's theorem can be used to convert any circuit's sources and impedances to a Thévenin equivalent.
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How to apply faraday's law to lc circiut

I am having problem on using Faraday's law correctly. When I try to apply Faraday's law to the LC circuit: Assume the top plate of capacitor is positively charged and bottom is negative. So no ...
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1answer
52 views

Calculating decibel gain and loss

I'm doing a mobile/wireless networking subject and the physics aspect is giving me some trouble. I'm mainly confused about the conversion of dB, dBm and dBW and how to calculate the gain/loss from an ...
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1answer
48 views

Do I understand impedance correctly?

$$Let\quad \vec { Z } =R+Xj$$ If $X>0$,then the impedance is lagging (current lags behind voltage).If $X<0$, then the impedance is leading (current leads voltage or more accurately, voltage lags ...
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1answer
46 views

Energy conservation when capacitor charges in a zero resistance circuit

We know that when a capacitor charges from a source $E$, it stores energy of $E=\frac{1}{2}QV $. This is derived without taking into consideration any resistances present in the circuit. We also ...
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4answers
122 views

What happens in a circuit, when the wire and the battery are superconducting. And shorted

When a wire with no resistance is connected to the terminals of an ideal battery, will a current exist in the circuit? If a capacitor is added to the circuit, will it be charged by the battery or will ...
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4answers
1k views

What's the physical meaning of the imaginary component of impedance?

As you know, impedance is defined as a complex number. Ideal capacitors: $$ \frac {1} {j \omega C} \hspace{0.5 pc} \mathrm{or} \hspace{0.5 pc} \frac {1} {sC} $$ Ideal inductors: $$ j \omega L ...
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0answers
49 views

Power wasted and power delivered?

If a power source is supplying a current I and a voltage V, that travels to its destination through resistors of restance R is the power delivered at the destination = $VI - RI^2$, where $(Pi=) VI$ is ...
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1answer
74 views

How can current be a smooth curve?

The following is a graph of the current across some circuit element: Note how the current is treated like a smooth continuous function. Even in the analysis of things (i.e. analysis of the ...
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2answers
83 views

How to model “Doppler Distortion” of speakers?

Simple Model w/o Doppler I have a speaker driven by an electrical signal. The pressure at the sampling point is some linear operator acting on the input signal: $L[ s(t)]$. Where $L$ combines the ...
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1answer
50 views

Circuits and Power

"The diagram below represents a simple circuit composed of 5 identical light bulbs and 2 flashlight batteries. Which bulb (or bulbs) would you expect to be the brightest? a) V only b) V and W ...
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1answer
108 views

Batteries and fields?

Batteries generate fields in wires that essentially cause the movement of electrons. I think of batteries as two charged plates that essentially contain a mechanism between them to move electrons from ...
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1answer
47 views

Sign convention for EMF

When we define the field generate by EMF, why there is not negative sign in $\mathcal{E} = \oint \vec{E} \cdot d\vec{l}$? Usually we talk about potential, there should be a negative sign, right?