3
votes
2answers
97 views

Why does smashing a TV remote load its batteries?

Many times I had the same problem: my TV remote's batteries were too weak for it to operate, but then, when I shook the remote a bit and smashed it on my palm, somehow the remote regained its ability. ...
0
votes
0answers
64 views

Why isn't resistance proportional to distance squared

Here we have a wire. At both ends there is an equal and opposite field caused by a chemical reaction. So, if we decrease or increase the distance between the two points, the strength of the field ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Can we pass electricity through air?

Electricity: I was wondering, whether we can pass electricity through air over a distance of 100 meters or so as electricity means the flow of electrons and we have seen the discharge or movement of ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

How does AC current flow in an open circuit?

In common house hold wiring we have the hot lead, neutral and ground. If the hot lead in electrical wiring contacts earth ground (perhaps though a short circuit in the chassis of a device) then the ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Simple Parallel Electric Circuit [closed]

Ammeter (A1) and voltmeter (V) in series have parallel connection to another ammeter (A2). Currents in A1 and A2 are respectively 0.2 and 1.7 amp. Voltmeter's voltage is 6 volts. How should I find ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Why is parasitic capacitance in inductor said to be in parallel?

Internal resistance of inductance (or other devices) are said to be in series. But parasitic capacitance is said to be in parallel (in case of an inductor). Why is that so? What determines whether an ...
0
votes
3answers
73 views

Could this open electric circuit work?

Two batteries are interfaced by a resistor. Parameters such as resistance can be set arbitrarily. Does it work?
0
votes
1answer
16 views

How to measure area under the waveform (electric current)?

I have a current waveform from my circuit which goes up and down the x-axis. x-axis represents time and my y axis represents current. How should I calculate total area under the curve? Should I take ...
2
votes
2answers
36 views

electric-circuits

Why can't you connect the + of a device to one battery and the - to another battery (and have it work)?
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Electricity voltage & current [closed]

Why does current return to its source?
0
votes
0answers
19 views

insufficient electrons in a conductor [duplicate]

We all know that if an electric field is applied across an isolated conductor, then charges are induced at either surface such that the net electric field inside becomes zero. Now if the applied ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Understanding frequency of a signal

I'm trying to understand how can one transmit different signals on a same copper wire using different frequencies. How does the electrons actually interact with the frequency? And how does the ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Origin of Overpotential in Electrochemical Cell

I'm well aware of the significance of overpotential and how it is defined to be the difference between the thermodynamically determined equilibrium potential and the experimental potential required to ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Why are diodes able to amplify signals in groups, but not alone?

Single diodes can determine whether a signal passes or not (depending on the biased)(plus they can even rectify a signal), yet why does it take a combination of diodes(like a transistor) to amplify a ...
0
votes
2answers
76 views

Why is emf equal to PD when circuit is “open”?

I understand that the set up of a battery consists of very good, but not ideal conductor, and therefore, some internal resistance exists. Also, I get that emf is the PD that would exist if the ...
4
votes
2answers
87 views

What exactly is ''electric energy''?

If the two fundamental types of energy are kinetic and potential energy, is electric energy simply the kinetic energy of charge carriers? Also, is the statement "A cell converts chemical potential ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

Back $emf$ and power?

The formula relating current to back emf is $V-E=IR$ where $V$ is the source pd and $E$ is the back Emf. Thus it can be seen that as the back emf increases the current decreases. But what is the ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Power wasted and power delivered?

If a power source is supplying a current I and a voltage V, that travels to its destination through resistors of restance R is the power delivered at the destination = $VI - RI^2$, where $(Pi=) VI$ is ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Circuits and Power

"The diagram below represents a simple circuit composed of 5 identical light bulbs and 2 flashlight batteries. Which bulb (or bulbs) would you expect to be the brightest? a) V only b) V and W ...
1
vote
3answers
112 views

How “earthing” electricity work?

I made a simple bulb-battery circuit and then I cut one of the wires and attached both ends to cemented floor, the bulb didn't glow, this means cemented floor is a ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

Finding the voltage of an inductor in a RL series circuit [closed]

Here is the solution: This assigned question is an odd one since it doesn't seem to have anything to do with phasors which is the chapter I am currently studying. I know that that the phase ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Circuit analysis: Two nodes as one?

Can I treat these two nodes in the center as if there were only one node connecting these four components?
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Does back emf occur in transformers?

Does back emf occur in transformers and if so does it reduce the efficiency of the transformer and can it be reduced?
1
vote
0answers
29 views

How do the different types of energy apply to voltage in a circuit

I was just wondering what happens in a circuit in terms of different types of energy transformations. If you apply a voltage to a circuit then electrons start moving (very slowly). Since the electrons ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

The shape of the graph of the equation: $V= -r I + E$

I have recently collected data (for a school experiment) in order to measure the EMF and the internal resistance of a solar cell. The data complied with the equation: $V = -rI + E$, i.e. the voltage ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

The value of current and voltage in a circuit

The picture is just for example. I don't know why $i$ and $i_1$ have different directions and $i+i_1=0$ according to KCL. Also, the value of voltage at each element. I mean in why the $V$ of the end ...
0
votes
3answers
63 views

electric current in parallel circuit [closed]

If I have a parallel circuit with two resistors ($R_1=48 \Omega$ and $R_2=16 \Omega$) - and $R_1$ has a $0.1 A$ current running through, is it possible to calculate the current through $R_2$ without ...
1
vote
3answers
86 views

Current through two inductors after a long time

I'm having trouble with visualizing the following problem, which is asking me for the final, steady current in both inductors $L_{1}$ and $L_{2}$. I was thinking that after a long time, essentially ...
6
votes
3answers
641 views

What happens if I throw a battery into water?

Today I have by accident thrown a AAA battery into a bucket of water. I fished it out of the water immediately (within 20 seconds or so) and nothing notable had happened and the battery is still full ...
1
vote
1answer
194 views

How does current flow perpendicular to the wire?

This answer gives a great explanation of how surface charge builds up to force the current to move perpendicular to the wire: http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/102936/41086 However, it fails to ...
2
votes
1answer
88 views

Do batteries lose charge?

Say I have a charge of +q and -q on the positive and negative terminals of a battery. If I connect wires to each terminal, but don't connect the wires (essentially creating an open circuit), the ...
1
vote
3answers
229 views

Why do both plates of a capacitor have the same charge?

How do we know that both plates of a capacitor have the same charge? You could argue conservation of charge, but I don't see how conservation of charge implies the charge on both plates is the same. ...
2
votes
4answers
244 views

Is a capacitor in an open circuit charged?

Say I have a circuit consisting of a battery, a wire, an open switch, and a capacitor. The circuit is open since the switch is open. My book says that the capacitor will only be charged when the ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Can resistance of wire be ignored

I was doing some physics homework involving direct current circuits and resistors in series, and I started to question the accuracy of the following property of resistors in series, namely that the ...
4
votes
1answer
321 views

Why doesn't the electric field inside a wire in a circuit fall off with distance from the battery?

We studied electric fields due to point charges. The magnitude of these fields decreases with the square of the distance from the point charge. It seems to me that we could treat the positive ...
6
votes
4answers
607 views

What is the current of a capacitor when the derivative of voltage is undefined?

This is from the textbook I am reading: I know this equation for capacitors: $$i=C\cdot \frac { dv }{ dt }$$ Here is my question: how can diagram (a) be allowed if the derivative of the voltage ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Energy in a Solenoid?

Consider a circuit consisting of a battery, a resistor and a solenoid inductor. Then, the emf $\mathcal{E}$, is defined as: $$\mathcal{E} = L\frac{di}{dt} + iR$$ Multiplying both sides by ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

Voltage Drop and Charge Flow

I am hoping someone can help me with understanding voltage drop and charge flow. Here is what I think I know. The voltage drop through a circuit must equal the voltage of the battery source, and ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Kirchoff Loop and current

The pic of the circuit/problem: I got the problem right, but i want to make sure my reasoning is correct for the current left of the 2.1 V battery. Its the same current as $I_1$ because the ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

The effects of reversing the leads of an ammeter

I was playing around with a battery, an ammeter, and a light bulb. The ammeter originally read 1.99 A, but after reversing the leads going into and out of the ammeter the ammeter read -1.98A. I know ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Different phase in capacitively coupled RLC circuits

I was trying to work with some data for a lab report I'm writing about capacitively coupled RLC circuits. The setup is pretty simple and looks like that: Where $C^{'}$ is the coupling capacitance. ...
-2
votes
2answers
65 views

Is R1 R2 and R3 parallel? [closed]

or R2 and R3 are parallel then they are in series with R1?
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Understanding Counter - EMF?

When an coil rotor is moving around a magnetic field there is -V induced to resist the input V. Let's take an example, a 12 V DC motor induces -10V, and the actual running voltage is 2V. If there ...
0
votes
2answers
647 views

Conversion of Moving coil galvanometer to ammeter

A galvanometer can be converted into an ammeter by connecting a low resistance (called shunt resistance) in parallel to the galvanometer. Firstly, why do we need to connect the resistance? If a ...
4
votes
1answer
73 views

How to get a function for the voltage across a capacitor connected to an AC voltage source? [closed]

I am looking for the way of obtaining a solution for $V_{c}$ ,as a function of $t$ depending of $\omega$, of the following differential equation related to an electrical circuit involving a low-pass ...
2
votes
1answer
213 views

How do capacitors work?

Say you have a battery, with a wire connecting the negative and positive terminal. Initially, (the transient state) the electric field is not uniform and is perpendicular to the surface of the cross ...
-1
votes
1answer
86 views

Electric shock from a frayed wire

Let's say it's a laptop charger not connected to a laptop, and it is frayed near the tip. I am guessing about 20Volts runs through that area. Now if a person touches a bit of plastic below the frayed ...
1
vote
2answers
232 views

Surface charge in a wire?

The image above shows the distribution of the surface charge in a current carrying wire. The surface charges distributes themselves to make sure the field inside the wire is always perpendicular to ...
3
votes
1answer
430 views

Electric field in a wire?

The electric field in a wire is parallel to the wire's surface (it is always pointing "to the front"). If the electric field did not point in this direction, surface charges would build up and ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Superposition theorem

Is superposition theorem applicable for circuits having semiconductor components like diodes, transistors, etc.?