The Doppler effect refers to change in the observed frequency of a wave if the observer and source are in relative motion.

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How do you measure distance to stars within the galaxy?

I know that for close by stars (<50 LY) we can use the parallax effect. And for distant galaxies we use red-shift (& hubble's constant). So how do we measure how far is a star lets say 50,000 ...
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How does the Hubble Redshift work?

I am a little confused about the workings of the Hubble Redshift. I do understand the classical Doppler-effect, however in special relativity the velocity of light c is a natural velocity limit. So ...
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Sounds of supersonic objects

Would you, as a stationary observer, hear a sound in reverse when the source of the sound travels with twice the speed of sound? Of course, he wouldn't hear anything at all before the airplane passed ...
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Doppler effect “apparent frequency”

In discussing Doppler effect, we use the word "apparent frequency". Does it mean that the frequency of the sound is still that of the source and it is some physiological phenomenon in the listener's ...
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Does time dilation correct for the Doppler effect?

Knowing that a body in motion experiences time dilation, "also" knowing when two objects travel at a great speed away from one an other, both observers experience the others clock as moving slower ...
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Why doesn't the motion of a car affect the frequency of radio stations?

When we go in a car and tune to an FM radio station, why doesn't our motion disturb the frequency? Like the Doppler effect?
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Tired light red shift hypothesis

Have there been any recent attempts to falsify the tired light hypothesis alternative to the Doppler shift explanation for the red shift, or is it simply ignored like the pilot wave quantum mechanical ...
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Hearing a sound backwards because of Doppler effect

Consider a supersonic plane (mach 2) aproaching a stationary sound source (e.g a fog horn on a boat). If I understand it correctly, the passengers in the plane can hear the sound twice. First at a 3 ...
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In terms of the Doppler effect, what happens when the source is moving faster than the wave?

I'm just trying to understand this problem from a qualitative perspective. The Doppler effect is commonly explained in terms of how a siren sounds higher in pitch as it is approaching a particular ...
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quantum explanation of doppler effect

How would quantum mechanics explain doppler effect? And just for curiosity, is there any effect similar to doppler effect occuring at quantum level?
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Doppler Shift when Light Travels Through Two Different Mediums

When considering the Doppler shift, the 'canonical equation' is $$f=\frac{c+vr}{c+vs}f_0$$ However, this equation seems to run into trouble in the following situation: A light source inside water is ...
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Could these hypothetical very long distance properties of light offer alternatives to an expanding universe or a finite number of galaxies?

Assume that there could be a property of light that it gets very gradually steadily red-shifted by traveling large astronomical distances, in exactly the same way that Doppler shift from receding ...
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Doppler shift for a uniformly accelerating observer

This was given in textbook as an example. An observer on a spaceship with a four velocity $u$ is approaching from $x = +\infty$ a star at rest in the reference frame $S$ while undergoing constant ...
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How does Doppler effect differ between EM -waves in Electrodynamics and Sound -waves?

I have an electrodynamics -course that contains doupler -effect but unfortunately with little explanations. Is it the same thing as the classical doppler effect for example with sound, more here, or ...
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Blue-shifting as opposed to violet-shifting

A recent XKCD comic implies that the sky is blue as opposed to violet due to human physiology, and that animals more sensitive to shorter wavelengths will perceive the Earth's sky as the shortest ...
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What happens to sound at speeds greater than mach 1? [duplicate]

We know that a moving source of sound waves produces Doppler shift, so that sound waves are closer-together in the front and farther apart behind, creating a difference in pitch. Let's consider a ...
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Redshifting of light from a moving light source

We know that the expansion of space causes redshifting of light. I even read somewhere that the Doppler effect also happens in light. So imagine I switch on the headlights of my car in front of a ...
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Doppler effect of sound waves

I am looking for interesting ways to introduce the Doppler effect to students. I want some situations in nature or every day life, where a student is possibly surprised and may ask "how could it be"? ...
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Equivalence principle and acceleration vs a gravitational field

I picked this up on the net: Einstein came to realize the principle of equivalence, and it states that an accelerated system is completely physically equivalent to a system inside a gravitational ...
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CMB anisotropy, temperature and doppler effect

How would you derive the following equation: $$ T' = T_{CMB} \left( \frac{\sqrt{1-v^2}}{1+v\cos{\theta}} \right) $$ which describes how the temperature of the CMB varies due to the speed $v$ of the ...
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Doppler effect- will frequency continually decrease?

My problems: I know that when a person is moving away, the perceived frequency will be lower than the frequency of the source. However, in the question, if the person is moving away, the ...