Dimensional analysis means to obtain results by analyzing the units in question, etc. DO NOT USE THIS TAG if your question is about degrees of freedom or spatial dimensions.

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Is there an official list of independent units of measurements?

When I say 'independent units', I mean those which cannot be broken down anymore, and simultaneously forms the basis for any more, complex measurements. For example, height, length, and width can all ...
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1answer
47 views

Are there physical law that are not unit-free?

One of the prerequisites of the Buckingham π theorem is that the physical law in question should be unit-free. I couldn't find an example of a physical law that is not unit-free. Is there such thing? ...
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4answers
60 views

Is the concept of work only defined in mechanics?

I'm studying energy and work, so far it looks like work only makes sense in kinematics (objects that move), but energy makes sense in many other ways (electric, thermodynamic, mechanic). Is work a ...
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1answer
40 views

How to identify the sign of a derived nondimensional parameter and its physical meaning?

I think that the nondimensional group is ordinarily defined to be positive value in a physical problem. But in some particular case, we probably need to decide the sign of a derived dimensionless ...
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3answers
100 views

How can geometrized units have more than one constant equal to 1?

I can understand how you could manipulate units to make a certain constant equal to $1$, like $c$ or $G$, et cetera. But how can you make it so two constants (in this case $c$ and $G$) are equal to ...
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When can the constant of proportionality in an eq be set equal to 1 and when not? [duplicate]

In $F=kma$, $k=1$ but in $F=kx$, $k$ is not equal to 1?So what are the conditions for the constant of proportionality to be set 1?
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2answers
52 views

What is the dimensional formula of angular velocity?

I have problem to determine the dimensional formula of angular velocity. My friend said that the dimensional formula of angular velocity is $T^{-1}$. It's come from rad/s, rad is dimensionless, the ...
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0answers
62 views

What does it mean to take a derivative with respect to $\hbar$?

Problem 6.32 of Griffiths Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, 2ed is In part (b), we take a derivative with respect to $\hbar$. Since $\hbar$ is a constant, what does it mean to take a derivative ...
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Unit of gradient/slope?

So I have a graph: The value of the gradient/slope is $1.6±0.4$ and the value of the intercept is $0.9±0.4$. But what are the units of the graph? Is the unit of the gradient $v^2M^{-1}$? What about ...
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1answer
316 views

What are the mathematical models for force, acceleration and velocity?

In mechanics, the space can be described as a Riemann manifold. Forces, then, can be defined as vector fields of this manifold. Accelerations are linear functions of forces, so they are covector ...
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1answer
30 views

Differences in notation of momentum 4 vector

I have noticed three ways to write the 4 momentum vectors: $P = (E/c, \vec{p})$ $P = (E, \vec{p})$ $P = (E, c\vec{p})$ I know how to derive equation 1, and as far as I know, one can use the ...
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1answer
61 views

Issues of normalization & differential final state momenta in analysis of normalized differential quantum-field-theoretic probability of scattering

The normalized differential quantum-field-theoretic probability $dP$ of scattering is given by $$dP=\frac{|\langle f |S|i\rangle|^{2}}{\langle f|f\rangle\langle i|i\rangle}d\Pi,$$ where $|i\rangle$ ...
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0answers
37 views

Photon Propagator in QFT

Please forgive my temporary split-brain, but I'm a little thrown off by something when considering units at the moment. In QED (depending on the guage), the photon propogator is written as ...
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13answers
10k views

Are units of angle really dimensionless?

I know mathematically the answer to this question is yes, and it's very obvious to see that the dimensions of a ratio cancel out, leaving behind a mathematically dimensionless quantity. However, I've ...
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1answer
50 views

The true dimension of Dirac field

In natural units with $\hbar=1$ and $c=1$, as we know, the energy dimension of the Dirac field $\psi(x)$ in QED is $\frac{3}{2}$. But in cgs units, what is the true dimension of the Dirac field ...
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1answer
319 views

Drag - Dimensional Analysis / Buckingham Pi

Dimensional Analysis / Buckingham Pi Theorem I'm working on dimensional analysis and I'm having trouble. Here's a problem from my book I'm working on for practice. I'm suppose to consider a small ...
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0answers
26 views

Finding the exponent of $\lambda$ in Wien's displacement law

I am reading this paper on a short history of the $T^4$ radiation law. In particular, on page 5, By assuming that the wavelength of radiation emitted by a molecule was a function only of its ...
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2answers
58 views

Proper units for physical quantities when $\hbar$=$1$

How to deal with the units of quantities if $\hbar=\tfrac{h}{2\pi}=1$? For example, the energy $E=\hbar\omega$: If I have chosen $\hbar=1$, how do I use the units to properly differentiate between ...
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0answers
27 views

Initial value in rescaling differential equation

I've re scaled the simple harmonic oscillator differential equation as below: original equation: $d^2x/dt^2+\omega^2x=0$ re scaling factor: $\omega t\to t'$ re scaled (dimensionless) equation: ...
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1answer
95 views

Is meters per second equivalent to seconds per meter?

I know this question is probably ridiculous, but bear with me for a moment. This thought emerged while I was converting between nm and wave numbers ($\rm cm^{-1}$). In order to prove this conversion, ...
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2answers
75 views

Use Runge Kutta method to solve schrodinger equation

The schrodinger equation in spherical coordinates after seperation of variables as a solution of hydrogen atom is given by $$ \frac{-\hbar^{2}}{2 \ m} \left[ \frac{1}{r^{2}} \frac{d}{dr} \left(r^{2} ...
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12answers
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Do all equations have identical units on the left- and right-hand sides?

Do all equations have $$\text{left hand side unit} = \text{right hand side unit}$$ for example, $$\text{velocity (m/s)} = \text{distance (m) / time (s)},$$ or is there an equation that has different ...
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0answers
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Arguing on dimensions of logarithms and exponentials [duplicate]

Suppose you have some physical quantity $x$ of dimension $l$. We all know that the dimension of $x^2$, for example, will be $l^2$, and that of $\dfrac{1}{x}$ is $l^{-1}$. However, what will be the ...
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1answer
129 views

Difference between theoretical equations and empirical equations

Some equations are theoretical in the sense that they are derived from an underlying theory. Other equations are empirical in the sense that they were selected only because they fit experimental data ...
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136 views

Why do constants have dimensions?

I am just a beginner in dimensional analysis, and I see that $G$, the universal gravitational constant, is independent of everything. Speed, for example, depends on distance and time, but $G$ does not ...
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9answers
2k views

How to interpret the units of the dot or cross product of two vectors?

Suppose I have two vectors $a=\left(1,2,3\right)$ and $b=\left(4,5,6\right)$, both in meters. If I take their dot product with the algebraic definition, I get this: $$a \cdot b = 1\mathrm m \cdot ...
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1answer
90 views

The dimension of the energy-momentum tensor and the Einstein-Hilbert action

I have been thinking recently what will happen if one uses the energy momentum tensor of the Dirac field as a source in the Einstein Field equations. It is well known that in this case $$ ...
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1answer
327 views

When can two quantities be added together?

Whenever two things are to be added together, one typically needs to check whether this actually makes sense, and an addition is said to make sense, in principle, when the units match up. Yet, ...
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3answers
49 views

Is “power to mass ratio” in fact independent to mass?

I was trying to find power to mass ratio of sun (work done per second at each unit mass at average), but I found the unit is quite straight: W=kg m^2 s^-3 Then ...
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0answers
50 views

What kind of unit is $m^2s^{-4}$ in terms of gyro/accel?

Background While working on something in the field of avionics, I have discovered the following unit as part of an inertial-physics equation... $$m^2s^{-4}$$ I am trying to figure out the formal ...
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5answers
161 views

What in nature causes Newton's gravitation constant to have its given value?

Does the value of Newton's universal gravitational constant $G$ remain a mystery? Why does it have the value that it has?
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1answer
62 views

A simple explanation of Kepler's Third Law

Is there a simple way to explain how Kepler's third law follows from the inverse square law that of gravity (and laws of motion) For example for Kepler's second law we can say it's because Gravity ...
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1answer
67 views

Dependence on UV cut off of some $\phi^4$ diagrams

Consider the one loop corrections to the propagator and the vertex in $\phi^4$-theory:                 ...
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5answers
130 views

What forms can units take?

They have stated in my physics book that all units can be made by combining SI base units. I have got a few question about this. Can we raise one unit to the power of another unit? For instance: ...
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1answer
28 views

What is “unity constant form” and why is it useful?

I read the following in a tutorial: The standard transfer function of a first order system is: $$G(s) = \frac{k}{s + a}$$ Arranging this into unity constant form gives: $$G(s) = ...
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2answers
130 views

Dimensions of physical quantities in quantum mechanics

In most introductory quantum mechanics classes, we are introduced to the Dirac notation, concept of the 'state' of the system being represented as an abstract vector in the Hilbert space associated ...
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Square bracket notation for dimensions and units: usage and conventions

One of the most useful tools in dimensional analysis is the use of square brackets around some physical quantity $q$ to denote its dimension as $$[q].$$ However, the precise meaning of this symbol ...
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0answers
52 views

What's the unit of fine-structure constant? [closed]

What's the unit of fine-structure constant? I mean in SI units.
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1answer
43 views

Proving that Planck's Law is dimensionally homogeneous [closed]

I would like to know whether it is possible to show that Planck's Law is dimensionally homogeneous, as well as the steps taken to prove it. $$B_\lambda(\lambda, T) =\frac{2 hc^2}{\lambda^5}\frac{1}{ ...
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Dimensional inconsistency in first law of black hole thermodynamics

The first law of black hole mechanics (let's simplify by considering a uncharged and non-rotating black hole) can be written as $$\delta M = T \delta S$$ If I use the definition of Hawking ...
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1answer
26 views

Dimensional interpretation of inverse gradient length $\frac{d}{dx} \ln(Y)$

Preliminary definition: inverse gradient length Let me first explain what I mean by that term. The inverse gradient length of some quantity $Y$ (often thermodynamic temperature $T$) $L_Y^{-1}$ is ...
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2answers
81 views

Functions and Length Scales

Regretfully I have to start with an apology as I fear I might be unable to express the question rigorously. Often reading physics papers the concept of "length scale" is used, in statements such as ...
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2answers
326 views

Why is the Fermi coupling constant always expressed in units of $(\hbar c)^3$?

Everywhere I've looked so far (such as NIST) the Fermi coupling constant $G_F$ is always expressed as $$\frac{G_F}{(\hbar c)^3} = 1.166 364(5) \times 10^{-5} \textrm{ GeV}^{-2}$$ never as just ...
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33 views

Pressure inside a typical white dwarf

Does any one know the order of magnitude of pressure inside a typical white dwarf (better with reference)? Thanks! I think it should be $m_e^4c^5/h^3$ (may be multiplied by $\pi$), which is $10^{22} ...
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1answer
80 views

Connection between the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ and the cutoff scale $\Lambda$

I'm trying to understand the connection between the $\Lambda$ from cosmology and the $\Lambda$ from QFT. Cosmology: The cosmological constant enters the Einstein equations. In the special case of the ...
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1answer
183 views

Moment of Inertia and Linear Dimensions

For similar solid bodies made from constant density, how does the Moment of Inertia about a particular axis vary with linear dimensions? This is from an school textbook. I have covered all of MI ...
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1answer
94 views

What defines a physical property? [closed]

The physical world around us has all sorts of properties, shape, color etc. If you move on to more complex systems, there are even more like some emotional properties etc. Why do we deem only ...
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4answers
4k views

Fundamental question about dimensional analysis

In dimensional analysis, it does not make sense to, for instance, add together two numbers with different units together. Nor does it make sense to exponentiate two numbers with different units (or ...
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118 views

Newton's Second Law of Motion

Newton originally wrote his second law as: "The rate of change of momentum of a body is directly proportional to the resultant force applied to the body, and is in the same direction as the force." ...
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How to get Planck length

I know that what Planck length equals to. The first question is, how do you get the formula $$\ell_P~=~\sqrt\frac{\hbar G}{c^3}$$ that describes the Planck length? The second question is, will any ...