0
votes
1answer
46 views

Crystal diffraction for waves vs particles

I thought that I understand the "Bragg's Law" understanding of crystal diffraction, but recently I read something that made me confused. I understand that if the planes in the crystal have ...
0
votes
1answer
164 views

Matter Waves Interference

When an EM wave diffracts, I can imagine that its EM field interacts with the charges in a certain obstacle thus inducing a wave behaviour on the charges of the matter that will interact with the EM ...
1
vote
2answers
86 views

What happens to the physical properties of electrons after diffraction?

Particle Wave duality shows us that waves and particles are the same thing. Therefore electrons can be viewed as both particles and waves. The wave properties of electrons can be seen in the double ...
5
votes
2answers
334 views

Why does light diffract only through slits?

We can see diffraction of light if we allow light to pass through a slit, but why doesn't diffraction occur if we obstruct light using some other object, say a block? Why are shadows formed? Why ...
0
votes
0answers
75 views

Crystalography - hardest homework problem i have seen so far

The problem statement: We are observing an electron diffraction on a "Ni" crystal. We point the narrow beam of electrons on a crystal which can be rotated so that we are changing the angle ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What does happen when we rotate crystal while at the same time we shoot a narrow beam of electrons at it

I know that if we shoot narrow beam of electrons at the crystal (we don't change the angle) we will get a diffraction of electrons according to the brag's law. Therefore we get minimums and maximums ...
3
votes
2answers
256 views

Photons-Wave/particle duality

I know that photons and electrons and such are said to have a wave particle duality, but what does that mean for a photon? When light strikes an object, are many photons emitted, enough to draw ...
6
votes
1answer
152 views

Will a football (soccer) diffract?

Apparently all objects have wavelike properties, so, if we kick a football (soccer ball, if you must) through a pair of posts, does the ball in any sense diffract? If this is ridiculous then let me ...