The tag has no wiki summary.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
3answers
111 views

Ordering of differential operators

If we write something like: $\partial_a X_{\mu} \partial^a X^{\mu}$ Does that mean the first derivative is only applied to the first X? ($\partial_a X_{\mu})( \partial^a X^{\mu}$) Or is the ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

How to derive the schwarzchild metric?

I'm having trouble differentiating the following when making a change of co-ordinates to determine the Schwarzchild metric. $$r'^{2}=r^{2}C(r)$$ Then taking the total derivative of both sides, the ...
1
vote
3answers
154 views

Physical motivation for differentiation under the integral

I am thinking about the mathematical process of "differentiating underneath the integral", i.e. applying the theorem $$\partial_s \int_{-\infty}^\infty f(x,s)\,dx=\int_{-\infty}^\infty \partial_s ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Fermion propagator is not a Grassmann-odd object?

Is the following differentiation correct: $$ \frac{\delta}{\delta\eta\left(z\right)}\int d^{4}yS_{F}\left(z-y\right)\eta\left(y\right) = S_F\left(z-z\right)$$ where $\eta$ is a Grassmann-valued ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Covariant derivative of a vanishing tensor component [closed]

Is the covariant derivative of a vanishing tensor component necessarily zero?
6
votes
4answers
375 views

Name this Mulltivariable Calculus Theorem

In Robert Wald's book General Relativity a multivariable calculus theorem is cited on page 16, which states: If $F:\mathbb{R}^n\mapsto \mathbb{R}$ is $C^{\infty}$ then for each $a=(a^1,...,a^n) \in ...
-3
votes
0answers
51 views

Why does $d$ mean? [migrated]

What do the $d$'s mean? I've seen them in other formulas as well.
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Finding an equation for velocity and acceleration

I'm trying to derive an equation for the velocity and acceleration of an object undergoing simple harmonic motion. I have the equation for displacement: $x = A\sin (2 \pi ft)$ If I differentiate the ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Differentiate wave speed, don't understand

The speed $v$ of some wave is $ω/k$ and I want to differentiate this with respect to $k$. Apparently this equals: $dv/dk = d(ω/k)/dk-ω/k^2$ But I don't understand why. Isn't this just saying "the ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Covariant derivative as a tensor

$$\nabla_{j} v^{i}~=~g^{ik}\nabla_{j}v_{k}.$$ Does this equality involve an intermediate step, where I take the metric inside the derivative, and then use the fact that covariant derivative of the ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Help deriving the general linear wave equation $d^2y/dx^2=(1/v^2)d^2y/dt^2$ [closed]

How do I derive the General Linear Wave Equation $$d^2y/dx^2=(1/v^2)d^2y/dt^2?$$ My teacher differentiated the general wave function $f(x + vt)+g(x - vt)$ twice with respect to both variables to get ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Taking time derivative of two dependant variables

I'm not entirely sure if this is correct. I have to take the time derivative of the following: $$\frac{d}{dt}mr^{2}\dot{\phi}$$ Now, both $r$ and $\dot{\phi}$ depends on the time $t$, so I have to ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

How to do this index notation differentiation?

I am studying classical Maxwell fields and I am stuck on this differentiating part. How can I derive the result given below ? $$\dfrac{\partial}{\partial(\partial A_{\mu}/\partial x_{\nu})} ...
6
votes
4answers
432 views

What is the current of a capacitor when the derivative of voltage is undefined?

This is from the textbook I am reading: I know this equation for capacitors: $$i=C\cdot \frac { dv }{ dt }$$ Here is my question: how can diagram (a) be allowed if the derivative of the voltage ...
18
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between implicit and explicit time dependence e.g. $\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial t}$ and $\frac{d \rho} {dt}$?

What is the difference between implicit and explicit time dependence e.g. $\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial t}$ and $\frac{d \rho} {dt}$? I know one is a partial derivative and the other is a total ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Finding the Lagrangian from the derivative of position

I have to find the Lagrangian for a system. In the point of interest I have come up with the following position coordinates: $$x = Rcos(\omega t)+\ell sin(\phi)$$ and $$y = Rsin(\omega t)-\ell ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Why do these equations result an incorrect unit for acceleration?

Hello everyone. Imagine an object moving around a certain point on a circular orbit. Magnitude of the velocity is constant during the motion ($|v|$). The orbit radius is $r$. (I'd better notice ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Vector Derivative Transport Theorem Application

I have a position vector in frame A, the derivative of which I want to take relative to an observer in frame B. I apply the Vector Derivative Transport Theorem. The obtained velocity vector is left in ...
10
votes
2answers
333 views

Lagrangian Mechanics - Commutativity Rule $\frac{d}{dt}\delta q=\delta \frac{dq}{dt} $

I am reading about Lagrangian mechanics. At some point the difference between the temporal derivative of a variation and variation of the temporal derivative is discussed. The fact that the two are ...
2
votes
1answer
165 views

What is a covariant derivative in gauge theory?

I've been studying electroweak theory and you need to keep the Lagrangian covariant by introducing covariant derivatives. What is a covariant derivative? And what does it mean to keep the Lagrangian ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Derivatives of operators

How do derivatives of operators work? Do they act on the terms in the derivative or do they just get "added to the tail"? Is there a conceptual way to understand this? For example: say you had the ...
3
votes
2answers
165 views

Derivative with respect to a vector is a gradient?

I've encountered in some books (and even completed an exercise from the Goldstein by using it), a strange notation that seems to work exactly like a gradient, I have tried to look for an explanation ...
4
votes
1answer
68 views

Higgs mechanism in QED

I'm trying to understand the Higgs mechanics. For that matter, I'm exploring the possibility of giving mass to the photon in a gauge-invariant way. So, if we introduce a complex scalar field: $$ ...
1
vote
1answer
587 views

Gravitational force exerted by a rod on a point mass

I have doubts with the solution of a certain problem. I will give the entire solution below and will lay out my doubts as well. A point mass $m_1$ is separated by a distance $r$ from a long rod of ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Derive vector gradient in spherical coordinates from first principles

Trying to understand where the $\frac{1}{r sin(\theta)}$ and $1/r$ bits come in the definition of gradient. I've derived the spherical unit vectors but now I don't understand how to transform ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

Neglecting second order differentials

I am currently doing some Lorentz invariance exercises considering infinitesimal Lorentz transformations, and have been told to neglect second order differentials. It's not the first time I have come ...
37
votes
3answers
2k views
7
votes
1answer
229 views

When motion begins, do objects go through an infinite number of position derivatives?

This might be a very vague and unclear question, but let me explain. When an object at rest moves, or moves from point $A$ to point $B$, we know the object must have had some velocity (1st derivative ...
1
vote
0answers
103 views

Scale-invariant differential operator

For example, the differential operator Laplacian is $$\nabla^2 = \frac{\partial^2}{\partial x^2}+\frac{\partial^2}{\partial y^2}.$$ My questions are: Is it scale-invariant? what is ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Feynman's subscript notation

Consider this vector calculus identity: $$ \mathbf{A} \times \left( \nabla \times \mathbf{B} \right) = \nabla_\mathbf{B} \left( \mathbf{A \cdot B} \right) - \left( \mathbf{A} \cdot \nabla \right) ...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

Covariant derivative-Differential

I was trying to prove that the derivative-four vector are covariant. This can be proved only if you consider the time and space derivatives to be $\dfrac{\partial}{\partial ...
1
vote
4answers
718 views

When we take time derivative of a function of time, then is the result another function of time, again?

(I'll try to explain my question by one known example), for example where the velocity is a function of time v(t) then its time derivative (which is acceleration: $a=\frac {dv}{dt}$) is another ...
18
votes
6answers
5k views

Laplace operator's interpretation

What is your interpretation of Laplace operator? When evaluating Laplacian of some scalar field at a given point one can get a value. What does this value tell us about the field or it's behaviour in ...
-2
votes
2answers
144 views

Why and how maximum force is $\frac{dF}{dx}=0$

In an certain question my teacher asked to find the maximum force. She said that the maximum force in electrostatics means $\frac{dF}{dx}=0$. Why is it like that?
0
votes
3answers
169 views

Meaning of “Gradient with respect to coordinates of particle” in SPH

I'm currently trying to implement a simple SPH simulation based on a variety of papers. However as I'm not a trained physicist nor mathematician I have a small issue with the following notation and ...
0
votes
0answers
101 views

What is difference between $\frac {dr}{dt}$ and $\frac {\partial r}{\partial t}$? [duplicate]

What is difference in physical meaning of partial time derivative and ordinary derivative of $r$? $$\frac {\partial r}{\partial t}\quad\text{and}\quad \frac {dr}{dt}.$$ I know that ordinary time ...
-9
votes
3answers
157 views

Is there any other mathematical tool to measure velocity, instead useing derivative? [closed]

To measure velocity we use derivative $$v=\frac {dr}{dt}.$$ Is the any other mathematical tool to do this?
0
votes
1answer
87 views

In Newtonian pressure, what type of function is force?

This is pressure in Newtonian mechanics: $$P=\frac {dF}{dA}.$$ What does this mean? (Doesn't it mean that force is a function of area?) What type of function is force?
0
votes
3answers
227 views

Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?

In a current vs potential difference graph, we can obtain the value of the resistance of the component. There are books that say gradient-inverse is the resistance and also books that say the value of ...
10
votes
1answer
425 views

Is there a “covariant derivative” for conformal transformation?

A primary field is defined by its behavior under a conformal transformation $x\rightarrow x'(x)$: $$\phi(x)\rightarrow\phi'(x')=\left|\frac{\partial x'}{\partial x}\right|^{-h}\phi(x)$$ It's fairly ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Difference between $\Delta$, $d$ and $\delta$

I have read the thread regarding 'the difference between the operators between $\delta$ and $d$', but it does not answer my question. I am confused about the notation for change in Physics. In ...
1
vote
1answer
209 views

Arbitrary tensor covariant derivative

what are the rules for performing covariant derivatives on tensors of arbitrary rank? I found a few examples of Tensor derivatives: $$\nabla_{c} T^a {}_{b} = \partial_{c}T^a {}_{b}+ \Gamma^a{}_{cd} ...
0
votes
0answers
105 views

Why does the cross derivative of the partition function disappear here?

They state that the chemical potential in a canonical ensemble is given by: $$\mu = -kT \frac{\partial{\ln Z(N,V,T)}}{\partial{N}} \tag{1}$$ But if I use the definition of chemical partial (which I ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Is there any case where one would use, snap, crackle or pop? [duplicate]

As we all know, if you differentiate distance with reference to time, you get speed, and likewise, differentiating speed you get acceleration. However, if you keep differentiating, to the rate of ...
1
vote
2answers
548 views

What is the common difference between partial time derivative and ordinary time derivative? [duplicate]

What is difference between partial and ordinary time derivative? for example: what is difference between $\frac {\partial v}{\partial t}$ and $\frac {dv}{dt}$? where the $v$ is velocity.
1
vote
2answers
132 views

What is path of light in the accelerating elevator?

Mathematically, (by mathematically I means by equations) what is path of light in the accelerating elevator? What is the difference between an ordinary derivative and covariant derivative (which is ...
5
votes
7answers
567 views

Physical intuition for higher order derivatives

Could somebody give me an intuitive physical interpretation of higher order derivatives (from 2 and so on), that is not related to position - velocity - acceleration - jerk - etc?
1
vote
0answers
115 views

Implicit Differentiation, A doubt

$v=v_c(\tau, t)$ is a smooth function and suppose we have a relation $y_c(\tau,v_c;t)=0$ when $x_c$ is written in the form $x_c=c+ty_c(\tau,v_c;t)$, $c$ is real constant, $t$ is real number denotes ...
5
votes
6answers
2k views

How is gradient the maximum rate of change of a function?

Recently I read a book which described about gradient. It says $${\rm d}T~=~ \nabla T \cdot {\rm d}{\bf r},$$ and suddenly they concluded that $\nabla T$ is the maximum rate of change of $f(T)$ ...
3
votes
6answers
655 views

Is acceleration $a = s/t^2$, or $a = 2s/t^2$, or something third?

I'm having trouble understanding some of the stuff regarding movement in my introductory physics class (I never thought I'd say that...) Acceleration is defined as $ a = \frac{s}{t^2}.$ Distance can ...