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32 views

Usage of delta operator [duplicate]

So I've always thought that "$\Delta$" when applied to an n-tuple or scalar was the change of that n-tuple or scalar relative to a previous state in time and proportional to the amount of time or ...
0
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1answer
82 views

What is the difference between $\frac{DA^\mu}{D\lambda}$ and $\frac{DA^\mu}{d\lambda}$?

I earlier asked this question How can you have $\frac{DA^\mu}{d\tau}$? I am now wondering: What is the difference between $\frac{DA^\mu}{D\lambda}$ and $\frac{DA^\mu}{d\lambda}$? In the linked ...
0
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1answer
87 views

How can you have $\frac{DA^\mu}{d\tau}$?

If a covariant derivative is given by: $$D_\nu A^\mu=\partial_\nu A^\mu +\Gamma^\mu_{\nu \lambda} A^{\lambda}$$ Then how does $\frac{DA^\mu}{d\tau}$ make any sense? Since there are no 'differentials' ...
1
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2answers
65 views

Units of the derivative of a function

I have a function $\phi(\mu, \sigma)$. $\mu$ and $\sigma$ are voltages (in mV in my case), so $\phi$ is a function of two voltages. $\phi$ itself, however, is in units of time (ms in my case). ...
2
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1answer
174 views

Differentiation of a vector with respect to a vector

Does differentiation of a vector with respect to a vector make any sense? Even if it makes sense, how does it make any physical meaning? I mean what is the physical interpretation?
0
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0answers
65 views

Can I Wick-contract terms with derivatives with terms without derivatives?

Consider for example the QCD three point vertex, can I contract a gluon field with the gluon field with a derivative in the vertex?
0
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3answers
188 views

Curl of a vector field [closed]

What is the physical interpretation of curl of a vector field? Just as divergence implies flux through a surface. I mean if $\vec A$ is a vector field, what does $\left(\nabla \times \vec A \right)$ ...
-1
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1answer
53 views

Forced damped harmonic motion, angular frequency at which amplitude is maximum. differentiation [closed]

$$A_0 = \frac{(F_0/m)}{\sqrt{(\omega_0^2-\omega_d^2)^2+b^2\omega_d^2/m^2}}$$ How would I differentiate this with respect to the driven angular frequency (equating to zero) in order to obtain the max ...
0
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2answers
230 views

Variation of square root of determinant of metric, $\delta g$ [closed]

I am trying to calculate $$ \frac{\partial \sqrt{- g}}{\partial g^{\mu \nu}},$$ where $g = \text{det} g_{\mu \nu}$. We have $$ \frac{\partial \sqrt{- g}}{\partial g^{\mu \nu}} = - \frac{1}{2 ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

What does it mean to differentiate a spinor-valued field?

Peskin and Schroeder, equation 3.28, states that the Klein-Gordon equation $$(\partial^2+m^2)\psi=0 \tag{3.28}$$ is a valid choice of equation for a Dirac spinor field. Their explanation makes sense ...
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3answers
320 views

How does uncertainty/error propagate with differentiation?

I have a noisy temperature (T) vs. time (t) measurement and I want to calculate dT/dt. If I approximate $dT/dt = \Delta T/\Delta t$ then the noise in the derivative gets too high and the derivative ...
1
vote
1answer
109 views

Geometric meaning of spin connection

A very short question: Does the spin connection that we encounter in General Relativity $$\omega_{\mu,ab}$$ have a geometric meaning? I am supposing it does because it comes from mathematical terms ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Issues with the chain rule in derivatives in chiral perturbation theory [duplicate]

I realize that this is a purely math question, which however has arisen in a physics computation. The reason to post it here is that I want a fast dirty answer. Not something cluttered with ...
0
votes
2answers
94 views

Changing coordinates in partial derivatives, re: Hydrogen atom

At around 11:35 in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q99ygFeWGv4 the instructor is using a "standard way of changing coordinates" in partial derivatives relating to the new variables of ...
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5answers
843 views

What does it mean for a physical quantity if its mixed second partial derivatives are not equal?

This goes for every problem (either in electromagnetism or fluid dynamics) that has to do with vector fields. Say we have a fluid flowing in a closed circular pipe (or an electromagnetic field, the ...
1
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0answers
50 views

Dependence of scattering amplitudes on Mandelstam variables

It is well-known that scattering amplitudes in QFT are tensors, hence e.g. scalar amplitudes /written in momentum space/ depend only on the Mandelstam variables of the external momenta, involved in ...
0
votes
3answers
110 views

Difference between $|d{\bf r}|$ and $d|{\bf r}|$

What is the difference between $|d{\bf r}|$ and $d|{\bf r}|$ and why are both of them not always equal to each other? My question might seem stupid to some and will probably get downvoted but I have ...
2
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3answers
311 views

How do I know what variable to use for the chain rule?

In my textbook the tangential acceleration is given like this: $$a_t=\frac{dv}{dt}=r\frac{dw}{dt}$$ $$a_t=rα$$ I understand that the chain rule is applied here like this: ...
3
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1answer
69 views

Gradient in the Frenet-Serret coordinate

I was simply thinking that the gradient in the Frenet-Serret coordinate at a particular point is similar to the gradient in the Cartesian coordinate. I simply assumed that Frenet space is an ...
1
vote
4answers
571 views

Why is $F=-\nabla V$?

I came across this equation $$F=-\nabla V$$ where $V$ is potential energy. I do understand that $$F(r)=-\frac{dV}{dr}.$$ Hence does this mean the nabla operator in this case means derivative? Because ...
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3answers
1k views

Derivative of kinetic energy [closed]

I read that the derivative of kinetic energy=$F\cdot v$. I tried to differentiate (1/2) mv^2 with respect to time but each time I am getting $m*v$ and not $m*a*v$ which solves to $F*v$. My efforts are ...
0
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3answers
69 views

Acceleration derivative

I am reading Morris Kline's "Calculus" and I fail to understand this notation: We have acceleration to which an object $r$ feet from the center of the earth (and above the earth) is subject. If we ...
0
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2answers
143 views

Physical meaning of divergence

While reading the section on Hamiltonian mechanics in Taylor's Classical mechanics, I realized that I didn't fully understand what he was saying when he was explaining why ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Taking a derivative in a dynamic mass balance?

I'm practicing for a transport phenomena exam and I came across this question: A mothball with a diameter of 1.0 cm is hung (by a thread) in stationary air. Mothballs consist of pure naphthalene. ...
-1
votes
1answer
28 views

How is this trigonometric substitution achieved for this simple capacitor circuit equation?

In a simple circuit with one capacitor and one AC source, where the equation of the source voltage is v(t) = Acos(ωt), I was trying to follow how they found the ...
1
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0answers
101 views

How is $\delta s$ different than $ds$? [duplicate]

Specifically I'm reading Dirac's General Relativity and he says essentially: $$ \delta Q = \frac{\partial Q}{\partial x^\mu} \delta x^\mu $$ But what's the difference between this and: $$ dQ = ...
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3answers
155 views

Is there a way to see that $ \nabla_\mu g_{\nu \rho} = 0 $ without explicit computation, where $\nabla_\mu$ refers to the covariant derivative?

In books, it is usually said that this is a consequence of the fact that parallel transport preserves dot product. How ?
0
votes
1answer
58 views

How do I set when the object isn't moving

I started studying instantaneous velocity derivatives using only now. It may seem stupid but really I'm not sure whether that's right: I have an equation: $$x (t) = 1.5t - 9,75t³$$ To set the time ...
1
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1answer
113 views

Covariant derivative ordering

I was working on a problem involving Bianchi identities, in a particular case I have to take the covariant derivative of the following, which indeed is the Ricci tensor in linearised limit ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

How can the D'Alembertian of a field be interpreted intuitively?

The D'Alembertian operator is defined as $$ \Box = g^{\nu\mu}\nabla_\nu\nabla_\mu $$ For the Minkowski metric in Cartesian coordinates that is $$ \Box=\frac{1}{c^2}\frac{\partial^2}{\partial t^2} - ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Partial derivatives of chiral superfields with respect to scalar components in the superpotential

I am following some notes on supersymmetry by Matteo Bertolini and I need some clarification. Chapter five deals with sypersymmetric Lagrangians and the superpotential is introduced. It is stated ...
0
votes
1answer
201 views

Classical Mechanics, The Theoretical Minimum: error in answer to partial derivatives exercise? [closed]

I'm reading Leonard Susskind's Classical Mechanics, The Theoretical Minimum, and I'm on the interlude on partial derivatives. There is an exercise that asks you to find all of the first and second ...
1
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0answers
43 views

Specific heat at constant volume

Me and my friend came across this derivation is some lecture notes of our thermal physics module. We have been trying to calculate the partial differential of the internal energy but cannot get the ...
0
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0answers
134 views

What is the meaning of symbols $\delta f$ and $\delta^2f$?

Professor was using these symbols to derive the continuity equation. He defined the infinitesimal mass as $\delta^2m=\rho \delta V$ and the mass that leaves some closed boundary $\partial V$ as ...
1
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2answers
239 views

Total time derivative of magnetic vector potential $A$

I am looking at this document, which tries to establish the Lagrangian of the Lorentz force. Everything is fine, but I don't see why: $$\frac{dA_i}{dt}=\frac{\partial A_i}{\partial t}+\frac{\partial ...
1
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1answer
158 views

Proof for Negele and Orland equation (2.34)

The equation (2.34) of Negele and Orland has $$\mathcal H_\text{A}(\hat{\mathbf p},\hat{\mathbf x}) = \frac{1}{2m}\left(\hat {\mathbf p} - \frac e c \mathbf A(\hat{\mathbf x})\right)^2.\tag{2.34a}$$ ...
3
votes
1answer
110 views

Why is the gauge potential $A_{\mu}$ in the Lie algebra of the gauge group $G$?

If we have a general gauge group whose action is $$ \Phi(x) \rightarrow g(x)\Phi(x), $$ with $g\in G$. Then introducing the gauge covariant derivative $$ D_{\mu}\Phi(x) = ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Electric current notation

Depending on the source, I sometimes read $\frac{\delta q}{dt}$ , $\frac{dq}{dt}$ or even $\frac{\delta q}{\delta t}$ (rare) Wich one is the correct notation ? In theory we are to know if a ...
15
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4answers
761 views

Lie derivative vs. covariant derivative in the context of Killing vectors

Let me start by saying that I understand the definitions of the Lie and covariant derivatives, and their fundamental differences (at least I think I do). However, when learning about Killing vectors I ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Varying wrt metric [closed]

I saw people write $\frac{\partial( F^{ab} F_{ab})}{\partial g^{ef}}$ as $\frac {\partial (g^{ca}g^{db}F_{cd}F_{ab})}{\partial g^{ef}}$ in a way that exposes the dependence on the metric. but ...
2
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2answers
87 views

Lack of rigour in usual derivation of Work-Energy Theorem

The derivation of the Work-Energy theorem usually goes as follows: You define the work done on a particle under net force $\vec{F}$ as $$W=\int\limits_C \vec{F}\cdot\mathrm{d}\vec{r}$$ And then you ...
2
votes
2answers
144 views

Differential operators in curvilinear coordinates

In the appendix A of Griffith's Electrodynamics text, he cites Spivak's Calculus on Manifolds as a reference more a more complete treatment of taking the gradient, curl, divergence, and Laplacian in ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Eulerian mass conservation on a stream line to Lagrangian mass conservation

if the density of a fluid particle is conserved on a streamline, $$\frac{d\rho}{dt}=0.$$ Why does this mean $$\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial t}+(\mathbf{v}\cdot\nabla)\rho=0$$ is true everywhere? Why ...
1
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0answers
108 views

How is Infinitesimal coordinate transformation related to Lie derivatives?

I am reading the book "Gravitaion and Cosmology" by S. Weinberg. In section 10.9, while discussing Lie derivatives of tensors of different ranks, he makes a general comment: The effect of an ...
1
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1answer
74 views

Lagrangian formalism (demonstration)

My question is about the multiplicity of the Lagrangian to a Physics system. I pretend to demonstrate the following proposition: For a system with $n$ degrees of freedom, written by the ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

What is the function type of the generalized momentum?

Let $$L:{\mathbb R}^n\times {\mathbb R}^n\times {\mathbb R}\to {\mathbb R}$$ denote the Lagrangian (it should be differentiable) of a classical system with $n$ spatial coordinates. In the action ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Show $\frac{\partial T}{\partial \dot q_j} = m_i \dot r_i^T\frac{\dot r_i }{\partial \dot q_j} $ [closed]

This is a basic result in lagrangian mecanics. Let $T$ be the kinetic energy, $r_i$ be the position of the $i^{th}$ particle in the system I need to show $$\frac{\partial T}{\partial \dot q_j} = ...
6
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1answer
299 views

Physical intuition/interpretation of fractional derivatives/integrals?

Oftentimes, when the derivative and integral operations are introduced within the realm of physics, we are taught some physical interpretation of them: Velocity is the derivative of position ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Estimating divergence of set of vectors

I have a set of points where directions and intensities of a flow are given (in 3D). Is it possible to estimate the divergence of the flow defined by those vectors? I only need a rough estimate and I ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Meaning the symbol, $W$ and $dW$

What's the difference between $W$ and $dW$? They are both work done and have similar formulae (same dimension). But I don't know the difference between them. $dW$ here ISN'T power.