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1answer
221 views

How to find the intrinsic covariant derivative component?

How to find the intrinsic covariant derivative component? In general relativity the elements of the acceleration four-vector are related to the elements of the four-velocity through a covariant ...
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0answers
119 views

Nicholas Kollerstrom article on the history of Calculus

Today, Newton´s birthday, I read an article posted in the arXiv by Nicholas Kollerstrom http://www.arxiv.org/abs/1212.2666 That basically claims that Newton did not invent Calculus. The article does ...
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2answers
1k views

Finding an equation for velocity and acceleration

I'm trying to derive an equation for the velocity and acceleration of an object undergoing simple harmonic motion. I have the equation for displacement: $x = A\sin (2 \pi ft)$ If I differentiate the ...
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2answers
160 views

Notation for differential operators and wave function math

I know that $[\frac {d^2}{dx^2}]\psi$ is $\frac {d^2\psi}{dx^2}$ but what about this one $[\frac {d^2\psi}{dx^2}]\psi^*$? Is it this like $\frac {d^2\psi\psi^*}{dx^2}$ or this like $\frac ...
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7answers
567 views

Physical intuition for higher order derivatives

Could somebody give me an intuitive physical interpretation of higher order derivatives (from 2 and so on), that is not related to position - velocity - acceleration - jerk - etc?
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1answer
180 views

Clarification on a Goldstein formula steps (classical mechanics)

At page 20 of Classical Mechanics' Goldstein (Third edition), there are these two steps given between eqs. (1.51) and (1.52): $$\sum_i m_i \ddot {\bf r}_i \cdot \frac{\partial {\bf r_i}}{ \partial ...
0
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1answer
857 views

How to get the gradient potential in polar coordinate

In polar coordinate, $$\nabla U = \frac{\partial U}{\partial r}\hat{\mathbf{r}} + \frac{1}{r}\frac{\partial U}{\partial \theta}\hat{\mathbf{\theta}} .$$ Can anyone show me how to get this result?
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2answers
251 views

What are $\partial_t$ and $\partial^\mu$?

I'm reading the Wikipedia page for the Dirac equation: $\rho=\phi^*\phi\,$ ...... $J = -\frac{i\hbar}{2m}(\phi^*\nabla\phi - \phi\nabla\phi^*)$ with the conservation of probability ...
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3answers
121 views

How to recognize broken candies from whole ones [closed]

Let's say I have a bag full of sugar candy. Some will be whole, some will be dent, some will be broken (in part, or half, etc). Let's say I have a device with an input box where I empty the bag, and ...
1
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4answers
650 views

Which Schrodinger equation is correct?

In the coordinate representation, in 1D, the wave function depends on space and time, $\Psi(x,t)$, accordingly the time dependent Schrodinger equation is $$H\Psi(x,t) = ...
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2answers
231 views

What does $\textbf{f} = -\boldsymbol{\nabla} u$ mean in practice and how is it computed?

In classical computer simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, one integrates Newton's equations of motion to determine particle trajectories. If we think of Newton's Second Law as ...
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3answers
700 views

What is the relation between (physicists) functional derivatives and Fréchet derivatives

I´m wondering how can one get to the definition of Functional Derivative found on most Quantum Field Theory books: $$\frac{\delta F[f(x)]}{\delta f(y) } = \lim_{\epsilon \rightarrow 0} ...
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6answers
5k views

Laplace operator's interpretation

What is your interpretation of Laplace operator? When evaluating Laplacian of some scalar field at a given point one can get a value. What does this value tell us about the field or it's behaviour in ...
5
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6answers
2k views

How is gradient the maximum rate of change of a function?

Recently I read a book which described about gradient. It says $${\rm d}T~=~ \nabla T \cdot {\rm d}{\bf r},$$ and suddenly they concluded that $\nabla T$ is the maximum rate of change of $f(T)$ ...
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2answers
884 views

Derivative of the product of operators

I'm asked to show that $\frac{d(\hat{A}\hat{B})}{d\lambda} = \frac{d\hat{A}}{d\lambda}\hat{B} + \hat{A}\frac{d\hat{b}}{d\lambda}$ With $\lambda$ a continuous parameter Should I use the definition ...
18
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3answers
2k views

What is the difference between implicit and explicit time dependence e.g. $\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial t}$ and $\frac{d \rho} {dt}$?

What is the difference between implicit and explicit time dependence e.g. $\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial t}$ and $\frac{d \rho} {dt}$? I know one is a partial derivative and the other is a total ...