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3
votes
1answer
44 views

Partial derivatives vs total derivatives in thermodynamics

The specific heat of a system is defined as $$C_z = T \left( \frac{\partial S}{\partial T} \right)_{z=\text{const}}$$ Sometimes however, I find the same definition, but with total derivatives ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

How does the gradient operator pick up a minus sign when the reference frame is switched from one particle to another? [on hold]

A potential between two particles, $i$ and $j$, is given as a function only of the separation distance, $$V_{ij} = V_{ij}(|r_i − r_j|)$$ It should follow that the force by $j$ on $i$ is equal and ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Use of the chain rule in kinematics problems for quantities given in function of the position [closed]

I don't understand the use and the meaning of the application of the chain rule in some situations. For istance, consider a 2D motion and the equation of trajectory described by a point $y=f(x)$. ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Divergence of inverse of metric tensor

I know that the Levi-civita connection preserves the metric tensor. Is the divergence of the inverse of metric tensor zero, too?! I'm not so familiar with the divergence of the second ranked tensor. ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Feynman lectures, Volume I, chapter 13-4 [migrated]

While reading Feynman lectures on Physics, volume I, Chapter 13-4, I found following assumption, which I don't understand: Then, since $r^2 = \rho^2 + a^2$, $\rho\,d\rho = r\,dr$. Therefore ... ...
3
votes
1answer
22 views

Dimensional interpretation of inverse gradient length $\frac{d}{dx} \ln(Y)$

Preliminary definition: inverse gradient length Let me first explain what I mean by that term. The inverse gradient length of some quantity $Y$ (often thermodynamic temperature $T$) $L_Y^{-1}$ is ...
3
votes
2answers
67 views

Exact differentials and state functions

I was reading a Wiki article on the relationships between heat capacities And during the derivation I came across this formula (and others like it): This equation was used as a tool in a ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Higher order versions of momentum? Can conservation principles be established and used? [closed]

Question Can higher order derivatives of momentum be useful in creating theories of dynamics if they have conservation principles? Even if they aren't needed, could it be done in theory? For ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

A question when using $E= - \nabla V$

This problem is from Problems and Solutions on Electromagnetism. A thin but very massive disc of insulator has surface charge density $\sigma$ and radius $R$. A point charge $+Q$ is on the axis of ...
1
vote
3answers
210 views

Time derivative of a function in Phase Space

Consider a function $\mathcal{H}(q_i,p_i;t)$ such that it obeys the equation: $$ \frac{d\mathcal{H}}{dt}=\frac{\partial\mathcal{H}}{\partial t}$$ What does this equation imply (read: mean), ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Mode expansions of fields

This is a very simple question but would appreciate it if someone could clarify - I've heard different things from different people so I'm a little bit confused yet the question is simple: Given the ...
2
votes
0answers
93 views

Supercovariant Derivative action

My query is with Weinberg Vol3 equation just above 26.7.22 Weinberg follows Majorana Superfield formalism. Where, covariant derivative is defined as, $$D_{R\alpha}=-\epsilon_{\alpha ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Variation of a tensor

Let a change of coordinates be given by $x^{\mu}\to x^{\mu '}=x^{\mu}+\varepsilon \xi^{\mu}(x)$ with epsilon a small quantity. Given a tensor $T$ we define $\delta T:=T'(x)-T(x)$. I guess this means ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Derivation Of Euler-Lagrange Equation [closed]

I want the proof of this relation in details, $$ \frac{\rm d}{{\rm d}t}\left(\frac{\partial\vec{r}_v}{\partial q_\alpha}\right)=\frac{\partial\vec{\dot{r}_v}}{\partial q_\alpha} $$
1
vote
3answers
132 views

What is the physical meaning of the Levi-Civita connection?

I'm taking a course in General Relativity and I have studied the fundamental theorem of Riemannian geometry: Let $M$ be a manifold with metric $g$. Then exists an unique torsion-free connection ...
1
vote
3answers
118 views

Is there any physical interpretation for $\nabla\cdot(\nabla \times F)=0$?

It is well known that the divergence of the curl is always 0. Mathematically I understand why this happens ($d^2=0$ where $d$ is the exterior derivative) but today I was wondering what is the physical ...
1
vote
2answers
94 views

Two different formulas

My problem is simple : given a particle of mass $m$, charge $q$ and velocity $\bf{v}$. If $\bf{A}$ denotes the magnetic potential satisfying $\bf{B}= \nabla \times \bf{A}$. I want to etablish the ...
24
votes
6answers
3k views

Why are Killing fields relevant in physics?

I'm taking a course on General Relativity and the notes that I'm following define a Killing vector field $X$ as those verifying: $$\mathcal{L}_Xg~=~ 0.$$ They seem to be very important in physics ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Force of Leaky Bucket over time

Indie Lab Procedure: I attached a cylindrical can to a force sensor. On the bottom of the can I drilled holes of various diameters. I then added a volume of water while collecting data from the force ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Local Coordinate Expressions for Lie Derivatives

I'm currently working through the math chapters of Norbert Straumann's book on General Relativity. I have trouble understanding the coordinate expression of the Lie derivative of a basis vector. The ...
2
votes
1answer
328 views

How is it possible to pull out derivatives of a wavefunction?

In an early derivation, the following equation was stated: $$\frac\partial{\partial t}\lvert\psi\rvert^2 = \frac{i\hbar}{2m}\biggl(\psi^*\frac{\partial^2\psi}{\partial x^2} - ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Why trajectories approach to origin tangent to the slower direction?

I am reading non-linear dynamics from Strogartz. Suppose, I have two solutions of a non linear system: $x(t) = x_0e^{at}$ and $y(t) = y_0e^{-t}$, where $a\in \mathbb{R}$. Now it is clear that,for ...
0
votes
3answers
119 views

Can a particle have no instantaneous velocity at all points of the path taken but a finite average velocity?

I have a question on kinematics. Say the path traced by a particle is given by a Koch curve or Koch snowflake. Now consider the particle starts from some arbitrary point $A$ on the curve and ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

Is resistance the gradient in a $V/I$ graph?

We have a circuit where there is a variable resistor, and we increase this resistance at a steady rate, while increasing current. Thus we have increasing voltage. The gradient is defined by $dy/dx$. ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Commutativity Variation and derivative

When in general is true that $\nabla_{\mu}\delta=\delta\nabla_{\mu}$ where $\nabla_{\mu}$ is covariant derivative? I was thinking this when one has to find the equations of motion for example in ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Full time-derivative, Poisson brackets and Hamilton's equations (classical mechanics)

While studying Poisson brackets in classical mechanics and the derivation of $\dot{q_j}=\{q_j,H\}$ and $\dot{p_j}=\{p_j,H\}$ form of Hamilton's equations I encountered a surpsing identity, which led ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Difference between $dM/dt = 0$ and $\partial M/\partial t=0$ [duplicate]

$\frac{dM}{dt} = 0$ represents a constant of motion $M.$ Why not $\frac{\partial M}{\partial t}$ represent a constant of motion $M$?
0
votes
0answers
45 views

A Lie derivative $\mathcal{L}_{\alpha^A}$ with respect to a spinor $\alpha^A$?

Suppose we work with Minkowski flat space $M$ (just to make things easy). If $\textbf X$ is a Killing vector field it is possible to define the Lie derivative of an spinor $\alpha^A$ with respect to ...
1
vote
1answer
212 views

Derivation of one-form/vector equation in Carroll confusion

I don't understand the derivation of Equation 2.14$$\mathrm{d}f\left(\frac{d}{d\lambda}\right)=\frac{df}{d\lambda} \tag{2.14}$$ in Carroll's Lecture Notes on General Relativity ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Covariant Derivative commutator on a Spinor [closed]

I am trying to prove 8.14 of Supergravity - Freedman. The equation that I am trying to show is $$\gamma^\mu \nabla_\mu \gamma^\nu \nabla_\nu \psi = (g^{\mu\nu}\nabla_\mu \nabla_\nu - ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Confirmation of Uncertainty in Indices New Formula? [closed]

I am experimenting relations with regards of the value with uncertainty raised to the $n$th power. I came up with this formula: $$(A\pm\alpha)^n=A^n\pm(A^{n-1}n\alpha)$$ Anyone here able to ...
1
vote
1answer
136 views

Gradient, divergence and curl with covariant derivatives

I am trying to do exercise 3.2 of Sean Carroll's Spacetime and geometry. I have to calculate the formulas for the gradient, the divergence and the curl of a vector field using covariant derivatives. ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

$\frac{d}{dr}=0$ and $\frac{d}{dz}=0$ (cylindrical coordinates) for a 1D ring

In http://ritchie.chem.ox.ac.uk/Grant%20Teaching/2010/Lecture%204%202010.pdf slide 21 of 26, he says "Radius of ring is fixed and so derivatives in $r$ are 0." Presumably this goes for ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

In central-force mechanics, how do we substitute $ξ=\frac{1}{r}$?

I have taken a look at central-force mechanics in the past, but I still cannot understand how $ξ=\frac{1}{r}$ is substituted to find $\frac{d^2r}{dt^2}$ in terms of ξ. So I know from $F=ma$ that: ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

What does the zero in the differential operator $\partial_0$ mean?

I have noticed the differential operator $\partial_0$ in a lot of equations whilst studying quantum field theory. I am used to the notation $\partial_x$ meaning $ \frac{d}{dx} \\\\ $ etc. but just a ...
-1
votes
1answer
76 views

To prove, $\nabla.(\nabla\phi \times \nabla\psi)$ =0 [closed]

Please Help me solving the problem using levi-cevita symbol : Prove That, $\nabla.(\nabla\phi \times \nabla\psi)$ =0 where $\phi =\phi(x,y,z)$ & $\psi=\psi(x,y,z)$
0
votes
4answers
128 views

Significance of curl ($\nabla\times\boldsymbol{V}$)

What is the physical significance of curl $$\nabla\times\boldsymbol{V}~?$$ I mean I read 'curl V represents the rotation of the vector $V$. My question what is it about the term ...
4
votes
4answers
183 views

Do $\vec r$ and $d \vec r$ have the same direction?

One question is bugging me for a long time but I couldn't make out anything nor could my friends. Here it goes: We know, $\vec r$ is regarded as the position vector. So we can say, $$\vec r \cdot\vec ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Clarification about some steps in the derivation of the Lie derivative (mechanics)

First of all, this question may seem to be undefined, because I'm not sure how to connect this (to me) newly introduced concept with the abstract notion of the Lie derivative. I'm not even sure if I ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Derive an equation related to magnetism [closed]

Solve the equations for $v_x$ and $v_y$ : $$m\frac{d({v_x)}}{dt} = qv_yB \qquad m\frac{d{(v_y)}}{dt} = -qv_xB$$ by differentiating them with respect to time to obtain two equations of the ...
1
vote
2answers
105 views

Gauge covariant derivative of a creation operator

Suppose we define the (gauge) covariant derivative or as $$\tilde{\nabla}=\nabla+ie\textbf{A},$$ where the vector potential $\textbf{A}$ has a matrix structure where only the diagonal has nonzero ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Evaluating derivatives with respect to certain vector axis

So, I am trying to work in Spherical coordinates. I have a predefined fixed axis, $\hat{v}_0$, so that $\alpha=\vec{r}.\hat{v}_0$ Now, I am interested in the following: \begin{equation} ...
1
vote
1answer
160 views

What is meant by 'probability of transition per unit time'?

Today I came across a term used by Feynman in his thirteenth lecture: 'probability per unit time' to go from $| 1\rangle$ to $|2\rangle$ while initially being at $|1\rangle$. This is the excerpt fom ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Trouble understanding Landau & Lifshitz writing about Lagrangians and Galilean Relativity [duplicate]

We have two inertial coordinate systems, $K'$ and $K$. $K$ is moving with infinitesimal velocity ${\epsilon}$ relative to $K'$. Using Galilean relativity we can transform this into $v'=v+{\epsilon}$. ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

Gradient one-form [duplicate]

I am trying to understand what gradient one-form means actually. In the book that I'm following (A first course on General Relativity by Schutz) it's told that gradient is a one-form and it's ...
3
votes
1answer
141 views

How is $ \frac{dv}{ dt} = a $?

I know how , in the physical sense - $$\frac {dv}{dt} = a$$ But, even after thinking a lot, I am not able to see the fault in this - $$\frac {dv}{dt} = \frac {d(st^{-1})}{dt} = \frac ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Derivatives with upper and lower indices

I'm studying classical and quantum field theory, but evaluating derivatives of fields (scalar and/or vector) described with upper and lower indices is somewhat new to me. I'm trying to evaluate ...
-1
votes
1answer
114 views

Differentiating displacement with respect to speed in order to obtain time

I have this problem where I am trying to calculate $d(t)$ and $v(t)$ of a mass m on a spring, dropped from a displacement $A$, without using anything else than Hooke's law and energy calculations. ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Connection between heat capacity and the derivative of enthalpy

One can define the heat capacity of isobaric processes as $$ c_P = \left( \frac{\partial H}{\partial T} \right)_P . $$ Now, we know that the unit of heat capacity is Joule per Kelvin, i.e., I need to ...
0
votes
2answers
94 views

What is the derivative of $\dot{\theta^2}$? [closed]

$$\frac{d}{dt}(\dot{\theta^2}) =? 2\dot{\theta}\ddot{\theta}$$ is this correct, or am I missing something?