Mathematical discipline which uses the techniques of calculus to study geometric problems. General relativity is written in this language.

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Geometric interpretation of zero metric

What is the geometric interpretation of a metric vanishing at a point on a Riemannian manifold? What does it look like locally in the case of a surface?
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2answers
244 views

Non-trivial scalar quantity

Is there any scalar quantity made of only the Christoffel symbols, determinant of a metric and tensors, not derivatives? In other words, can we construct a scalar quantity which cannot be written in ...
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1answer
84 views

Non-Euclidean mechanics; is it useful?

Special relativity has the following single-particle Lagrangian: $$S = \int_{t_0}^{t_f}\sqrt {\langle \mathrm d\vec{s},\mathrm d\vec{s}\rangle}.$$ Clearly it is based on Euclidean norms; it is in ...
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Is it known what the necessary and sufficient conditions are for the existence of a “3+1 split” (by means of a foliation) of a (Lorentzian) manifold?

When trying to do physics on a more general pseudo-Riemannian manifold we want to require that there is a foliation of this manifold into three-dimensional subspaces. By this I mean we would like to ...
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2answers
142 views

Why acceleration cannot vanish everywhere?

In attempt to introduce gr concepts When there are gravitational accelerations present, as for example in the gravitational field of the earth, the space cannot be the flat Minkowski space. Indeed, ...
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1answer
53 views

What happens if locally manifold is seen as an Euclidean space? [closed]

I have been trying to understand the definition of a manifold and I have found out that the most common definition can be paraphrased as: A manifold is a space that has a complex "topology" globally ...
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0answers
22 views

A problem with ADM mass in the derivation of 1st law of black hole thermodynamics

The definition of ADM mass is $M=\frac{1}{16\pi}\lim_{r\rightarrow\infty}\int(\frac{\partial h_{\mu\nu}}{\partial x^\mu}-\frac{\partial h_{\mu\mu}}{\partial x^\nu})N^\nu dA$ according to Wald. ...
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1answer
75 views

Components of dual vectors

(This is a close retelling of Wald, problem 2.4b. Not for homework; just curiosity and an increasingly alarming suspicion that I've never actually understood anything.) Let $Y_1 ... Y_n$ be a ...
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1answer
46 views

Divergence of inverse of metric tensor

I know that the Levi-civita connection preserves the metric tensor. Is the divergence of the inverse of metric tensor zero, too?! I'm not so familiar with the divergence of the second ranked tensor. ...
2
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1answer
117 views

Local translations in curved spacetime

A global Poincare transformation on a scalar field induces $$\delta(a, \lambda)\phi(x) = [a^{\mu}+\lambda^{\mu\nu}x_{\nu}]\partial_{\mu}\phi(x). \tag{11.46}$$ In curved spacetime we replace $a^{\mu} ...
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2answers
320 views

Locally flat coordinate and Locally inertial frame

I am having some doubts on myself regarding the above concepts in General Relativity. First, I want to point out how I understand them so far. A male observer follows a timelike worldline ($\gamma$) ...
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5answers
125 views

Local inertial frame

In general relativity we introduce local inertial frames to be such frames where the laws of special relativity holds. Let $\xi^{\alpha}$ the coordinates in the local inertial frame, so we get ...
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1answer
78 views

Duality and 1 forms

How is a dual map defined if we are talking about partial derivatives and 1 forms?
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1answer
168 views

New definition of gamma matrices?

It was mentioned in http://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/files/12371620/Studentthesis-Mehmet_Akyol_2013.pdf page 28, a new concept "oscillator basis" or more precisely the author defines gamma matrices of ...
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2answers
108 views

What does naturally mean here?

We often cross the sentence "Kahler geometry emerges naturally in sugra". I have always wondered what does this mean; actually what does naturally mean in that sentence?
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2answers
96 views

A manifold question: Why smooth functions and what is a Jacobian?

My question is what does a Jacobian have to do with the change of coordinates (coordinate transformation). Why do we care about this notion to start with? Also, why should it be non-singular?
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1answer
34 views

Metric components transformation under change of coordinates

I have been studying Lie derivatives and some applications. While searching the web I found a refence with the following statement: For a general Riemannian manifold $M$, take a tangent vector field ...
5
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1answer
133 views

How to measure Torsion and Non-metricity?

In General Relativity, we most often work with the Levi-Civita connection (metric and torsion-free). What kind of experiment can we make to be sure that our physical space-time indeed is torsion-free ...
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1answer
686 views

Spacetime Torsion, the Spin tensor, and intrinsic spin in Einstein-Cartan theory

In Einstein-Cartan gravity, the action is the usual Einstein-Hilbert action but now the Torsion tensor is allowed to vary as well (in usual GR, it is just set to zero). Variation with respect to the ...
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1answer
257 views

What are the mathematical models for force, acceleration and velocity?

In mechanics, the space can be described as a Riemann manifold. Forces, then, can be defined as vector fields of this manifold. Accelerations are linear functions of forces, so they are covector ...
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5answers
522 views

A reference frame is any coordinate system or just a set of Cartesian axes?

In Physics the idea of a reference frame is one important idea. In many texts I've seem, a reference frame is not defined explicitly, but rather there seems to be one implicit definition that a ...
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0answers
54 views

Are all spacetimes locally conformally flat?

No, is the answer. However, I am confused. Let $M$ be a (2+1) Lorentzian manifold (for simplicity) . Then the line element is given by : $ds^{2}=g_{\mu\nu}dx^\mu dx^\nu=−N^2 dt^2 + γ^{ij} (dx^i + ...
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1answer
111 views

What does $L^2(S^1,\mu_H)$ mean?

It's a Hilbert space, $\mu_H$ stands for the Haar measure on $U(1)$, but what does $S^1$ mean? I found it in one of my quantum mechanics books which approaches from a very 'mathematical' way.
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1answer
44 views

Transformation matrices for basis and coordinate transformation in non-orthonormal coordinates

The transformation matrices for covariant and contravariant vectors are different but in orthonormal coordinate system numerical values in matrices turn out to be same although in mathematical proof ...
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0answers
43 views

Does nature really follow the heat equation?

I think the heat equation says that the first derivative of temperature with respect to time in a stationary solid varies as the negative of the second derivative of temperature with respect to ...
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2answers
223 views

Symmetry of the Polyakov action?

Let us look at the Polyakov action for a string moving in a spacetime with metric $g_{\mu \nu}(X)$:$$S_P = -{1\over{4\pi \alpha'}} \int d^2 \sigma \sqrt{-\gamma} \gamma^{ab} \partial_a X^\mu ...
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2answers
93 views

Chern-Simons theory

The Chern-Simons 3-form is given by $\omega_3={\rm Tr} \left[ A\wedge dA+\frac{2}{3}A\wedge A\wedge A\right]$ where $A$ is a connection one-form in the adjoint representation of a non-Abelian gauge ...
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1answer
129 views

Generalized spin connection and dreibein in higher spin gravity

I am studying 3D higher spin gravity and I would like to know the mathematical and physical meaning of generalized spin connection and generalized dreibein that appear in this theory. It is well known ...
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1answer
418 views

What kind of object is the Landau--Lifshitz pseudotensor?

I understand that it's called a pseudotensor because it's not a tensor. Wikipedia says most pseudotensors are sections of jet bundles, which are perfectly valid objects in GR. ...
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1answer
164 views

If a point r lies in the boundary of the chronological future of another point p, why does the chronological future of r belong to that of p?

I am studying the global causality of the spacetime. Here, I come across a problem. Suppose a point $r\in \partial I^+(p)$. $I^+(p)$ is the chronological future of a different point $p$ in ...
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2answers
82 views

Maintaining symmetry? [closed]

Minkowski metric is found to be $$ds^2=-dt^2+dr^2+r^2d\Omega^2$$ where $d\Omega^2$ is the metric on a unit two-sphere. Why should we keep track of the $d\Omega^2$ so that spherical symmetry holds ...
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2answers
58 views

Computational advantages of various notations for electromagnetism [closed]

Most undergraduate electromagnetism classes and textbooks use vector notation to describe Maxwell's equations. However, there are other notations like differential geometry and geometric calculus ...
3
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1answer
147 views

How can I mathematically describe the parallel transport in the Roman soldiers example?

I've been trying to understand parallel transport. Many of the descriptions present a mathematical version: $\nabla_V X = 0$. And/or they present an example involving soldiers (usually Roman) ...
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4answers
504 views

Why does a bubble take a spherical shape?

I suspect this has something to do with thermodynamics and the isoperimetric inequality and I'm interested in a mathematical derivation of this result.
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2answers
385 views

Derivation of the Riemann tensor confusion

I'm trying to understand the derivation of the Riemann curvature tensor as given in Foster and Nightingale's A Short Course In General Relativity, p. 102. They start by giving the covariant derivative ...
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1answer
79 views

Intuitive meaning of Globally Hyperbolic

I am been studying differential geometry and spacetime and I keep coming across the term globally hyperbolic. I am having a hard time coming up with an intuitive understanding of this idea. What is an ...
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1answer
97 views

Einstein tensor of a gravitational source

In section 4.4 of gravitational radiation chapter in Wald's general relativity, eq.4.4.49 shows the far-field generated by a variable mass quadrupole: $$ \gamma_{\mu \nu}(t,r)=\frac{2}{3R} \frac{d^2 ...
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2answers
66 views

Two ways of writing coordinate basis vectors confusion

In Schutz's A First Course in General Relativity (p122) he derives the polar coordinate basis vector$$\vec{e_{r}}=\frac{\partial x}{\partial r}\vec{e_{x}}+\frac{\partial y}{\partial r}\vec{e_{y}.}$$ ...
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1answer
92 views

Weyl scalar calculation

I'm trying to compute Weyl scalars, but don't really understand the formulae for them, in the sense I don't understand how to compute them. Let's take ...
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6answers
255 views

In GR, why should the spacetime manifold be differentiable?

In general relativity (GR), spacetime is viewed as a differentiable manifold of dimension $D$ with a metric of Lorentzian signature $(-,+,+,...,+)$. My question is why differentiable?
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1answer
76 views

How should Christoffel symbols be written (in LaTeX)? [closed]

I'm writing a summary of a lecture on relativity, and we've recently introduced the Christoffel symbols. It seems that the upstairs indices are the "leftmost" and the downstairs indices are somewhat ...
2
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1answer
93 views

Derivation of Schwarzschild metric using the full machinery of differential geometry [closed]

How would one derive the Schwarzschild metric using the full machinery of differential geometry, using the component approach as little as possible? Something along these lines: Begin with a manifold ...
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2answers
71 views

What does coordinate invariance mean?

I would like to really understand what the mathematical as well as Physical meaning of coordinate invariance is. I have pretended to know what this means, but upon thinking a little harder today, I am ...
0
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2answers
75 views

What is the metric tensor for?

I am wondering how to use the metric tensor, in practice? I read the book and done the exercises in A student's guide to vectors and tensors by Dan Fleisch. The concept of a tensor and their ...
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0answers
28 views

Weyl Transformations and Group actions [migrated]

I have the following question. Let $(M,g_{ab})$ be a Riemannian manifold $M$ with metric $g$, and with an action of a Lie group $G$. Moreover, the Riemannian metric $g_{ab}$ is taken to be invariant ...
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1answer
27 views

Inverse gauge transformation in general relativity [closed]

Can someone explain to me how (8.21) follows from (8.20). The Picture comes from A first course in general relativity (Schutz). Thanks and regards, Jens Wagemaker
3
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3answers
494 views

Clarifying what metric counts as flat space

In (2D) Cartesian coordinates, the Euclidean metric... $$\begin{bmatrix} 1 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \end{bmatrix}$$ ...is flat space. If the diagonal elements are exchanged for other real numbers ...
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2answers
165 views

Timelike Boundary

I was reading in a paper (see 1st paragraph of introduction section in http://arxiv.org/pdf/1510.00709.pdf) that in AdS space, waves can reach the boundary in finite time and, since said boundary is ...
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1answer
101 views

Why pseudo-Riemannian metric cannot define a topology?

It is not clear for me why a positive definite metric is necessary to define a topology as noted in some textbooks like the one by Carroll. Does this imply that in cosmology, say through FLRW metric, ...
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1answer
78 views

Time independent Kerr metric

The Kerr metric expressed in terms of polar coordinates $r,\theta,\phi$, such that $x = r\sin(\theta)\cos(\phi)$, $y = r\sin(\theta)\sin(\phi)$, $z = r\cos(\theta)$. Then the Kerr metric is given as ...