Mathematical discipline which uses the techniques of calculus to study geometric problems. General relativity is written in this language.

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1answer
42 views

Meaning of “physical” and “gravitational” metrics

I've recently been reading some notes (following a paper by J.D. Bekenstein, titled "The Relation between Physical and Gravitational Geometry": http://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/9211017) on alternative ...
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0answers
53 views

What's the nature of entanglement? [closed]

Since there are so many results revealing the relation between entanglement and geometry, such as the construction of spacetime from entanglement, ER bridge and entanglement/complexity, geometrical ...
-1
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0answers
23 views

Directional derivative of the Ricci scalar in the direction of a Killing vector field

Do I need the Levi-Civita connection for the directional derivative in the direction of a Killing vector field of there curvature scalar to be 0? EDIT: Let $K$ be a Killing vector field and $R$ the ...
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0answers
30 views

Null geodesic equation with affine parameters [duplicate]

A photon's geodesic equation is defined by re-parameterizing the geodesic equation to some parameter other than proper time. This is done because $ds=0$ for the photon. Again if we use affine ...
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0answers
46 views

How would you describe what the affine parameter is in layman's terms? [duplicate]

I've been trying to learn it from other sites, but I'm not well-versed enough in mathematics to understand.
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1answer
51 views

Derivation of geodesic deviation equation from two neighbouring geodesics

I'm stuck trying to follow Foster and Nightingale's derivation of the geodesic equation from two neighbouring geodesics $x^{a}\left(u\right)$ and $\tilde{x}^{a}\left(u\right)$ joined by a ...
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1answer
36 views

Help with proving a relation

I am trying to see if the following relation, \begin{equation} \frac 12 g_{ij}\frac{d^2\eta}{du^2}+\frac 12 g_{ij}\frac{d\eta }{du}+\frac 12 \frac{\partial g_{ij}}{\partial x^j}\frac ...
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1answer
38 views

How to approach proofs in Electricity and Magnitism that involve integrals?

I have read through both Franklin and Jackson's Electromagnetism books and I am able to understand the different proofs involving integrals but when I try to re-derive them on my own later I am always ...
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120 views
+50

Why are the quantum observables defined on opens sets a presheaf and not a sheaf?

In local quantum field theory or AQFT one can mathematically describe over each open set $U$ of a spacetime $M$ the quantum states or observables of the theory. This structure is commonly referred as ...
2
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1answer
78 views

Classical conformal invariance

So I am trying to understand classical conformal invariance. So we move gently from general coordinate invariance to Weyl invariance to conformal invariance, and now they start out with this thing ...
6
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1answer
177 views

Non-trivial scalar quantity

Is there any scalar quantity made of only the Christoffel symbols, determinant of a metric and tensors, not derivatives? In other words, can we construct a scalar quantity which cannot be written in ...
2
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1answer
136 views

Spin connection and covariant derivative

How to prove explicitly (i.e., to don't postulate it) that by including Lorentz indices $a$ the covariant derivative $D_{\mu}$ looks like $$ D_{\mu}A^{\nu a} = \partial_{\mu}A^{\nu a} + ...
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0answers
36 views

Do we have a generalization of natural connection on quaternionic Hopf fibration? [closed]

For the quaternionic Hopf fibrations, $S^3\rightarrow S^7\rightarrow S^4$, we have a natural BPST connection form. Do we have some generalization of it? For example, the 'natural' connection form on ...
2
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0answers
38 views

Classical Statistical thermodynamics phase space and residue $h$

In classical statistical mechanics we have to divide the partition function by a factor of $1/h^n$. In almost every calculation of a real quantity this cancels out and is thought to be a remnant of ...
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0answers
24 views

Still about the diameter of a Riemannian manifold on $SU(2^n)$ with negative curvature

My exact problem is a Riemannian manifold defined on $SU(2^n)$, where the metric is defined as follows: If $U(t)$ is a curve so that $U′(t)=−iH(t)U(t)$, we can defined a metric at $U(t)$ as ...
2
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3answers
125 views

General relativity without curvature?

Is there a reformulation of general relativity without curved space time, just with fields (like classical E&M)? Edit: removed the part about E&M with curvature (multiple posts).
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0answers
30 views

How is the Routhian of classical mechanics defined?

The Hamiltonian is a function on the cotangent bundle to a configuration manifold $H:T^*M\rightarrow \mathbb R$. The Lagrangian is a function on the tangent bundle to the configuration manifold ...
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0answers
35 views

Diameter of manifold with negative curvature

Are there any results (papers/books) on this problem? I am working on a finite dimensional Riemannian manifold which has a negative curvature almost everywhere. But I do not know if such kind of ...
2
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0answers
44 views

Diameter of the space of unitary operation manifold for quantum computation?

I am considering the unitary operation manifold for quantum computation. In order to examine the computational complexity of an algorithm using n qubits, we need to define the complexity of a certain ...
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3answers
103 views

Can we say that gravity(indirectly) is responsible for motion of electrons around nucleus? [closed]

From Wikipedia But because general relativity dictates that the presence of electromagnetic fields (or energy/matter in general) induce curvature in spacetime From Wikipedia An ...
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1answer
62 views
2
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1answer
121 views

Divergence Theorem, mathematical approach to Gauss's Law?

Let $D$ be a compact region in $\mathbb{R}^3$ with a smooth boundary $S$. Assume $0 \in \text{Int}(D)$. If an electric charge of magnitude $q$ is placed at $0$, the resulting force field is ...
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1answer
71 views

In field theory, why are some symmetry transformations applied to the field values while other act on the space that the fields are defined on?

My basic understanding is that a field theory consists of symmetry groups, a space $S$ that the symmetry groups act on and of fields defined on that space $S$. In other words, the space $S$ is the ...
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0answers
27 views

Can $S^4$ be the cotangent bundle of a manifold? [migrated]

I am asking the question because in the classical mechanics book by Arnold, he states that there is a distinguished 1-form on $T^*V $. It seems that there is no such distinguished 1-form on a general ...
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1answer
59 views

New “oscillator basis” of gamma matrices?

It was mentioned in http://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/files/12371620/Studentthesis-Mehmet_Akyol_2013.pdf page 28, a new concept "oscillator basis" or more precisely the author defines gamma matrices of ...
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0answers
20 views

Construct bivariate symmetric (polynomial) Hilbert-Schmidt two-qubit volume functions over the unit square with certain properties

Construct bivariate symmetric polynomials (two-qubit volume functions) f(r,R) = f(R,r) >= 0 over [0,1]^2, with f(1,R) = f(r,1)=0, such that the univariate marginal (integrating over r or R) ...
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4answers
480 views

If gravitation is due to space-time curvature, how can a body free-fall in a straight line?

According to general relativity, Gravity is due to space-time curvature. Then all paths must be curved. If so, how can there be any straight line motion? The body must follow a curved path. So, there ...
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1answer
143 views

What is the covariant basis around a Schwarzschild black hole? [closed]

First of all, I'm not interested in time for this question. So lets consider a 3-manifold whose metric is the spatial part of the Schwarzschild metric, so it has the event horizon and the singularity ...
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0answers
48 views

Riemannian generalization of Weierstrass transform

As it has been written on this Wikipedia page, one can define the Weierstrass transform on any Riemannian manifold. Even though, I couldn't find any references guess that the Weierstrass transform on ...
4
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1answer
243 views

Is there a nice way to write Navier-Stokes equations in exterior calculus

I'm considering to study some high-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. One problem is to do write the viscous equation for vorticity, helicity and other conserved quantities. I think it might be ...
1
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1answer
134 views

Distributions (generalized functions) over manifolds

I have asked a similar question on the math stackexchange website, but since this type of question might have an answer that is known to physicists better than mathematicians I'm posting the question ...
3
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1answer
110 views

What do physicists mean by ${g^{i}}_j$?

Maybe this is an idiot question, but in relativity I see a lot of ${g^{i}}_j$ for a metric tensor $g$. Is this just $$\delta^i_j ~=~ g(dx^i \sharp, \partial_{ x^j})~?$$
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38 views

Configurations and configuration manifold in Lagrangian Optics

In Classical Mechanics, given a certain system of particles it is possible to consider the configuration manifold $Q$ which is a differentiable manifold whose points are possible configurations of the ...
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6answers
596 views

Is there a physical interpretation of a tensor as a vector with additional qualities?

What is a tensor? has been asked before, with the most highly up-voted answer defining a tensor of rank $k$ as a vector of a tensor of rank $k-1$. But if a scalar is defined as a physical quantity ...
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0answers
17 views

Any good reference on Maslov index (or Morse index)?

Any good reference on Maslov index (or Morse index)? I have some basic knowledge of differential geometry, calculus of variation. So is there any good reference for me?
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0answers
49 views

Covariant derivative and tensor symmetries [migrated]

Suppose we have a tensor field $T^{ab}$ such that $T^{ab} = T^{ba}$ everywhere. Then from the definition of the Riemannian covariant derivative in terms of a map between tensors, why must we then have ...
2
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0answers
38 views

Foliation of the phase space

Consider an arbitrary classical Hamiltonian system. Given an initial state $(p_0, q_0)$, we can get a solution of the equation of motion, a curve in the phase space. Now the problem is, for a generic ...
2
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1answer
177 views

Null geodesic equation

For a null geodesic curve $X^i$, $$0=g_{ij}V^iV^j.$$ When we derive the geodesic equation from E-L equations, will this affine parametrization cause it to blow up? How is it justified to use the ...
6
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7answers
1k views

Physical meaning of non-trivial solutions of vacuum Einstein's field equations

According to Einstein, the space-time is curved and the origin of the curvature is the presence of matter i.e. the presence of the energy-momentum tensor $T_{ab}$ in Einstein's field equations. If our ...
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1answer
78 views

Geometric meaning of spin connection

A very short question: Does the spin connection that we encounter in General Relativity $$\omega_{\mu,ab}$$ have a geometric meaning? I am supposing it does because it comes from mathematical terms ...
3
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1answer
374 views

Instantons in Witten's supersymmetry and Morse theory

I'm reading Witten's paper on supersymmetry and Morse theory and am confused about the details of the instanton calculation which he uses to define a Morse complex (beginning at page 11 of the pdf) . ...
5
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0answers
129 views

Intuitively what's the relationship between forces and connections?

In Einstein's General Relativity we relate the effects of gravity with the curvature of the Levi-Civita connection on the spacetime manifold. Also, when we get the electromagnetic tensor $F = dA$ ...
8
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1answer
142 views

Lagrangian formalism and Contact Bundles

In his Applied Differential Geometry book, William Burke says the following after telling that the action should be the integral of a function $L$: A line integral makes geometric sense only if ...
5
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1answer
110 views

How is foliation of manifolds' theory useful in General Relativity?

I am interested on getting some hints on how Foliations Theory of Manifolds can be used fruitfully on General Relativity. I just started my Ph.D on Mathematics this semester focusing on studying ...
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1answer
153 views

What are the mathematical models for force, acceleration and velocity?

In mechanics, the space can be described as a Riemann manifold. Forces, then, can be defined as vector fields of this manifold. Accelerations are linear functions of forces, so they are covector ...
2
votes
2answers
86 views

What coordinate systems allows the magnitude of the basis vectors to change with position?

I'm familiar with coordinate systems where the direction of the basis vectors changes with position, but I haven't come across any where the relative magnitude of the basis vectors themselves are ...
2
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1answer
65 views

Infinite dimensional manifolds in general relativity [closed]

In GR the concept of a manifold is very useful. However, all of these manifolds are of finite dimension. Is it possible to define a manifold with infinite dimension (ie much like Hilbert space in QM) ...
3
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1answer
88 views

Hermiticity of Dirac operator in curved spacetime

The Dirac Lagrangian in curved spacetime is usually given by \begin{equation} \mathcal{L} = i\bar{\Psi}\gamma^a e^{\mu}_a(\partial_\mu + \frac{1}{4}\omega_{\mu bc}\gamma^b\gamma^c)\Psi \end{equation} ...
5
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3answers
332 views

Confusion about 1-forms as introduced in “Gravitation” (Kip S. Thorne,…)

In the book Gravitation in chapter 2, paragraph 5, they introduce the concept of 1-forms by thinking about the momentum 4-vector differently. They first introduce the de Broglie 1-form as follows (I ...
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0answers
61 views

Taking squares or square roots of differential forms?

Reading the recent paper Loop Integrands from the Riemann Sphere by Yvonne Geyer, Lionel Mason, Ricardo Monteiro and Piotr Tourkine I noticed that the authors occasionally seem to take squares and ...