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16
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2answers
2k views

Norton's dome and its equation

Norton's dome is the curve $$h(r) = -\frac{2}{3g} r ^{3/2}.$$ Where $h$ is the height and $r$ is radial arc distance along the dome. The top of the dome is at $h = 0$. Via Norton's web. If we put ...
5
votes
2answers
515 views

Is it really impossible to calculate in advance the result of throwing dice?

Is it really impossible to calculate in advance the result of throwing dice? After all, the physics of dice throwing is in the world of classical mechanics, rather than quantum mechanics.
2
votes
3answers
92 views

Radioactive decay - What mechanism decides when an unstable nucleus decays?

My first question on Stackexchange (if it is formatted wrong or something please tell me so I know in future) - here it is: Given an unstable nucleus (exactly which nucleus is not particularly ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Is quantum indeterministic? [duplicate]

The question might look clear from a viewpoint of a non-physics guy but let me be more specific. Can we say quantum leaps or waves or maybe the universe itself are completely indeterministic or do ...
1
vote
2answers
82 views

Is the mechanics of the wave function in the quantum mechanics deterministic?

Is possible a non-deterministic propagation of the wave function in the QM?
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Question on the logical structure of the EPR argument and Bell's inequalities

Recently I have read a lot online about the EPR argument and Bell's inequalities and its implications. When comparing what people write there online with the actual research articles of Einstein and ...
13
votes
5answers
2k views

Is the future already determined?

I've always wondered (and was re-inspired to explore further from these two videos) that if at a single point of time we know about the complete state (position, momentum, spins, everything.) of every ...
1
vote
2answers
110 views

Could the universe have evolved WITHOUT the non-determinism of quantum mechanics? [closed]

(I'm going to make a few conjectures here - please answer the question in light of them as if they were true, even though of course they may be overly simplistic or wrong) Assuming that: the ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Do randomness and indeterminacy in Quantum Physics mean the same?

I have been trying to learn about the randomness in Quantum Physics. But of the many sources I referred to, some say about "Randomness in Quantum physics" and some others say about "Quantum ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

Chaos theory and determinism

My professor in class went a little over chaos theory, and basically said that Newtonian determinism no longer applies, since as time goes to infinity, no matter how close together two initial points ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Uncertainty principle implies the non-deterministic universe? [duplicate]

Does the uncertainty principle imply the non-deterministic universe, or just the fact that our model of the universe, the one based on observation, can be at most non-deterministic, since we will not ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

From where randomness comes from and why it exists? [closed]

I recently began to study statistics and probability and I have two questions: Where does randomness come from? What is the source of randomness? Why does the randomness exist? Is it possible to ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

Uncertainty Principle tricked - so why not Newtonian Determinism?

Recently I read that some results are obtained in directions of tricking the uncertainty principle. The relevant link is here: http://www.caltech.edu/content/tricking-uncertainty-principle , and the ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Modeling Quantum Aspects with Probability

This is a question I've had a while about quantum theory. Many times when I look at books and equations about this subject matter I see that the use many concepts in probability. (Correct me if Im ...
7
votes
1answer
298 views

Cellular automata rules for quantum mechanics

My limited understanding of quantum theory is that a quantum system is completely described by its wave function, which deterministically evolves according to Schrödinger's equation until wave ...
3
votes
1answer
79 views

How does determinism manifest out of QFT?

Classical electrodynamics is deterministic. QED is indeterministic, or probabilistically random. Yet they agree with each other? What am I missing?
3
votes
1answer
114 views

What is the motivation for introducing “ontological state” in 't Hooft's deterministic quantum mechanics

I tried to read Prof. 't Hooft's new paper The Cellular Automaton Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics A View on the Quantum Nature of our Universe, Compulsory or Impossible? and encountered difficulty ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

determinism, and quantum computing

It might seem logical to presume that the exact state of the world around us could have been predicted given a big enough computer to analyse all the particle's interactions and what not. Determinism ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

How would we perceive time going backwards? [closed]

I haven't taken Physics in University. Lately, I've been reading about some of the branches of physics through Wikipedia. I read several times that many of the theoretical models do not explain why ...
25
votes
11answers
6k views

Discreteness and Determinism in Superstrings?

So Gerard 't Hooft has a brand new paper (thanks to Mitchell Porter for making me aware of it) so this is somewhat of a expansion to the question I posed on this site a month or so ago regarding 't ...
0
votes
0answers
58 views

Does causality alone resolve the mathematical ambiguity of expressing physical systems?

Newton's 2nd law of motion is most often written in the differential form $\sum F = {dp \over dt} $ but can also be expressed in an integral form $ p = \int\sum F dt $ Each form of expressing ...
0
votes
3answers
117 views

Chaos theory deterministic or non-deterministic?

While i was studying about chaos theory, i stumbled upon this, When a ball confined in a square, and at the center is located a circle, is to bounce elastically, the path of the object deviates ...
-9
votes
1answer
113 views

Are there any causeless phenomena from the mainstream physical viewpoint? [closed]

EDIT: The orginal version did not produce any answers about physics. I know what life is, I have studied that for decades. I wanted to hear how the border between matter and spirit looks from the ...
7
votes
2answers
364 views

Why was quantum mechanics regarded as a non-deterministic theory?

It seems to be a wide impression that quantum mechanics is not deterministic, e.g. the world is quantum-mechanical and not deterministic. I have a basic question about quantum mechanics itself. A ...
20
votes
6answers
3k views

Why is superdeterminism generally regarded as a joke? [closed]

Before anything, I'm sorry for being an outsider coming to opine about your field. This is almost always a stupid decision, but I do have a good justification for this case. I've been reading about ...
18
votes
10answers
1k views

Why can't the outcome of a QM measurement be calculated a-priori?

Quantum Mechanics is very successful in determining the overall statistical distribution of many measurements of the same process. On the other hand, it is completely clueless in determining the ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

A meaningful distinction between determinism and causality

Causality is generally accepted to be a fundamental physical principle. But quantum mechanics is acausal (e.g. there is no 'why' as to the result of a measurement of the position of a particle in an ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

If I drop a leaf twice from the height of a tree in a completely controlled environment, will the trajectory in each case be the same?

Putting my question in other words, can earth form again if a similar initial universe condition is given? The uncertainty principle says that we cannot tell with certainty the position of a particle ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

multibody problem and determinism

Given that there is no exact general solution to the $N$-body problem, can it be concluded that the Universe is non-deterministic, even for the Newtonian case (ignoring relativistic and quantum ...
3
votes
2answers
293 views

Determinism loophole?

I was thinking about the question I posted yesterday, and I thought of a better way to ask it. I'm trying to figure out why QM necessitates "pure randomness". Assume you have a photon that has a ...
9
votes
0answers
116 views

Why is QM maximally predictive?

Let's suppose I'm in the lab and I claim that I can predict more than QM can, specifically, I can predict exactly at which moment in time a particle decays. You don't believe me (naturally) so I set ...
26
votes
5answers
3k views

Is Stephen Wolfram's NKS, an attempt to explain the universe with cellular automata, in conflict with Bell's Theorem?

Stephen Wolfram's A New Kind of Science (NKS) hit the bookstores in 2002 with maximum hype. His thesis is that the laws of physics can be generated by various cellular automata--simple programs ...
5
votes
2answers
249 views

Why is classical mechanics determinism based on position and momentum only and not forces and scattering rules?

Consider a closed system (say a box) of $n$ particles. There is a well-known idiom/meme/law in classical mechanics that says that the position and momentum of those $n$ particles is all that is needed ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

Does the future already exist? If so, which one?

In the NOVA Fabric of the Cosmos program, Brian Greene explains a theory in which there is no "now", or more specifically, now is relative. He describes an alien riding a bicycle on a far off planet ...
4
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0answers
83 views

Free Will Theorem question

The Kochen-Specker Theorem says, if I understand it correctly, that the results of spin measurements cannot be predetermined independent of measurement. They get to this conclusion by describing 33 ...
5
votes
1answer
156 views

Why must allowable physical laws have reversibility?

I'm watching Susskind's video lectures and he says in the first lecture on classical mechanics that for a physical law to be allowable in classical mechanics it must be reversible, in the sense that ...
2
votes
2answers
200 views

Is inflation deterministic?

In some theories inflation is supposed to be able to turn quantum fluctuations into macroscopic inhomogeneities. I don't understand how an isolated system such as the universe can undergo such a ...
18
votes
5answers
4k views

Why do people rule out local hidden variables?

I bet the automatic response to my question would be "Bell's theorem" and of course I am not disputing Bell's proof. I am however uncertain of one of his assumptions. The so called "no conspiracy" ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

Are all natural processes that are bigger than a molecule also deterministic? [closed]

Is there something bigger than a molecule and still random in nature? I know that the decay of an unstable atom cannot be predicted, only the probability of decay can be calculated. Molecules moving ...
4
votes
3answers
200 views

Does the uncertainty principle make simulation of systems impossible?

Is it possible to fully define a system, then be incapable of simulating or calculating its future states due to the Uncertainty Principle? If it can be done, how?
2
votes
3answers
119 views

What are the borders of determinism?

I, a newbie in physics, often read about "near determinism", which is most probably the actual state of physics, meaning: the "big world" is deterministic, but very small things (atoms and smaller) ...
42
votes
3answers
20k views

Is the universe fundamentally deterministic?

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this question. I realise that this maybe a borderline philosophical question at this point in time, therefore feel free to close this question if you ...
3
votes
1answer
161 views

How would one test the hypothesis of human free will? [closed]

In this context, I define free will to mean that a human's high-level actions (not the quantum states of his particles) are not determined, in the same sense that some quantum effects are not ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Is the universe immediately dependent upon the past? [duplicate]

Given complete knowledge of the precise state of every property of every particle and energy phenomenon existing in our universe for a given infinitely small frame of time, is it possible to ...
8
votes
4answers
961 views

By what mechanism do quantum effects become observable in normal life at the macroscopic level?

By what mechanism do quantum effects become observable in normal life at the macroscopic level? For instance, when two molecules "collide" is the momentum a probabilistic event wherein the end state ...
2
votes
2answers
716 views

Are random quantum phenomena happening without a cause?

In everyday life, most of us assumes every event and object has a cause in some sense. I am wondering if the same is true for quantum physics. Does the random nature of quantum phenomena mean they ...
10
votes
1answer
500 views

What are the 't Hooft papers about classical models underlying QM?

Gerard 't Hooft states on his webpage: I have mathematically sound equations that show how classical models generate quantum mechanics. Also, there are some interesting discussions here on ...
1
vote
2answers
242 views

What are the *necessary* conditions to deterministic chaos?

What are the necessary conditions (not saying sufficient conditions) in mathematical terms that a deterministic dynamic system can transit to deterministic chaos? We collected yet: A positive ...
3
votes
2answers
389 views

What are the principles of deterministic chaos?

I see in literature very different (and chaotic) descriptions of what is deterministic chaos. Can you explain to me based in a type of formal definition, which principles need to be exactly fulfilled ...
3
votes
3answers
963 views

Can superdeterminism resolve contextuality, entanglement and Shor's algorithm in quantum mechanics?

Superdeterminism is the idea that the apparent freedom for the choice of experimental apparatuses and their settings are nothing but an illusion. Contextuality is the dependence of the properties of a ...