12
votes
5answers
2k views

Is the future already determined?

I've always wondered (and was re-inspired to explore further from these two videos) that if at a single point of time we know about the complete state (position, momentum, spins, everything.) of every ...
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Do randomness and indeterminacy in Quantum Physics mean the same?

I have been trying to learn about the randomness in Quantum Physics. But of the many sources I referred to, some say about "Randomness in Quantum physics" and some others say about "Quantum ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Uncertainty principle implies the non-deterministic universe? [duplicate]

Does the uncertainty principle imply the non-deterministic universe, or just the fact that our model of the universe, the one based on observation, can be at most non-deterministic, since we will not ...
2
votes
1answer
100 views

From where randomness comes from and why it exists? [closed]

I recently began to study statistics and probability and I have two questions: Where does randomness come from? What is the source of randomness? Why does the randomness exist? Is it possible to ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Modeling Quantum Aspects with Probability

This is a question I've had a while about quantum theory. Many times when I look at books and equations about this subject matter I see that the use many concepts in probability. (Correct me if Im ...
3
votes
1answer
84 views

What is the motivation for introducing “ontological state” in 't Hooft's deterministic quantum mechanics

I tried to read Prof. 't Hooft's new paper The Cellular Automaton Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics A View on the Quantum Nature of our Universe, Compulsory or Impossible? and encountered difficulty ...
6
votes
2answers
305 views

Why was quantum mechanics regarded as a non-deterministic theory?

It seems to be a wide impression that quantum mechanics is not deterministic, e.g. the world is quantum-mechanical and not deterministic. I have a basic question about quantum mechanics itself. A ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

A meaningful distinction between determinism and causality

Causality is generally accepted to be a fundamental physical principle. But quantum mechanics is acausal (e.g. there is no 'why' as to the result of a measurement of the position of a particle in an ...
20
votes
6answers
3k views

Why is superdeterminism generally regarded as a joke? [closed]

Before anything, I'm sorry for being an outsider coming to opine about your field. This is almost always a stupid decision, but I do have a good justification for this case. I've been reading about ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

If I drop a leaf twice from the height of a tree in a completely controlled environment, will the trajectory in each case be the same?

Putting my question in other words, can earth form again if a similar initial universe condition is given? The uncertainty principle says that we cannot tell with certainty the position of a particle ...
3
votes
2answers
286 views

Determinism loophole?

I was thinking about the question I posted yesterday, and I thought of a better way to ask it. I'm trying to figure out why QM necessitates "pure randomness". Assume you have a photon that has a ...
9
votes
0answers
99 views

Why is QM maximally predictive?

Let's suppose I'm in the lab and I claim that I can predict more than QM can, specifically, I can predict exactly at which moment in time a particle decays. You don't believe me (naturally) so I set ...
4
votes
0answers
78 views

Free Will Theorem question

The Kochen-Specker Theorem says, if I understand it correctly, that the results of spin measurements cannot be predetermined independent of measurement. They get to this conclusion by describing 33 ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

Are all natural processes that are bigger than a molecule also deterministic? [closed]

Is there something bigger than a molecule and still random in nature? I know that the decay of an unstable atom cannot be predicted, only the probability of decay can be calculated. Molecules moving ...
2
votes
3answers
115 views

What are the borders of determinism?

I, a newbie in physics, often read about "near determinism", which is most probably the actual state of physics, meaning: the "big world" is deterministic, but very small things (atoms and smaller) ...
4
votes
3answers
192 views

Does the uncertainty principle make simulation of systems impossible?

Is it possible to fully define a system, then be incapable of simulating or calculating its future states due to the Uncertainty Principle? If it can be done, how?
2
votes
2answers
646 views

Are random quantum phenomena happening without a cause?

In everyday life, most of us assumes every event and object has a cause in some sense. I am wondering if the same is true for quantum physics. Does the random nature of quantum phenomena mean they ...
7
votes
2answers
330 views

Why were the fathers of quantum mechanics so sure radioactive decay was indeterministic?

The classic example of an indeterministic system is a radioactive isotope, e.g. the one that kills Schrödinger's cat. I get there are arguments against hidden variables in quantum mechanics, but how ...
2
votes
2answers
197 views

Is everything pre-decided? [closed]

"There is nowhere in the universe where the laws of physics are violated." Considering this general to be true,can i conclude that everything is pre-decided? I can explain this in the following ...
0
votes
2answers
184 views

Can deterministic world view be denied by anything other than quantum mechanics

If we ignored quantum mechanics and looked at the world with a deterministic Newtonian view. Does not that mean that there is no randomness and that if all the information of the state of the universe ...
42
votes
3answers
20k views

Is the universe fundamentally deterministic?

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this question. I realise that this maybe a borderline philosophical question at this point in time, therefore feel free to close this question if you ...
7
votes
7answers
593 views

Why Quantum Mechanics as a non-fundamental effective theory?

My question: What (physical or mathematical) reasons (not philosophical) do some physicists ('t Hooft, Penrose, Smolin,...) argue/have in order to think that Quantum Mechanics could be substituted by ...
7
votes
3answers
623 views

Determinism, classical probabilities, and/or quantum mechanics?

[I]f you want a universe with certain very generic properties, you seem forced to one of three choices: (1) determinism, (2) classical probabilities, or (3) quantum mechanics. [My emphasis.] ...
2
votes
5answers
302 views

How do we know that there isn't a classical solution to the measurement problem/Quantum Mechanical uncertainty?

It was mentioned to me that it can be shown that there is no classical explanation for the uncertainty in Quantum Mechanics -- i.e. that there are no hidden workings that we have just not yet seen, ...
6
votes
2answers
199 views

Bell's Theorem graph

My friends and I got into an argument about determinism, and I brought up that quantum events are random. But I couldn't prove it. I found the Wikipedia page on Bell's theorem, which seems to imply ...
4
votes
4answers
363 views

Are photons deterministic?

I propose the following scenario: At $t=0$, a photon is emitted from a star. At $t=n$, said photon is received and interpreted by some detector. My question is whether or not it is accurate to say ...
14
votes
3answers
673 views

Does quantum computing rely on particular interpretations of quantum mechanics?

It is my understanding that quantum computing relies on quantum superposition and entanglement to work--qbits must exist in all states simultaneously before giving a particular result when observed. ...
1
vote
2answers
678 views

Is the movement of electrons truly random?

The result of rolling dice is considered pseudo-random because it depends on an almost endless list of factors (how you roll it, the terrain it lands on, etc.), but it is not TRULY random. Is the ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

reversible cellular automata

Let's suppose a cellular automaton has a value $b(r,t)$ belongs to $Q$ at site $r$ and time $t$, where $Q$ is the set of possible states at each site. Let $N(r, t)$ be the values of the states of all ...
0
votes
2answers
218 views

What are hidden variables exactly?

What are hidden variables in quantum mechanics? I am aware there are many types but what exactly do they mean or even "do" exactly? Do they mean that the quantum indeterminacy becomes hidden but ...
3
votes
3answers
354 views

Are quantum mechanics and determinism actually irreconcilable? [closed]

As a preface, I am not a physicist. I'm simply interested in abstract physics and fundamental principles of the universe and such. As such, if you can provide an answer for the layman (as ...
2
votes
2answers
453 views

Is 't Hooft's Determinism based on the holographic principle?

Does 't Hooft's determinism work need the holographic principle in order to work or is it just an extension of his work?
-3
votes
1answer
386 views

Quantum superposition and fate [closed]

First of all, sorry for my knowledge of physics. Maybe my question is too obvious but I want to ask it. I am thinking about fate and if it exist or no. According to my assumption if I take any ...
7
votes
3answers
901 views

How does Bell's theorem rule out the possibility of local hidden variables?

It seems to be common consensus that the world is non-deterministic and this is proved by Bell's theorem. But even though Bell's experiments proved that the theory of quantum mechanics work, How does ...
10
votes
1answer
491 views

What are the 't Hooft papers about classical models underlying QM?

Gerard 't Hooft states on his webpage: I have mathematically sound equations that show how classical models generate quantum mechanics. Also, there are some interesting discussions here on ...
3
votes
1answer
200 views

In QM, does random data “come from anywhere”? Also, what are the properties of the data?

I have only taken a basic quantum mechanics course (this book, so you know where I'm coming from), but I've been wondering about something. If we set up a quantum system in a known state and take a ...
4
votes
4answers
294 views

Are a quantum mechanical system a chaotic (yet deterministic) system?

The title is slightly misleading. I really want to know if the randomness and probabilities observed in quantum mechanics is really just the result of a chaotic (yet deterministic) system. If it is ...
4
votes
0answers
428 views

Is there any simple quantum model by Gerard 't Hooft which can explain the double slit experiment?

This question is directed to Prof. 't Hooft and anybody who is familiar with his papers. It is a reaction to Prof. 't Hooft's question why nobody is excited about his classical models for quantum ...
5
votes
0answers
116 views

Is it possible to reproduce the energy spectrum of quantum chaos using classical cellular automata?

Is it possible to reproduce the energy spectrum of quantum chaos using classical cellular automata? It's hardly impressive to reproduce harmonic oscillators.
56
votes
7answers
8k views

Why do people categorically dismiss some simple quantum models?

Deterministic models. Clarification of the question: The problem with these blogs is that people are inclined to start yelling at each other. (I admit, I got infected and it's difficult not to raise ...
20
votes
1answer
2k views

In 't Hooft beable models, do measurements keep states classical?

This is a questions on 't Hooft's beable models (see here: Discreteness and Determinism in Superstrings?) for quantum mechanics, and the goal is to understand to what extent these succeed in ...
3
votes
3answers
922 views

Can superdeterminism resolve contextuality, entanglement and Shor's algorithm in quantum mechanics?

Superdeterminism is the idea that the apparent freedom for the choice of experimental apparatuses and their settings are nothing but an illusion. Contextuality is the dependence of the properties of a ...
7
votes
1answer
284 views

Cellular automata rules for quantum mechanics

My limited understanding of quantum theory is that a quantum system is completely described by its wave function, which deterministically evolves according to Schrödinger's equation until wave ...
5
votes
3answers
584 views

What is happening over the 15 minutes it takes a neutron to decay?

I've read that free neutrons decay into a proton, electron and neutrino with an average lifespan of about 15 minutes. Is there anything physically different about a neutron that has existed for 14 ...
9
votes
4answers
750 views

Can quantum mechanics really be the same as underlying deterministic theory?

I am perplexed by recent papers by 't Hooft giving an explicit construction for an underlying deterministic theory based on integers that is indistinguishable from quantum mechanics at experimentally ...
25
votes
11answers
6k views

Discreteness and Determinism in Superstrings?

So Gerard 't Hooft has a brand new paper (thanks to Mitchell Porter for making me aware of it) so this is somewhat of a expansion to the question I posed on this site a month or so ago regarding 't ...
18
votes
5answers
4k views

Why do people rule out local hidden variables?

I bet the automatic response to my question would be "Bell's theorem" and of course I am not disputing Bell's proof. I am however uncertain of one of his assumptions. The so called "no conspiracy" ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Can randomness exist?

Considering every cause has an action, how can anything be random? For something to happen, it must have a cause and through that definition it can't be random. Considering this why are many quantum ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

If randomness doesn't exist, how come the universe isn't a perfect sphere with predictable distribution of matter?

I'm presuming that the scientific community pretty much agrees that randomness doesn't exits, and that everything has a cause. Please correct me if I'm wrong, I've heard of quantum mechanics, but as ...
4
votes
1answer
169 views

Event-by-Event Simulation of Quantum Phenomena

I just recently stumbled over http://rugth30.phys.rug.nl/dlm/ and http://www.sbfisica.org.br/bjp/files/v38_26.pdf As the title suggests these are presentations of mathematical models capable of ...