Density is defined as the mass per unit volume of a substance.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

11
votes
5answers
9k views

Why does a black hole have a finite mass?

I mean besides the obvious "it has to have finite mass or it would suck up the universe." A singularity is a dimensionless point in space with infinite density, if I'm not mistaken. If something is ...
13
votes
5answers
25k views

What is exactly the density of a black hole and how can it be calculated?

How do scientists calculate that density? What data do they have to calculate that?
8
votes
2answers
3k views

What would happen to a teaspoon of neutron star material if released on Earth?

I've read on NASA's page on neutron star that one teaspoonful of that star would weigh over 20 billion tonnes on Earth. If it was somehow possible to bring it to earth would it: Burn and disappear ...
9
votes
6answers
7k views

How can super massive black holes have a lower density than water?

I heard on a podcast recently that the supermassive black holes at the centre of some galaxies could have densities less than water, so in theory, they could float on the substance they were gobbling ...
34
votes
2answers
11k views

Before a once-warm lake starts to freeze, must its temperature be 4°C throughout at some point?

This is a problem I just started puzzling over, and I felt this would be a good forum to check my reasoning. So here are the relevant observations followed by my question: Water achieves its maximum ...
34
votes
6answers
33k views

Why is jumping into water from high altitude fatal?

If I jump from an airplane straight positioned upright into the ocean, why is it the same as jumping straight on the ground? Water is a liquid as opposed to the ground, so I would expect that by ...
20
votes
5answers
6k views

Why does sound travel faster in iron than mercury even though mercury has a higher density?

The speed of sound depends on the density of the medium in which it is travelling and increases when the density increases. For example, in solids sound travels faster than in liquid and even faster ...
20
votes
12answers
44k views

Does hot air really rise?

"Heat rises" or "warm air rises" is a widely used phrase (and widely accepted phenomenon). Does hot air really rise? Or is it simply displaced by colder (denser) air pulled down by gravity?
4
votes
3answers
3k views

How can black holes be so dense?

It is said that if the Earth were a black hole, it would be the size of a peanut!? How is this density possible, are atoms really that sparse that they can be compressed so tightly? Is there some ...
37
votes
4answers
6k views

Are black holes very dense matter or empty?

The popular description of black holes, especially outside the academia, is that they are highly dense objects; so dense that even light (as particle or as waves) cannot escape it once it falls inside ...
12
votes
4answers
47k views

Why does ice have a lower density than water?

Can someone explain me why is ice less dense than water? As I know, all solids are usually denser than the liquids (correct me if I am wrong).
11
votes
2answers
4k views

Is ultradense deuterium real?

I've found several articles discussing experimental evidence of a deuterium state of densities over $140 \textrm{ kg}/\textrm{cm}^3$: F. Winterberg. Ultradense Deuterium. arXiv. Shahriar Badiei, ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Does the mass of a star change as it collapses into a black hole?

I know (I think!) that when a really big star collapses on itself it creates a black hole. My question: When a star collapses, is the mass equal to the mass of the star when it's not a black hole? Or ...
8
votes
3answers
7k views

Hydrostatic pressure - doesn't density vary with depth?

Our class is learning about hydrostatic water pressure and we have been told that we can calculate the force of the liquid on an object at any depth using "the density x 9.8 x the depth". However, as ...
5
votes
3answers
11k views

How much lift does the average latex helium filled party balloon produce?

How much lift does the average helium filled party balloon produce? (not including any extras like ribbon string)
1
vote
1answer
722 views

speed of sound relative to density of medium through which sound travels

I know that sound travels faster in water compared to air and say faster in steel than in what're so What would the density have to be to cause sound to approach the speed of light
23
votes
3answers
27k views

Is there a compound denser than the densest element?

I'm musing about how to give students an intuitive feeling about density by letting them lift a same sized volume of different materials, e.g. 1 liter of water, a 10x10x10 cm cube of iron, lead etc. ...
6
votes
3answers
905 views

Is it possible to have a singularity with zero mass?

A singularity, by the definition I know, is a point in space with infinite of a property such as density. Density is Mass/Volume. Since the volume of a singularity is 0, then the density will thus ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the relationship between Maxwell–Boltzmann statistics and the grand canonical ensemble?

In the grand canonical ensemble one derives the expectation value $\langle \hat n_r\rangle^{\pm}$ for fermions and bosons of sort $r$: $$ \langle \hat n_r\rangle^{\pm} \ \propto \ \frac{1}{\mathrm{...
7
votes
3answers
298 views

How wide does a wall of ice need to be to stay in place?

Let us say that we have unlimited manpower to construct a huge wall of water ice e.g. 200 m tall (700 feet). -and that the wall is placed in a climate, where the temperature never (for your purpose) ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Why is it difficult to mix helium and nitrogen gases?

I recently learned an interesting fact: That it's difficult to mix helium and nitrogen gases in a compressed gas cylinder. Gas suppliers that need to mix the two gases have to rotate the cylinders for ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

Are coffee's properties different enough from water's to cause increased spillage while walking?

I recently found this article, which describes how... It just so happens that the human stride has almost exactly the right frequency to drive the natural oscillations of coffee, when the fluid is ...
3
votes
2answers
563 views

Determination of mass density distribution of an object

This is a follow-up to a previous question How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?. My purpose is not to restart the flurry of more or less humorous jokes (which are not such a bad thing ...
2
votes
2answers
243 views

Why won't a block less dense than water fully submerge?

Suppose we have an object of volume $1\: \mathrm{m^3}$. Mass of that object is $500\: \mathrm{kg}$, which means that the density of the object is $500\: \mathrm{kg/m^3}$. If the object is in water it ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

How does the gravitational field behave inside a star?

The interior gravitational field of a star with constant density is given by $ds^{2}=-\left(\frac{P_{c}+\rho_{0}}{P(r)+\rho_{0}}\right)^{2}dt^{2}+\frac{dr^{2}}{1-\frac{8\pi\rho_{0}}{3}r^{2}}+r^{2}d\...
9
votes
2answers
3k views

Do glass panes become thicker at the bottom over time?

Is it true that a glass window, that has been placed in a wall for about 10 years or more, is thicker on the bottom than on the top? I can vaguely remember my physics teacher saying that this was true....
6
votes
3answers
289 views

Hollow gold bar

A scammer got a hollow gold bar and fills it with a combination of lead and air, with the same average density as gold. What's the simplest way of discovering the fraud? I know that x-rays will see ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Why is ice less dense than water?

The answers to this question explain that ice is less dense than water because it has a "crystal structure", but they dont explain what exactly that is and why this happens, also I saw this answer ...
2
votes
1answer
217 views

Is there some special cutoff density after which spacetime “collapses” and forms a black hole?

With crude calculations following densities can be approximated: Given that radius of proton is $1.75×10^{−15} m$ and it's mass is $1.67 × 10^{-27}kg$, this gives density of proton to be $\dfrac {1....
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Why is density an intensive property?

I am still trying to understand what are intensive and extensive properties. Possibly someone can give a pointer to a decent text (preferably on the web), as I am not too happy (to say the least) with ...
1
vote
1answer
795 views

Does the Relative density of water change based on the state it is in

Will Relative density of water change based on the state it is in? Ie solid, liquid, gas. What causes this change(if any) in Rd?
1
vote
0answers
105 views

How much water is needed for Saturn to float in?

Saturn floats because it's density is less than that of water. Just how much water would be needed? Assume a cuboid tank holding it. And when we actually put saturn in that water, how far in the ...
0
votes
3answers
365 views

Center Of Mass Troubles

I understand the concept of Center Of Mass(com), but I am having a difficult time interpreting the equation of the simplified case of one-dimension. The book I am reading defines the position of the ...
0
votes
1answer
318 views

is gravitational force dependent on objects radius?

I was told that objects with the same mass but different sizes (or densities) will have a different gravitational pull. Is this true? If so, why?
0
votes
1answer
251 views

Is there a charge density in quantum mechanics?

Is it meaningful in quantum mechanics to speak of charge distribution? Some people say if you sovle the Schroedinger Equation for the hydrogen atom, the eigenfunctions represent a type of charge ...
0
votes
2answers
590 views

Point masses and infinite densities

Point masses are masses who don't have volume. It is said that they are infinitly dense, but I though division by zero is undefined hence you can't define the density for a point mass because $\rho=m/...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Pressure,Pascals Law [duplicate]

Lets say that i have 2 different types of containers, one cuboidal and another one conical. and lets say both these are massless and fully contain water. **1.**In the cuboidal one the pressure ...
0
votes
2answers
250 views

Definition of a line charge with Dirac delta function [closed]

Is the following statement correct for a line charge distribution $λ(x)$? $$ρ(\mathbf r)=λ(x)δ(y)δ(z)$$ If yes - what does it say?