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3
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1answer
78 views

Do photons have six degrees of freedom?

Calculations involving pressure and volume relationships of photon gas during the cosmologic expansion of the universe posit an adiabatic cooling process with a heat capacity ration of 4/3. This ratio ...
0
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0answers
27 views

Number of independent components of a unitary matrix [migrated]

By definition, a $n$ dimensional unitary matrix $U$ satisfies the condition $U^{\dagger}U=I$, and $UU^{\dagger}=I$. I'd like to ask if these two equations are independent. If so, there will be $n^2$ ...
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0answers
39 views

Finding the configuration space and degrees of freedom of spherical pendulum

Suppose we have a spherical pendulum tethered to the origin in $\mathbb{R}^3$ where the length of the rod is a time varying function $l(t)$. What is the configuration space of this system, and how ...
2
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3answers
54 views

Why do we say linear molecules only have 2 rotational degrees of freedom? Why does the third 'frozen' one not count?

It is possible to excite rotations around the axes perpendicular to the bond of a linear molecule. However, rotation around the axis along the bond of the molecule would require huge energies, due to ...
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2answers
62 views

Do rotational degrees of freedom contribute to temperature?

Recently I have come across a mathematical problem where I was said to calculate the temperature increase of certain mol of N2 gas confined in a room. However, I found that there was only ...
0
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3answers
64 views

Degrees of freedom of a two particle rigid system

We have two particles and the distance between them is fixed, let's suppose we know the coordinates of one particle (2,1) and other particle (x,2). So using distance formula (let's suppose the fixed ...
6
votes
1answer
82 views

7/2 versus 9/2 for diatomic heat capacity

Question I calculated the classical heat capacity of a diatomic gas as $C_V = (9/2)Nk_B$, however the accepted value is $C_V = (7/2)Nk_B$. I assumed the classical Hamiltonian of two identical atoms ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Is the energy per degree of freedom $\frac{1}{2}kT$ in relativistic systems?

The equipartition theorem says that the mean energy per degree of freedom is $\frac{1}{2} kT$. Is this result relativistically correct?
5
votes
2answers
163 views

Extra vibrational mode in linear molecule

When calculating the number of vibrational modes for a molecule, the formulas differ for linear $(n = 3N - 5)$ and non-linear $(n = 3N - 6)$ molecules, where $n$ is number of modes and $N$ is number ...
2
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2answers
60 views

Gibbs phase rule and degrees of freedom at the triple point / triple line

The Gibbs phase rule tells me that at a substance's triple point, where there are 3 phases in equilibrium, there should be 0 degrees of freedom. Based on my understanding, that means there should be 0 ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

Should the (On-shell) (2+1)d $N=2$ Chiral Multiplet Contain Two Scalars and Two Majorana Spinors?

In supermultiplets, the bosonic degrees of freedom and the fermionic degrees of freedom need to match in number. The number of degrees of freedom of a field corresponds to the number of independent ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Degrees of freedom of a point mass sliding on a rigid curved wire without friction

I am very new to the subject and am going through Structure and Interpretation of Classical Mechanics. One exercise asks to find the degrees of freedom of a number of systems, one of which is a ...
2
votes
1answer
89 views

Why does the Dirac equation reduce the fermionic degree of freedom by half

We know that in 4D a Dirac spinor has 4 complex components or 8 real components meaning 8 real off shell degrees of freedom (please correct me if I say something wrong here). When we go on-shell i.e ...
5
votes
2answers
380 views

Why energy at room temperature $= kT$ and not $(3/2)kT$ [duplicate]

I always see that a room temperature of $T=300\,\text{K}$ corresponds to an energy of $k_BT \approx \frac{1}{40}\,\text{eV}$. But shouldn't it be $\frac{3}{2}k_BT$ since the molecules in the air have ...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

Holonomic constraints and degrees of freedom?

Can we see that a constraint can decrease the degrees of freedom of a system if and only if it is holonomic. Either way please can you explain why?
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0answers
56 views

Proving the Virial theorem

Consider the expectation in the canonical ensemble defined by $$\left\langle x_i\frac{\partial \mathcal{H}}{\partial x_j} \right\rangle=\frac{1}{Z}\int d\Gamma x_i\frac{\partial ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Amount of unknown parameters in compressible Euler equations

I'm looking at this page for the compressible Euler equations. To me it seems, in the 1-dimensional case, there should be 3 unknowns: density, velocity, and pressure. This is because the energy $E$ ...
0
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1answer
67 views

Degrees of freedom in double Atwood machine?

Why the degree of freedom in double Atwood machine (one block on one side and a pulley with one block in its each side on other side) is 2 and not 1? According to the formula $s=3*n-m$; where ...
3
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1answer
228 views

Number $g(T)$ of relativistic degrees of freedom as a function of temperature $T$

Let us consider the total number of relativistic degrees of freedom $g(T)$ for particle species in our universe: $$g(T)=\left(\sum_Bg_B\right)+\frac{7}{8}\left(\sum_Fg_F\right)$$ Where the sums are ...
9
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2answers
387 views

Why isn't in counting the no. of degrees of freedom, rotation about the axis running down the length of the molecule counted?

I was reading about the Equipartition Theorem. Then I got the following quotations from my books: A diatomic molecule like oxygen can rotate about two different axes. But rotation about the axis ...
1
vote
2answers
445 views

Definition of generalised coordinates?

I think the definition of generalised coordinates is something along the following lines: A set of parameters that discribe the configuration of a system with respect to some refrence ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Ideal Bullet Block

What if in the experiment by Veritasium Bullet Block Explained, we used an ideal block and bullet, so that the collision is perfect elastic, and the bullet doesn't stick to the block after hitting it? ...
0
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1answer
42 views

Locally accessible dimensions of configuration space

I am reading a book called "Structure and Interpretation of Classical Mechanics" by MIT Press.While discussing configuration space and degrees of freedom,the authors remark the following: Strictly ...
2
votes
2answers
117 views

What's the degree of freedom of this kind of matrix?

We first have a unitary matrix $$\{a_{ij}\}\quad(n\times n)$$ I know how to calculate its degree of freedom, which is $n^2$ if we consider a real variable as one degree of freedom. Now we have a ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Counting d.o.f. and gauge fixing $A_{\mu}$ and $\psi$ in $D$-dimensions

Setup: Let us assume we are in $D$-dimensional Minkowski space-time where $D=d+1$. Consider a free Abelian gauge theory. Then the electromagnetic field will satisfy $$\partial_{\mu}F^{\mu \nu}=0 ...
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1answer
61 views

Polarization in blackbody radiation

While doing some calculation in Statistical Mechanics of blackbody radiation from Huang's Statistical mechanics, I came across with the factor 2 which it says comes from two possible polarizations. ...
3
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0answers
153 views

Quantum vs classical degrees of freedom

It is sometimes stated that any classical underpinnings (rightly non-local) of a general quantum system are unrealistic or unphysical because these require exponentially more information to store what ...
2
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1answer
317 views

Degrees of freedom in Quantum Mechanics

If we look at a particle in classical mechanics, the degrees of freedom increase as its size decreases like the degrees of freedom of an atom is more than that of molecule, and subsequently, the ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Why is molar specific heat at constant volume of a monatomic ideal gas a constant?

I thought specific heat varies depending on the substance. Why is it always $(3/2) R$?
1
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0answers
72 views

Are there diffrent understandings of dimensions?

If people are talking about 4 or higher dimensions they are always pictured as space dimensions. But if you have have a look at the simplest definition of a mathematical dimension it only needs to be ...
3
votes
2answers
287 views

$E=kT$ or $\frac32kT$?

Basically, which is the correct formula for thermal energy, and is this the same as kinetic energy? My notes are pretty conflicting on this topic, and I'm getting pretty confused.
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Explicit Symmetry Breaking: Where do the additional d.o.f. come from?

Massless vector bosons have only two independent degrees of freedom, while massive ones have three. In spontaneous symmetry breaking, the massless vector belonging to the broken group becomes massive ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

What does degrees of freedom mean in the context of vibrations?

If you have an $N$ degrees of freedom system what does this mean? What is the difference between a 1 and a 2 degrees of freedom system?
3
votes
1answer
188 views

Is the ground state of a QFT always a pure state? And excited states are mixed?

I am studying entanglement entropy. It's fullfilled for any local quantum system that the entanglement entropy of a region $A$ in a highly mixed state is extensvie, $$ S_A \sim ...
1
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1answer
77 views

Integrals of Motion for s Degrees of Freedom

From Landau & Lifshitz, Classical Mechanics, the number of integrals of independent integrals of motion for a system of $s$ degrees of freedom is $2s-1$. I am considering a spherical pendulum in ...
2
votes
1answer
202 views

Graviton polarization in higher dimensions

It's not difficult to see that the graviton in $D$ spacetime dimensions has $(D-3)D/2$ polarizations. In $D=4$ there are two $\epsilon^{\pm}_{\mu\nu}$. What I find curious is that in $D=4$ I can ...
2
votes
2answers
104 views

Independent components in a 4-vector representing massless fields

In Ryder Page141, it is written "the electromagnetic field, like any massless field, possesses only two independent components, but is covariantly described by a 4-vector $A_{\mu}$". Why are there ...
0
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1answer
188 views

General relativity: gauge fixing

In his lectures professor Hamber said that the metric tensor is not unique, just like the 4 vector potential is not unique for a unique field in electrodynamics. Since the metric tensor is symmetric, ...
1
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1answer
50 views

Degrees of Freedom for an Asymmetric top

How many degrees of freedom does an asymmetric top have if it is rotating about a fixed point?What are the generalised coordinates used then?
5
votes
2answers
228 views

Questions about the degree of freedom in General Relatity

I'm confused about the number of degrees of freedom in General Relatity. There are two ways to count it. However, they are contradictory. For simplicity, we consider vacuum solution. First, ...
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2answers
399 views

WHY does the “order” of a differential equation = number of “energy storage” elements in a system?

OK. in all engineering courses there comes a point when they introduce you to systems theory and modeling of systems (for eg. via the impulse response) and then the Laplace transform. The modern ...
0
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1answer
72 views

Yang Mills theory and SU(N) groups [duplicate]

Trying to get a better understanding of the relation between a SU(N) Yang Mill theory and its number of "color" space. Most of the description I've found so far are either way to complex/specific. ...
2
votes
2answers
213 views

First-order and second-order wave equations, versus the uncertainty principle

In classical physics, we have second-order equations like Newton's laws, so we need to specify both position (zeroth order) and velocity (first order) of a particle as initial conditions, in order to ...
3
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0answers
65 views

What is the deepest cause of the such high specific heat capacity of water?

Yes, I know about the hydrogen bridges. But I think, it isn't the deepest cause. Anyway, they are only second-order bindings, although quite strong. I think, somehow should have the water a ...
4
votes
2answers
141 views

degree of freedom in 6 dimensional space

Let us assume a cartesian space, where the directions are given by $\hat{i},\hat{j},\hat{k}$. The degree of freedom of a rigid body is $6$. The first three correspond to the position coordinates ...
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2answers
345 views

Counting the number of propagating degrees of freedom in Lorenz Gauge Electrodynamics

How do I definitively show that there are only two propagating degrees of freedom in the Lorenz Gauge $\partial_\mu A^\mu=0$ in classical electrodynamics. I need an clear argument that involves the ...
0
votes
1answer
217 views

How do I find the generalized coordinates in a certain system?

I'm learning about constraints and I know the following: If there are $N$ particles in 3 dimensional space, I have $3N$ degrees of freedom. If I have $n_b$ holonomic constraints and I switch over to ...
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2answers
126 views

How are degrees of freedom and energy related in classical theory?

How are degrees of freedom and energy related in classical theory? How do we come to know that each quadratic degree of freedom classically contributes a factor of $\frac{k_{B}T}{2}$.
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2answers
304 views

How many physical degrees of freedom does the $\mathrm{SU(N)}$ Yang-Mills theory have?

The $\mathrm{U(1)}$ QED case has two physical degrees of freedom, which is easy to understand because the free electromagnetic field must be transverse to the direction of propagation. But what are ...
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0answers
93 views

Local degrees of freedom in QUGRA lead to black holes

I am reading Jan Boer's review of the AdS/CFT correspondence and I quote from end of page 1, where he is talking about equivalence of (d+1)-dim gravity to d-dim field theory “If true, it implies ...