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1answer
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Explicit Symmetry Breaking: Where do the additional d.o.f. come from?

Massless vector bosons have only two independent degrees of freedom, while massive ones have three. In spontaneous symmetry breaking, the massless vector belonging to the broken group becomes massive ...
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1answer
24 views

What does degrees of freedom mean in the context of vibrations?

If you have an $N$ degrees of freedom system what does this mean? What is the difference between a 1 and a 2 degrees of freedom system?
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1answer
122 views

Is the ground state of a QFT always a pure state? And excited states are mixed?

I am studying entanglement entropy. It's fullfilled for any local quantum system that the entanglement entropy of a region $A$ in a highly mixed state is extensvie, $$ S_A \sim ...
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1answer
44 views

Integrals of Motion for s Degrees of Freedom

From Landau & Lifshitz, Classical Mechanics, the number of integrals of independent integrals of motion for a system of $s$ degrees of freedom is $2s-1$. I am considering a spherical pendulum in ...
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1answer
62 views

Graviton polarization in higher dimensions

It's not difficult to see that the graviton in $D$ spacetime dimensions has $(D-3)D/2$ polarizations. In $D=4$ there are two $\epsilon^{\pm}_{\mu\nu}$. What I find curious is that in $D=4$ I can ...
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2answers
72 views

Independent components in a 4-vector representing massless fields

In Ryder Page141, it is written "the electromagnetic field, like any massless field, possesses only two independent components, but is covariantly described by a 4-vector $A_{\mu}$". Why are there ...
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1answer
104 views

General relativity: gauge fixing

In his lectures professor Hamber said that the metric tensor is not unique, just like the 4 vector potential is not unique for a unique field in electrodynamics. Since the metric tensor is symmetric, ...
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1answer
34 views

Degrees of Freedom for an Asymmetric top

How many degrees of freedom does an asymmetric top have if it is rotating about a fixed point?What are the generalised coordinates used then?
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2answers
158 views

Questions about the degree of freedom in General Relatity

I'm confused about the number of degrees of freedom in General Relatity. There are two ways to count it. However, they are contradictory. For simplicity, we consider vacuum solution. First, ...
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2answers
179 views

WHY does the “order” of a differential equation = number of “energy storage” elements in a system?

OK. in all engineering courses there comes a point when they introduce you to systems theory and modeling of systems (for eg. via the impulse response) and then the Laplace transform. The modern ...
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1answer
52 views

Yang Mills theory and SU(N) groups [duplicate]

Trying to get a better understanding of the relation between a SU(N) Yang Mill theory and its number of "color" space. Most of the description I've found so far are either way to complex/specific. ...
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2answers
105 views

First-order and second-order wave equations, versus the uncertainty principle

In classical physics, we have second-order equations like Newton's laws, so we need to specify both position (zeroth order) and velocity (first order) of a particle as initial conditions, in order to ...
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0answers
52 views

What is the deepest cause of the such high specific heat capacity of water?

Yes, I know about the hydrogen bridges. But I think, it isn't the deepest cause. Anyway, they are only second-order bindings, although quite strong. I think, somehow should have the water a ...
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2answers
127 views

degree of freedom in 6 dimensional space

Let us assume a cartesian space, where the directions are given by $\hat{i},\hat{j},\hat{k}$. The degree of freedom of a rigid body is $6$. The first three correspond to the position coordinates ...
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2answers
159 views

Counting the number of propagating degrees of freedom in Lorenz Gauge Electrodynamics

How do I definitively show that there are only two propagating degrees of freedom in the Lorenz Gauge $\partial_\mu A^\mu=0$ in classical electrodynamics. I need an clear argument that involves the ...
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1answer
63 views

How do I find the generalized coordinates in a certain system?

I'm learning about constraints and I know the following: If there are $N$ particles in 3 dimensional space, I have $3N$ degrees of freedom. If I have $n_b$ holonomic constraints and I switch over to ...
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2answers
111 views

How are degrees of freedom and energy related in classical theory?

How are degrees of freedom and energy related in classical theory? How do we come to know that each quadratic degree of freedom classically contributes a factor of $\frac{k_{B}T}{2}$.
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0answers
55 views

Degrees of freedom in physical equations

Say we have the field equation: \begin{equation} f^{\prime}(R)R+3\square f^{\prime}(R)-2f(R)={\kappa}^{2}T, \end{equation} why is the non-vanishing of the second term means that there is an extra ...
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2answers
208 views

How many physical degrees of freedom does the $\mathrm{SU(N)}$ Yang-Mills theory have?

The $\mathrm{U(1)}$ QED case has two physical degrees of freedom, which is easy to understand because the free electromagnetic field must be transverse to the direction of propagation. But what are ...
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0answers
77 views

Local degrees of freedom in QUGRA lead to black holes

I am reading Jan Boer's review of the AdS/CFT correspondence and I quote from end of page 1, where he is talking about equivalence of (d+1)-dim gravity to d-dim field theory “If true, it implies ...
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1answer
113 views

Gauge fixing of an arbitrary field

How to count the number of degrees of freedom of an arbitrary field (vector or tensor)? In other words, what is the mathematical procedure of gauge fixing?
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0answers
147 views

Degrees of freedom of the photon in $d=n$

It is well known that in ordinary $4$ dimension, the photon has on shell only two physical degrees of freedom. Physically this means its elicity is either $\lambda=+1$ or $\lambda=-1$ but cannot ...
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2answers
576 views

Polarization vectors of massive and massless particles

I read from Mandl & Shaw that when quantizing massless vector particles such as photons in Lorentz gauge, there are 4 linearly independent polarization vectors (2 of them being able to "gauged ...
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3answers
234 views

Natural units of information

In physics entropy is usually measured in nats. I wonder is there a possible model of a physical system which has entropy of discrete number of nats? How particles and degrees of freedom should be ...
2
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1answer
206 views

Pauli-Fierz “massive” equation and linearized gravity

It it known that the massive spin-2 irreducible representation of the Poincare group is the traceless symmetrical transverse 4-tensor $h_{\mu \nu}$ with rank 2: $$ (\partial^{2} + m^{2})h_{\mu \nu} = ...
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1answer
189 views

What is “number degrees of freedom for frequency ν”. Frequency is 1D right?

The book QM Demystified states this about black body radiation spectrum: An attempt to explain these results using classical theory was codified in the Rayleigh-Jeans formula, which is an ...
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5answers
778 views

Conservation of Mathematical Constraints when deriving Energy and Momentum from $F=ma$

Background: Starting from $F = ma$, integrating with respect to time, and using basic calc, one can derive $\int Fdt = m (v_f - v_i)$ Starting from $F = ma$, integrating with respect to distance, ...
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2answers
1k views

What are the six degrees of freedom of the atoms in a solid?

A monoatomic ideal gas has heat capacity $C_v=1.5$ which comes from the three translational degrees of freedom. For solids at high temperature, $C_v=3$, implying six degrees of freedom. What are ...
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2answers
263 views

Vanishing of the Ricci tensor in higher spacetime dimensions

I understand how, if the Riemann tensor is 0 in all its components, since we construct the Ricci tensor by contracting the Riemann, Ricci tensor would be 0 in all components as well. I've read that ...
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1answer
603 views

How come a rigid body has 6 degrees of freedoms (DOFs) ? Isn't velocity a DOF?

For rigid body we need to know position of three points and their velocities to determine everything. So that would make 12 DOF. Why do text books say it has six DOFs?
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1answer
182 views

Coulomb gauge and two degrees of freedom of EM field

The EM field has two possible polarizations, which is caused by spin-one nature of field (leads to the Lorenz gauge) and massless of the field. Really, the Klein-Gordon equations for the EM field $$ ...
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1answer
183 views

Virial Theorem and the Energy in a Gas

I clearly am interpreting the Virial Theorem incorrectly, but I don't know how. In dipole gases, the molecules can exhibit five kinetic modes, while they can only experience 2 potential modes. Doesn't ...
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3answers
634 views

Degrees of freedom of the graviton versus classical degrees of freedom

I have a puzzle I can not even understand. A graviton is generally understood in $D$ dimensions as a field with some independent components or degrees of freedom (DOF), from a traceless symmetric ...
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1answer
51 views

Mass, momentum and energy…How many equations for more then one elements? [closed]

Basically, for solving 1D flow equations, one uses the mass, momentum and energy equations (Also known as Euler equations). Say now I have $N$ elements in series, will I be using $3N$ equations?
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2answers
354 views

Uniqueness of the number of degrees of freedom

As per my knowledge, degrees of freedom of any physical system are the number of independent quantities(coordinates) which need to be specified in order to specify the state of a system uniquely. ...
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1answer
637 views

Gauge fixing and degrees of freedom

Today, my friend (@Will) posed a very intriguing question - Consider a complex scalar field theory with a $U(1)$ gauge field $(A_\mu, \phi, \phi^*)$. The idea of gauge freedom is that two solutions ...
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1answer
614 views

Counting degrees of freedom for gravitational waves as a gauge field

Sean Carroll has a new popularization about the Higgs, The Particle at the End of the Universe. Carroll is a relativist, and I enjoyed seeing how he presented the four forces of nature synoptically, ...
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1answer
159 views

How exactly are the degrees of freedom seen by a falling into a black hole observer related to the ones seen by a staying outside observer?

This is some kind of a follow up of this nicely to the point answer to a provocative (but nevertheless upvoted!) question, about the legitimacy of black hole physics. The answer mentions, that the ...
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1answer
213 views

A different proof for 6 degrees of freedom

I want a different proof of 6 degrees of freedom of a solid object made of $\ N$ particles. I am thinking along these lines: Definition of rigid body is $\ modulus[\vec{r_i}-\vec{r_j}]=constant \ ...
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1answer
192 views

Phase Space dimension of Lorenz Strange Attractor

It is often discussed in 3 spatial dimensions and the need for third dimension to prevent self intersection is mentioned. But shouldn't the phase space of the Lorenz system be 6 dimensional, i.e., the ...
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0answers
521 views

what's the difference between linear n-atom molecule and nonlinear n-atom molecule?

I am reading a material about the degree of freedom for linear n-atom molecule and nonlinear n-atom molecule. Here is my analysis for a diatomic molecule, if there are two atoms, we have to use 3 ...
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2answers
4k views

The number of degrees of freedom of a monatomic gas

Suppose that I have a monatomic gas sample consisting of $N$ atoms (e.g., $N$ argon atoms); thus there are no vibrations or rotations. How many degrees of freedom does the system have? Does the ...
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2answers
5k views

Modeling a two-mass, spring, damper system

I'm trying to model a system with two masses, two springs, two dampers, and one applied force using transfer functions. I'll then be inputting it into Simulink. The system looks like this but there ...
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1answer
264 views

Propagating degrees of freedom of graviton

What is the best way to see that the number of propagating degrees of freedom or gravitons in 3 dimensions is $0$ ? By graviton I mean the metric and NOT some topologically massive graviton that one ...
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1answer
306 views

Degrees of freedom in the infinite momentum frame

Lenny Susskind explains in this video at about 40min, as an extended object (for example a relativistic string) is boosted to the infinite momentum frame (sometimes called light cone frame), it has no ...
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2answers
175 views

Dark matter: degrees of freedom

I'm afraid this question could sound a little too vague. I don't even know if dark matter (DM) can be genuinely described by quantum field theory, or if quantum field theory should be somehow ...
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1answer
405 views

Clarification on “central charge equals number of degrees of freedom”

It's often stated that the central charge c of a CFT counts the degrees of freedom: it adds up when stacking different fields, decreases as you integrate out UV dof from one fixed point to another, ...
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2answers
2k views

degree of freedom of a rigid body 5 or 6?

I'm confused here. I have a three particle (rigid) system. What would be the degree of freedom? I found out five. 3 coordinates for center of mass and 2 for describing orientation. But we have only ...
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2answers
631 views

Counting degrees of freedom in presence of constraints

In a $N$ dimensional phase space if I have $M$ 1st class and $S$ 2nd class constraints, then I have $N-2M-S$ degrees of freedom in phase space. How can I calculate the degrees of freedom in ...
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3answers
787 views

Counting degrees of freedom of gauge bosons

Gauge bosons are represented by $A_{\mu}$, where $\mu = 0,1,2,3$. So in general there are 4 degrees of freedom. But in reality, a photon (gauge boson) has two degrees of freedom (two polarization ...