The definition tag is used in situations where the question is either about how some term or concept is define or where the validity of an answer depends on a subtle definition of some term or concept used in the question.

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Should Brillouin zone be a continuous object rather than a discrete one in the thermodynamic limit?

For example, just consider a 1D atom chain with $N$ sites and lattice constant $a=2\pi$, under periodic boundary conditions, the crystal momentum reads as $k=\frac{n}{N}\frac{2\pi}{a}=\frac{n}{N}$, ...
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1answer
1k views

Why is the mechanical advantage of a wedge = length of slope/ width?

Mechanical advantage is defined as Force Output/Force Input For a symmetrical wedge with the length of the slopes being equal and the width being the distance between the end points, the articles ...
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Definitions in thermodynamics: temperature, thermal equilibrium, heat

I'm currently reading Fermi's "Thermodynamics" and I'm trying to grasp the (possibly different) right definitions for temperature, thermal equilibrium, heat. To clarify, I'm looking for definitions ...
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419 views

How is the term “Born level” usually defined?

How is the term "Born level" usually defined, e.g. in talking about the $pp\to Z/\gamma^*\to e^+e^-$ cross section at Born level?
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84 views

Motivation For Definitions [closed]

I noticed in my physics textbook that we define certain relationships to be true. I can see how this is considerably helpful in deriving other relationships from these definitions; for instance, take ...
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1answer
115 views

Two definitions: 'semi-classical space-time' and 'supersymmetric Minkowski space'

By reading articles I ran several times into two terms, never being defined so I assume they must have well established definitions somewhere. The first is semi-classical space-time. If I where to ...
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5answers
378 views

Are events in this experiment simultaneous if observed in platform's frame?

In some contexts e.g. on Wikipedia it is defined as a matter of happening . In others(e.g. as defined by Einstein in his book "Relativity the special and general theory") it is defined as a matter of ...
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2answers
143 views

Definitions of Lagrange points: $L_4$ and $L_5$

We have the the five Lagrange points (let consider Earth and Sun): $L_1$ - lie between Sun and Earth; $L_2$ - beyond the Earth; $L_3$ - beyond the Sun; And what's the difference between $L_4$ and ...
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3answers
107 views

Is my conceptual understanding pertaining to heat & temperature correct?

From what I've understood: Heat is the total sum of kinetic energy translational energy possessed by individual atoms in an object. Temperature is the average kinetic energy translational energy ...
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2answers
86 views

How many psi's are in one bar?

6894.7573 bar = 100000.0 psi according to google 6894.7573 bar = 100000.0001 psi according to wolfram alpha which is it? How many psis are in one ...
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3answers
2k views

Differences between wavefunction, probability and probability density?

I am trying to understand the differences between wavefunction, probability and probability density. There are different definitions on the internet. For example: ...
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2answers
9k views

Definition of electric charge and proper explanation

Is there a definition of electric charge and proper explanation of it? It is said "Electric charge is the physical property of matter that causes it to experience a force when close to other ...
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1answer
81 views

Definition: Coupling [closed]

What does it mean to say that 2 fields are coupled? More generally, what does "coupling" mean?
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1answer
54 views

Is 'grapheme' a substance or a typo?

While reading Ref. 1 I came across the sentence Below we focus on the physics of ideal (single layer) grapheme. I did google search 'grapheme' but the results tended towards a completely ...
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2answers
57 views

Is electric potential a form of potential energy?

As I understand it, the concept of potential energy arises from analytical mechanics. Yet I often see the concept of electric potential $\phi$ introduced without mention of analytical mechanics. For ...
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1answer
58 views

It seems wrong to find the mass using weight alone when using chemical compounds [duplicate]

The difference between mass and weight is pretty straightforward so then how can we WEIGH a substance then ask how many Daltons (atomic MASS units) are in that substance without a conversion in there ...
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1answer
1k views

Distinguish between instantaneous speed and instantaneous velocity

I encountered a line in my text book of physics that: Average speed over a finite interval of time is greater or equal to the magnitude of the average velocity. But instantaneous speed at an ...
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2answers
96 views

Definition of torque for a continuous body

I am working on basic physics definitions. Given a particle at position $r$ (in some coorinate reference system) upon which acts a force $F$, the $torque$ $\tau$ is defined by \begin{equation} ...
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1answer
248 views

Modular invariance of CFT

I am looking at the Cardy formula for entropy in CFT, and in the article 'Kerr/CFT correspondence and its Extensions' there is a sentence: In any unitary and modular invariant CFT, the asymptotic ...
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1answer
3k views

Does a force do work on an object with constant velocity?

I know that a force does no work on an object if the object's displacement is zero, but if an object is moving at a constant velocity $\bar{v}$, and a force $\bar f$ (let's say that $\bar f$ and $\bar ...
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1answer
280 views

What would it take for a physical phenomenon to be telekinetic?

I've just watched an episode by MinutePhysics called "Real World Telekinesis". In it, Neil Turok (I wonder if that is his actual name; I remember playing a game called "Turok: Dinosaur Hunter" on ...
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1answer
187 views

Why the kilogram is not defined? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do we still not have an exact definition for a kilogram? I was thinking about SI units. I found the following definition for the base units: Meter: distance ...
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1answer
644 views

Wave packets v.s. wave trains

Could someone please explain the difference between a wave packet and a wave train? I have rummaged around online but have not been able to find a definitive definition.
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1answer
379 views

Energy versus free-energy diagram

Energy versus free energy diagram. I haven't been able to find an adequate definition of these two terms in relation to each other. Could someone point me in the right direction, please? From Borrell ...
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1answer
27 views

Conventional definition of ideal fluid

According to Landau&Lifshitz, an ideal fluid is one with zero viscosity and a negligible thermal conductivity. This is also the FR.wikipedia version: En mécanique des fluides, un fluide est ...
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1answer
29 views

Is entalphy a presence of energy or a change in energy?

I see that the words enthalpy and change in enthalpy are often used interchangibly. Do they mean the same thing? Are change in enthalpy and enthalpy different? What is the true definition of ...
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2answers
29 views

How do we count beats?

Books say that one beat constitutes two successive maxima of sound intensity with a minima in between. This is confusing me as the definition of beat period says - it is the time interval between two ...
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2answers
75 views

Mathematical misunderstanding of Work-Potential Energy Theorem?

This is a relatively basic question, but I don't understand why it is the case. This is from my dynamics book and is mainly a mathematical misunderstanding. $$ \ dU = F\cos\theta ds $$ Which means ...
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2answers
58 views

What is the difference between the actual distance covered by a projected object and the displacement?

What is the difference between the actual distance covered by a projected object and the displacement? A stone was projected with an angle of projection of 30 and it covered a horizontal distance ...
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1answer
85 views

What is a conservative force?

Currently I have three different pictures to describe/understand conservative forces. For the moment I just want to get an electron from point A to point B. In the near surrounding is another electron ...
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1answer
167 views

Determination of displacement value in work formula

A net force will always create displacement which approaches infinity if left undisturbed. So how to fix a value of displacement in work formula? Isn't a mention time interval necessary? Or do we ...
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1answer
138 views

The formula used to calculate electrical potential energy

Sorry for the ugly picture but it makes my question more understandable. The $\Delta V$ from $A$ to $B$ is calculated by$$\int_A^B E \, \mathrm{d}r$$ where $r$ is the distance between $A$ and $B$. ...
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1answer
2k views

Definition of “intensive” and “extensive” properties

Today I was asked what does it mean for a physical property of a system to be intensive. My first answer, loosely speaking, was: "It is a property that is local." I was specifically thinking ...
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2answers
2k views

How would you determine whether an object is at equilibrium? [closed]

How would you determine whether an object is at equilibrium or not? What is the definition of equilibrium?
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3answers
14k views

Difference b/w Kinetics & Kinematics w/concrete example

(I know whether I understand this or not doesn't matter much to my work & study but am just curious.) I still can't differentiate in my head kinetics and kinematics (similar thread is found but ...
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16 views

Transverse Trace-less quadrupole

In Gravitational radiation, it is convenient to work with "transverse traceless quadrupole tensor". However there are three terms: "quadrupole moments" , "reduced quadrupole moment" and "transverse ...
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0answers
26 views

What's the difference between microscopy and spectroscopy?

Both methods collect particles or electromagnetic waves, and in both methods it's possible to reconstruct a 2D image, which may represent morphology (AFM, LEED for example), electronic structure (STM, ...
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0answers
18 views

What's the difference between “spectromicroscopy” and “microspectroscopy”?

Both definitions that I found are rather vague. (Related question: What's the difference between microscopy and spectroscopy?)
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0answers
29 views

What are the Fermi and Debye temperature constants?

What are the Fermi temperature and Debye temperature constants? We were discussing these in class and I don't fully understand what these constants are or why we have them. Can anyone explain?
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22 views

Definition of “nonlinear” in the context of perturbation of gravity

What exactly is the definition of a nonlinear perturbation when applied to a background spacetime metric? I have seen so called "linear perturbations" which look like $$ds^2 = -(1+2\Phi)dt^2 ...
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1answer
77 views

What is many-body bound state?

Bound state by definition is a state when particles are bounded together, so then "many-body bound state" would be bound state for a system of many bodies. Then I have several puzzles: 1. is the state ...
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35 views

The relationship between the two statistical mechanical definitions of entropy

It seems like similar questions have been asked here; hopefully my question is not a duplicate. I am reading my textbook on the statistical mechanical definitions of entropy, and I am very confused ...
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1answer
55 views

What does it mean by coherence between waves?

I know by definition, coherence is pair of waves that have constant phase difference. What does this mean? Does it mean they are always have a 360 degrees, or 0 degrees phase difference? Or could they ...
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1answer
39 views

Variable definition in wave function for scattering particle?

For the wave function of a scattered particle when finding the scattering aptitude we have: $$\psi(r)=Ae^{ik_0∙r}+\frac{2\mu}{\hbar^2} ∫G(r-r')V(r')\psi(r')d^3r'$$ I was wondering what the variables ...
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0answers
87 views

Streamlines tangent to velocity vector

As from the title, I'm not too sure how they are related. Definition is that streamlines are instantaneously tangential to the velocity vector of the field. Why would a streamline that shows direction ...
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1answer
66 views

Definition of “destructive” interference of waves

What is the commonly accepted precise definition of "destructive" interference of waves. Does it mean: interference with complete cancellation or interference where the amplitude gets smaller ...
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3answers
389 views

Are we crystals?

Can we say that we are crystals because just like crystals we are made up of very small unit (cell) making up almost the same shape (our body) everywhere.
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1answer
1k views

Definition of the complex wavenumber

My syllabus of electromagnetism defines the complex wavenumber as: $$k = \omega\sqrt{\epsilon\mu}$$ with $\epsilon$ the complex permittivity and $\mu$ the complex permeability. Thus $\epsilon$ and ...
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1answer
46 views

Angular displacement after full rotation

I was wondering is why angular displacement isn't $0$ after $n$ full rotations?
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1answer
136 views

Poles, wavefunctions, transmission

Why is it said that $\operatorname{sech}x$ (a transmission amplitude) has a simple pole on the imaginary axis?