The definition tag is used in situations where the question is either about how some term or concept is define or where the validity of an answer depends on a subtle definition of some term or concept used in the question.

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What is actually a conservation law?

Though in his lectures, Feynman didn't define conservation law, he did use it while explaining divergence theorem: [...] heat is conserved. That is, no heat is generated inside the material and ...
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45 views

Definition of non-degenerate metric tensor

We know that a metric has a property which is called non-degeneracy. I was searching for what does that mean and saw it associated with the fact that $det(g_{\mu\nu})\neq0$. How does this relate to ...
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61 views

When momentum coincides with impulse

If an object is pushed for some time by some force from a resting state, can I say that at the exact moment the force is removed, impulse equals momentum?
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2answers
54 views

How this formula for work follows from the definition?

If a particle moves along a path $\gamma : I\subset \mathbb{R}\to \mathbb{R}^3$ then the work done by a force $\mathbf{F}$ is defined by $$W = \int_{\gamma} \mathbf{F} = ...
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224 views

Quantum hadrodynamics

What is quantum hadrodynamics? Can anybody give a proper explanation? What are the standard books and sources of information that can be found on the internet for better understanding?
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2answers
56 views

What are the “generations of matter”?

After a series of clicks on New Scientist and Wikipedia, I ended up on the Wiki article for "generations of matter", and I didn't quite understand it. I believe (and this may be wrong) that different ...
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2answers
36 views

What is the theoretical instantaneous temperature of a gas?

When we measure the temperature of a gas we typically integrate the molecular collisions and wind up with an 'average' temperature due to the sensor comprising a relatively large thermal mass. And ...
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1answer
35 views

Integral limits when calculating the work

If I integrate $$dW= \vec{ F} \cdot d\vec{\ell}$$ which are the limits? In $$\int\limits_{W_{inf}}^{W_{sup}}dW= \int\limits_{\vec{\ell}_{1}}^{\vec{\ell}_{2}} \vec{ F} \cdot d\vec{\ell}$$ it is ...
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1answer
73 views

Transpose of (1,1) tensor

When we transpose a (1,1) tensor, shall we simply switch the two indices while keeping their upper/lower positions or switch them and also switch their upper/lower positions? In general, would the ...
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1answer
30 views

Degrees of freedom in double Atwood machine?

Why the degree of freedom in double Atwood machine (one block on one side and a pulley with one block in its each side on other side) is 2 and not 1? According to the formula $s=3*n-m$; where ...
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1answer
52 views

Difference between Higgs mechanism and Higgs decay

What is the difference between Higgs Mechanism and Higgs decay? I know that Higgs mechanism is a process which provide the mass to gauge boson. In general, many literature explain Higgs mechanism ...
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1answer
65 views

When is an object at rest?

When is an object considered to be at rest?
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61 views

What is the exact difference between diffusion, convection and advection?

I have tried to explore the information but still not very clear on the exact difference between diffusion, convection and advection. Can anyone help me out to clear my concept?
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2answers
97 views

Can we define tension in a string as the reactive force produced in a string being pulled at both ends?

In my textbook, the definition of tension was given that Tension is the reactive force which exists when string is being stretched at its both end. After it there was a case given that to calculate ...
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3answers
117 views

What is a photon? [duplicate]

I'm trying to get a definitive and clear answer to the question of what a photon actually is. Textbooks seem to give quite vague explanations, all starting with Einstein's idea that a quanta is a form ...
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5answers
41 views

Who is said to do Work, me or the body?

If I subject my force to a body and it is displaced then the work is said to be done. What is that work done by? Is it said to be done by me or that body?
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0answers
20 views

Transverse Trace-less quadrupole

In Gravitational radiation, it is convenient to work with "transverse traceless quadrupole tensor". However there are three terms: "quadrupole moments" , "reduced quadrupole moment" and "transverse ...
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1answer
51 views

Conventional definition of ideal fluid

According to Landau&Lifshitz, an ideal fluid is one with zero viscosity and a negligible thermal conductivity. This is also the FR.wikipedia version: En mécanique des fluides, un fluide est ...
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1answer
41 views

What is the difference between the diffusion equation and the heat equation?

I know that the diffusion equation is a more general version of the heat equation. But what is the exact difference informally?
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0answers
36 views

What's the difference between microscopy and spectroscopy?

Both methods collect particles or electromagnetic waves, and in both methods it's possible to reconstruct a 2D image, which may represent morphology (AFM, LEED for example), electronic structure (STM, ...
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3answers
78 views

Definition of a normal mode?

What is the formal definition of a normal mode for a string? And how does this relate to the definition from e.g. wiki that seem to be applied to discrete systmes of particles only? Also on a string ...
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0answers
24 views

What's the difference between “spectromicroscopy” and “microspectroscopy”?

Both definitions that I found are rather vague. (Related question: What's the difference between microscopy and spectroscopy?)
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1answer
65 views

What is thermodynamic equilibrium?

The state of thermodynamic equilibrium is typically defined referring to the system's behaviour in the future. Can the definition be formulated in terms of measurable quantities?
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3answers
110 views

What is basically the difference between static pressure and dynamic pressure?

What is basically the difference between static pressure and dynamic pressure? While studying Bernoulli's theorem, I came before these terms. The law says: When the fluid flows through a small ...
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2answers
132 views

Extensive variables in thermodynamics

Extensive variables in thermodynamics are those which scale linearly with the system size. It is known that a ratio of two extensive variables is an intensive variable. Now, the number of particles ...
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3answers
84 views

Bounded operator - definition?

As mentioned also in Bounded and Unbounded Operator, an operator $A$ is said to be bounded, if $$\|Af\|\leq k \|f\|,$$ where the constant $k$ does not depend on the choice of $f$ (let us consider a ...
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0answers
32 views

What are the Fermi and Debye temperature constants?

What are the Fermi temperature and Debye temperature constants? We were discussing these in class and I don't fully understand what these constants are or why we have them. Can anyone explain?
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2answers
38 views

Cosmology: what is a quantity that is called “$h$” in regard to angular size of a galaxy?

I am trying to solve a Cosmology problem, but a certain quantity $h$ appears in it, of which I do not know the definition (I have never seen it mentioned anywhere before). So I thought maybe someone ...
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1answer
31 views

Is entalphy a presence of energy or a change in energy?

I see that the words enthalpy and change in enthalpy are often used interchangibly. Do they mean the same thing? Are change in enthalpy and enthalpy different? What is the true definition of ...
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0answers
23 views

Definition of “nonlinear” in the context of perturbation of gravity

What exactly is the definition of a nonlinear perturbation when applied to a background spacetime metric? I have seen so called "linear perturbations" which look like $$ds^2 = -(1+2\Phi)dt^2 ...
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3answers
119 views

Is my conceptual understanding pertaining to heat & temperature correct?

From what I've understood: Heat is the total sum of kinetic energy translational energy possessed by individual atoms in an object. Temperature is the average kinetic energy translational energy ...
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1answer
53 views

How can we define the energy stored in a (conservative) force field?

I have come to know from my textbook that energy is stored in the E-field of a capacitor, in the B-field of an inductor and so on. Take the example of an inductor. The derivation bewilders me ...
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0answers
51 views

What is the difference between the groups $PSU(N)$ and $SU(N)$? [closed]

What is the difference between the groups $PSU(N)$ and $SU(N)$? For example how is $PSU(2,2|4)$ different than $SU(2,2|4)$?
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2answers
71 views

Definition of Duality (opposed to Symmetry)

I'm learning basic string theory right now and we came across T-duality which was presented as a symmetry of the formula for the mass of a string in the context of compactification. There was a remark ...
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1answer
51 views

What is an “equation of motion” as used in context of geodesic equation?

I am studying general relativity and using the book Gravity by James Hartle. On page 170, he provides the following table: I don't understand what he means by "equation of motion" nor do I ...
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4answers
775 views

Is Minkowski space usually a vector space or an affine space?

When I visited Wikipedia's page on Minkowski space, it seemed to offer two definitions. The first defined Minkowski space a vector space. Then, in a later section, it says The section above ...
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1answer
56 views

Is 'grapheme' a substance or a typo?

While reading Ref. 1 I came across the sentence Below we focus on the physics of ideal (single layer) grapheme. I did google search 'grapheme' but the results tended towards a completely ...
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468 views

Hilbert space vs. Projective Hilbert space

Hilbert space and rays: In a very general sense, we say that quantum states of a quantum mechanical system correspond to rays in the Hilbert space $\mathcal{H}$, such that for any $c∈ℂ$ the state ...
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0answers
42 views

Are there universally accepted definitions for physics concepts? [closed]

Is there a list of definitions that have been agreed on by physicists so that everyone's understanding of a term is approximately the same? I have been reading some basic books and they usually give ...
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2answers
122 views

Potential energy $= mgh$, what is $h$?

NOTE: when I say potential energy I mean gravitational PE The formula for potential energy is P.E = mgh. What is h referring to? Height, obviously. Consider the example: What is the potential ...
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1answer
84 views

Definition of Entropy for reversible and irreversible process

$\int \dfrac{\delta Q}{T}$ can't be used to calculate entropy of an irreversible process. If you happen to know heat supplied and temperature at which it is supplied for just an instant. Can you then ...
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63 views

Is electric potential a form of potential energy?

As I understand it, the concept of potential energy arises from analytical mechanics. Yet I often see the concept of electric potential $\phi$ introduced without mention of analytical mechanics. For ...
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5answers
240 views

The elusive difference between force and impulse

Impulse is defined as the product of a force $F$ acting for a (short) time $t$, $J = F*t$, and that is very clear. What I find difficult to understand is how a force can exist that doesn't act for a ...
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2answers
231 views

Understanding relationship between work and energy

I've read over 10 books about work and energy, and I just simply can't understand it. First of all, they go ahead and randomly define that work is force times distance: $$W=F X \cos\theta$$ Okay, ...
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33 views

How do we count beats?

Books say that one beat constitutes two successive maxima of sound intensity with a minima in between. This is confusing me as the definition of beat period says - it is the time interval between two ...
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4answers
204 views

Why is moment of inertia dependent on $r^2$ and not on $r$ ? (physical reason)

Moment of inertia is the mass equivalent in rotational dynamics. I know , by mathematical arguments, moment of inertia of a particle is $$ I = \text{mass} \cdot r^2$$ . But what is the physical ...
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1answer
48 views

Strange definition of a two-level system by the Bloch vector

A two-level system can be described by a density operator involving the Bloch vector $$ \vec{r}; \quad r_x = Tr(\rho X); \quad r_y = Tr(\rho Y); \quad r_z = Tr(\rho Z) $$ as $$ \rho = \frac{I + ...
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2answers
80 views

Mathematical misunderstanding of Work-Potential Energy Theorem?

This is a relatively basic question, but I don't understand why it is the case. This is from my dynamics book and is mainly a mathematical misunderstanding. $$ \ dU = F\cos\theta ds $$ Which means ...
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2answers
275 views

Definition of the quality $(Q)$ factor?

According to Wikipedia, the Q factor is defined as: $$Q=2\pi\frac{\mathrm{energy \, \, stored}}{\mathrm{energy \, \,dissipated \, \, per \, \, cycle}}$$ Here are my questions: Does the energy ...
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1answer
61 views

Defintion of temperature without thermal equilibrium condition

Is temperature only defined in thermal equilibrium? Then how can we explain heat flow by temperature differences?