The definition tag is used in situations where the question is either about how some term or concept is define or where the validity of an answer depends on a subtle definition of some term or concept used in the question.

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35 views

What is “forward peaking”?

In "Research and Development for a Gadolinium Doped Water Cherenkov Detector" the phrase "forward peaking" is used to describe a signal. This comes up in lots of other contexts too, but I still can't ...
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1answer
24 views

How to implement the form of current density in a Hall Effect related calculation?

Please consider the following; Question. A rectangular plate of semiconducting material has dimensions 10mm x 4mm x 1mm. A current of 3 mA flows along the length and a Hall Voltage of 13.6 mV is ...
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1answer
33 views

What exactly is a one particle density?

In Density Functional Theory (DFT) we derive the Grand Potential as a functional of a so-called one particle density (OPD). I have trouble imagining what exactly that is. Could someone help me with ...
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2answers
96 views

What is a Null Geodesic? [duplicate]

What is a Null Geodesic? My textbook only explains it as the Minkowski metric which equals to zero, but I'd appreciate a more detailed explanation.
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2answers
71 views

Can pressure be negative? [duplicate]

From Wiki and from physics fundamentals lections I received info that pressure is scalar value. But in definition you have relation between projections of two vector values to normal axe-force and ...
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3answers
38 views

The standard definition of current

The book says current is the rate of flow of charge per unit time, but I don't understand whether it is rate of flow of charge through a single cross-sectional area per unit time or the entire amount ...
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3answers
76 views

Gravitational acceleration

'What is difference between free fall acceleration g and gravitational acceleration a?***a is with subscript g.In my textbook it is written that "free fall acceleration = gravitational acceleration - ...
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1answer
49 views

What exactly is conservative vector field?

I'm studying calculus, but since the example involved a physical concept. I will ask here: This is how it goes: This means that in a conservative force field, the amount of work required to ...
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1answer
63 views

How are these two Riemann tensor equations equivalent?

Poisson in A Relativist's Toolkit defines the Riemann tensor as$$A_{\,;\alpha\beta}^{\mu}-A_{\,;\beta\alpha}^{\mu}=-R_{\phantom{\mu}\nu\alpha\beta}^{\mu}A^{\nu}.$$ Foster and Nightingale's A Short ...
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2answers
94 views

Why can't we precisely define physics? [closed]

While reading a textbook, I came across this statement: "A precise definition of physics is neither possible nor necessary." I was curious why it is not possible but the textbook never ...
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1answer
26 views

What is the definition of 'relative population' in context of partition function?

In statistical mechanics, what is the definition (or mathematical definition) when authors refer to relative population in the case of a classical particle system?
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2answers
48 views

A car is moving in a circular trajectory with radius R=20m. The equation of motion is : x(t) = 15 + 8t – t^2 [closed]

We have to find the distance the car has traveled after 3s. Actually this question came up in an important exam, and the answer was: L=x(3)-x(0) But I think this is the answer for displacement, ...
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1answer
79 views

The definition of mutual capacitance

I am not sure I completely understand the definition of mutual capacitance. Let's say we have two conductors, $A$ and $B$, so that the following holds: Both conductors are isolated. $A$ is isolated ...
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2answers
114 views

What are global and local gauge invariance defined as they are?

I'm sorry for the triviality of my questions. Why is $\bar{\psi} = e^{i \theta}\bar{\psi}$, where $\theta$ is a real number, used as the global gauge transformation? Why $e^{i \theta}$; what's the ...
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2answers
66 views

Need help on electric potential definition

I'm having trouble understanding electric potential. In my book it says "an electric force acts on a charge situated in an electric field." I understand this part. Then it goes on to say "If a charge ...
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2answers
89 views

Good layman definition of the critical point(phases) and supercriticality

I've heard of this point among others, but never really got what it meant. Wikipedia makes one's head spin. The only thing I picked up is that it occurs between liquid and gas, and displays ...
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2answers
734 views

Inertia Vs Momentum

At my recent lesson on kinematics, my teacher taught about inertia and momentum. This is what she said. Inertia: a characteristic of an object that resists changes to its state of motion. Momentum: ...
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1answer
35 views

How can I physically demonstrate potential difference in a circuit to a 14 year old?

Children of this age have a fair idea about current, resistance, and batteries. Potential difference is a thing that cannot be felt or physically visualized. A teenager asked me if he can touch ...
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6answers
140 views

Why do we use capacitors when batteries can very well store charges?

Can batteries be used instead of capacitors? I am trying to figure out a basic, superficial and any obvious difference between the two.
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1answer
57 views

Hermitian Adjoint of Spinor

Say we have a four component spinor $\psi$: $$ \psi=\begin{pmatrix}\psi_L\\\psi_R\end{pmatrix} $$ Is the Hermitian adjoint of this: $$ \psi^\dagger =\begin{pmatrix}\psi_L^\dagger ...
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2answers
134 views

Susceptibilities and response functions

It is often confusing whether a susceptibility is the same as a response function, specially that often they are used interchangeably, in the context of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Very ...
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0answers
66 views

How is Infinitesimal coordinate transformation related to Lie derivatives?

I am reading the book "Gravitaion and Cosmology" by S. Weinberg. In section 10.9, while discussing Lie derivatives of tensors of different ranks, he makes a general comment: The effect of an ...
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0answers
13 views

Reference for the Definition of Magnetic Properties [duplicate]

I am writing a report on a piece of software I have made as part of my final year assessments. The software models the flux density of arbitrary arrangements of permanent magnets. The readers of my ...
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0answers
24 views

What are non-local charges?

In integrable systems, for example in the XXX spin chain, one encounters non-local charges (that form a Yangian). They are fine since the Yangian generate an infinite number of them, which gives us ...
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3answers
216 views

Can we rigorously define force?

I'm looking to get rigorous definitions on which to base the important quantities in classical mechanics. To me a "rigorous" physical definition is an operational definition -- that is one in which ...
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3answers
237 views

What is actually a conservation law?

Though in his lectures, Feynman didn't define conservation law, he did use it while explaining divergence theorem: [...] heat is conserved. That is, no heat is generated inside the material and ...
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3answers
107 views

Definition of non-degenerate metric tensor

We know that a metric has a property which is called non-degeneracy. I was searching for what does that mean and saw it associated with the fact that $det(g_{\mu\nu})\neq0$. How does this relate to ...
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2answers
68 views

When momentum coincides with impulse

If an object is pushed for some time by some force from a resting state, can I say that at the exact moment the force is removed, impulse equals momentum?
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2answers
71 views

How this formula for work follows from the definition?

If a particle moves along a path $\gamma : I\subset \mathbb{R}\to \mathbb{R}^3$ then the work done by a force $\mathbf{F}$ is defined by $$W = \int_{\gamma} \mathbf{F} = ...
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2answers
250 views

Quantum hadrodynamics

What is quantum hadrodynamics? Can anybody give a proper explanation? What are the standard books and sources of information that can be found on the internet for better understanding?
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2answers
62 views

What are the “generations of matter”?

After a series of clicks on New Scientist and Wikipedia, I ended up on the Wiki article for "generations of matter", and I didn't quite understand it. I believe (and this may be wrong) that different ...
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2answers
59 views

What is the theoretical instantaneous temperature of a gas?

When we measure the temperature of a gas we typically integrate the molecular collisions and wind up with an 'average' temperature due to the sensor comprising a relatively large thermal mass. And ...
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1answer
39 views

Integral limits when calculating the work

If I integrate $$dW= \vec{ F} \cdot d\vec{\ell}$$ which are the limits? In $$\int\limits_{W_{inf}}^{W_{sup}}dW= \int\limits_{\vec{\ell}_{1}}^{\vec{\ell}_{2}} \vec{ F} \cdot d\vec{\ell}$$ it is ...
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1answer
83 views

Transpose of (1,1) tensor

When we transpose a (1,1) tensor, shall we simply switch the two indices while keeping their upper/lower positions or switch them and also switch their upper/lower positions? In general, would the ...
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1answer
51 views

Degrees of freedom in double Atwood machine?

Why the degree of freedom in double Atwood machine (one block on one side and a pulley with one block in its each side on other side) is 2 and not 1? According to the formula $s=3*n-m$; where ...
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1answer
60 views

Difference between Higgs mechanism and Higgs decay

What is the difference between Higgs Mechanism and Higgs decay? I know that Higgs mechanism is a process which provide the mass to gauge boson. In general, many literature explain Higgs mechanism ...
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1answer
95 views

When is an object at rest?

When is an object considered to be at rest?
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3answers
813 views

What is the exact difference between diffusion, convection and advection?

I have tried to explore the information but still not very clear on the exact difference between diffusion, convection and advection. Can anyone help me out to clear my concept?
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2answers
221 views

Can we define tension in a string as the reactive force produced in a string being pulled at both ends?

In my textbook, the definition of tension was given that Tension is the reactive force which exists when string is being stretched at its both end. After it there was a case given that to calculate ...
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3answers
148 views

What is a photon? [duplicate]

I'm trying to get a definitive and clear answer to the question of what a photon actually is. Textbooks seem to give quite vague explanations, all starting with Einstein's idea that a quanta is a form ...
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4answers
52 views

Who is said to do Work, me or the body?

If I subject my force to a body and it is displaced then the work is said to be done. What is that work done by? Is it said to be done by me or that body?
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0answers
45 views

Transverse Trace-less quadrupole

In Gravitational radiation, it is convenient to work with "transverse traceless quadrupole tensor". However there are three terms: "quadrupole moments" , "reduced quadrupole moment" and "transverse ...
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1answer
169 views

Conventional definition of ideal fluid

According to Landau&Lifshitz, an ideal fluid is one with zero viscosity and a negligible thermal conductivity. This is also the FR.wikipedia version: En mécanique des fluides, un fluide est ...
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1answer
73 views

What is the difference between the diffusion equation and the heat equation?

I know that the diffusion equation is a more general version of the heat equation. But what is the exact difference informally?
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0answers
122 views

What's the difference between microscopy and spectroscopy?

Both methods collect particles or electromagnetic waves, and in both methods it's possible to reconstruct a 2D image, which may represent morphology (AFM, LEED for example), electronic structure (STM, ...
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3answers
183 views

Definition of a normal mode?

What is the formal definition of a normal mode for a string? And how does this relate to the definition from e.g. wiki that seem to be applied to discrete systmes of particles only? Also on a string ...
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0answers
55 views

What's the difference between “spectromicroscopy” and “microspectroscopy”?

Both definitions that I found are rather vague. (Related question: What's the difference between microscopy and spectroscopy?)
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1answer
85 views

What is thermodynamic equilibrium?

The state of thermodynamic equilibrium is typically defined referring to the system's behaviour in the future. Can the definition be formulated in terms of measurable quantities?
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3answers
1k views

What is basically the difference between static pressure and dynamic pressure?

What is basically the difference between static pressure and dynamic pressure? While studying Bernoulli's theorem, I came before these terms. The law says: When the fluid flows through a small ...
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2answers
244 views

Extensive variables in thermodynamics

Extensive variables in thermodynamics are those which scale linearly with the system size. It is known that a ratio of two extensive variables is an intensive variable. Now, the number of particles ...