A measure of the rate at which electric charge is transported (especially through a circuit), it has units of charge/time.

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145 views

How does the equation $1/I = r/E +R/E$ relate to $ y=mx+c$? [duplicate]

I have a graph of $1/$current against resistance, which is a straight line of positive gradient. I know that the gradient represents $1/V$ but I can't work out how the equation $1/I= r/E + R/E$ ...
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2answers
37 views

Why does potential drop exist?

I'm sorry that the question is likely to sound stupid but I just can't seem to be able to wrap my head around it. I think I am a bit comfortable with the mathematical idea of it but I still can't ...
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2answers
873 views

What does the gradient of a graph of 1/current against resistance graph represent?

I did an experiment to investigate how current varied with changing resistance and plotted my results on a graph of 1/current against resistance.The graph is a straight line showing $1/I$ to be ...
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3answers
2k views

Why the bulb glows brighter?

If the total current is divided into the branches in a parallel configuration and it is constant in series. How come the bulbs glow brighter when connected in parallel than when connected in series?
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1answer
197 views

Getting Deep into Drift Velocity

We know for a metallic conductor Current $\frac{I}{enA} = v$ where $v$ is drift velocity , $e$ is the charge of an electron, $n$ is no of electrons per unit volume and $A$ is area of cross section. ...
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211 views

Do the integral forms of Maxwell's Equations have limited applicability because of retardation?

In the usual bookwork treatment, it is easy to show that the differential and integral forms of Maxwell's equations are equivalent using Gauss's and Stokes's theorems. I have always thought that ...
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1answer
29 views

What does an induced emf do to a loop of varying current?

I know that the magnetic flux through a loop in space is proportional to the current such that $\Phi=LI$. Therefore a change in magnetic flux will produce an emf, so $\mathscr{E}=-L\dfrac{dI}{dt}$. ...
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2answers
61 views

Does the speed of electrons depend on energy?

I would like to know whether the speed of an electron depends on energy. If yes then in a circuit when electrons flow out of a resistor the energy decreases by a considerable amount, leading to the ...
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0answers
35 views

Free charge density and current in an ohmic material

I have come across what seems a paradox -or at least an exotic conclusion- regarding current conduction in an ohmic material. It is well known that free charge density can only be zero on an ohmic ...
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5answers
312 views

Field inside a wire?

This answer gives a great explanation of why the field inside a wire connected to a battery must be equal at all points: Why doesn't the electric field inside a wire in a circuit fall off with ...
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4answers
119 views

Faraday's Law - recursive?

So we know that the EMF is induced by change of flux. The thing that was always confusing me is the following: we start changing the magnetic field which in turn induces electric field which makes ...
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2answers
57 views

Why can't I connection the anode of a battery to the cathode of an other battery and get a current flowing?

If I touch the anode of a battery or connect the anode the the cathode of an other battery, none (or rather: a very small current) flows between those two. If I instead connect the connect the anode ...
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1answer
233 views

How does current work

In all diagrams i have ever seen of circuits it's implied that electrons travel through load/bulb and bulb makes light/heat. Now there is a problem here...because of this implied logic i assumed more ...
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1answer
40 views

Probability flux: spatial variation of the phase equal to momentum?

We can write any wave function as $$\psi(\vec x, t) = \sqrt{\rho(\vec x,t)}\exp{\left[\frac{iS(\vec x,t)}{\hbar}\right]}$$ for $S$ real and $\rho >0$. Here we interpret $\rho$ as the probability ...
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4answers
5k views

North and south of magnetic field

The current I is flowing upward in the wire in this figure. The direction of the magnetic filed due to the current can be determined by the right hand rule. Can we determine the north and the south ...
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3answers
7k views

Capacitor circuits with light bulb

Let's say we have a normal circuit with a light bulb, with wires and a battery. When one places a capacitor in this circuit, how is the light bulb able to light up, even when the capacitor prevents ...
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0answers
18 views

Flow of alternating current in an ac circuit [duplicate]

I know that it the frequency of an alternating current is 50Hz.It changes its polarity 50 times. So in a circuit does the polarity gets changed these many times. It seems that it is well applicable in ...
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0answers
14 views

Current flow in a polarized capcitor

What is a polarized capacitor? I have learned that in a polarized capacitor, the negative lead must be connected to the negative terminal of the battery and so the positive. But my doubt is that if ...
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2answers
42 views

Finding current density?

I found (from here) that current density can be found with the formula: $$\vec j= \frac{dI}{ds} \vec a$$ where $s$ is the cross sectional area centred on the point we are considering and with a ...
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1answer
115 views

How does back-emf oppose the input-current?

A circuit, has current $A$ flowing at a certain $V$. When there is a change in magnetic-flux, based on Faraday's law of induction & Lenz's law, we know that there is change in Potential ...
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11 views

Magnetic field generated by wires with magnetic cores

Describe the magnetic field generated by alternating current as it passes through a wire's special core of tiny, metal-coated, cylindrical rare earth magnets? Examples of real-world consequences of ...
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1answer
317 views

What proved Conventional sense wrong?

What fact proved for the first time that the conventional sense of current was wrong? And when it did happen? As a corollary of this question, why do we say that electrons have negative charge? Is it ...
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0answers
14 views

What causes a larger (longer) electrical arc when using a tesla coil

So, I really don't know much about this subject, if any at all, but I'd like to do a project on it. I've done some testing with my tesla coil and there appears to be a trend such that a larger ...
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3answers
142 views

Faraday's law in a ring

What role does the induced emf in Faraday's law play in generating current in a ring in which the magnetic flux is changing ?
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2answers
81 views

Force on a loop with induced current

Consider an infinitely long ideal solenoid with current $I$, radius $a$, turns per unit length $n$. Put a closed conducting loop around it (radius $b > a$), on a common axis through their centers. ...
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4answers
87 views

Where does the energy of the electric cable come from?

I'm stuck on one really simple example, I can't figure out what's happening to energy here... (This is not homework) Let's consider an uncharged electric cable, we'll model it by an infinite ...
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1answer
41 views

Relationship Between Conductivity and Lossiness of a material

I read that a material is loss-less if the conductivity is zero. I have always learned that conductivity is a measure of how easily the material can conduct a current. Does this then mean that the ...
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2answers
220 views

Does a simple copper wire with an AC current create EM waves?

I want to know if a household AC current flowing through a simple copper wire will radiate EM waves? If yes, up to what range and can they be called radio waves?
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2answers
61 views

Optimal method for solving circuit

This problem seems quite simple, and I can easily find a way to solve it but the possibility of error in my method is extremely high. This is just a sub-task of a bigger task but this is the only part ...
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3answers
46 views

Electric warning signs question

I've always wandered why do the warning signs show the voltage, not the current. I mean, it's the current that kills you.
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2answers
168 views

Speed of electrons in resistors

What affects the speed of electrons in a resistor? If two resistors are connected in series, they both have the same current; same number of electrons passing at a point per second. Suppose one ...
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5answers
11k views

Why is current a scalar quantity?

Current has both magnitude and direction. As per the definition of vector defined in encyclopedia, current should be a vector quantity. But, we know that current is a scalar quantity. What is the ...
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1answer
3k views

Which derivation of drift velocity is correct?

In the derivation of drift velocity I have seen two variations and want to know which one's correct. $s=ut+\frac{at^2}{2}$ Assume that the drift velocity of any electron in any conductor is : ...
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1answer
73 views

Magnetic Wire Doesn't conduct Electricity

I recently bought a 22 and 30 gauge loop of magnetic wire from radio-shack. The loops of wire were colored differently (if this makes any difference) and on the package it noted how these wires were ...
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1answer
60 views

Spherical Magnet Inside a Solenoid

When passing a bar magnet through a long solenoid why is it that the induced emf when the magnet is in the middle of the solenoid is zero? And if a spherical magnet is put inside the solenoid, will ...
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2answers
115 views

How does a magnetic field “push” charges?

I was under the assumption that a magnetic field acts similar to that of the normal force in mechanics; both affect the path of the object, but do no work. So now suppose that we have a rectangular ...
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4answers
159 views
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2answers
206 views

Combination of cells

There are m*n identical cells of emf E and internal resistance r connected in parallel rows. This combination of cells is connected across an external resistance R. For what arrangement of the ...
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3answers
133 views

(Capacitance of a battery?) Finding the charge accumulated on a rod

We all know the expression for the potential difference across a conducting rod moving through a region with a uniform magnetic field: $\epsilon = B l v$ Now my question is different. Is it ...
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1answer
46 views

Relation between Power, Voltage and Current when one or more of them is amplified?

Power(P) = Voltage(V) * Current(I) If voltage or current is amplified or multiplied what happens to power and current. Does this affect in increase or decrease in power and current values or does ...
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3answers
204 views

Defining Reference Directions for Voltage and Power (sign convention)

My professor decided to use the above reference directions when calculating power in circuits. He says that when power > 0, power is consumed. When p < 0, power is generated. This definition is ...
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2answers
1k views

Why does vaccum have a nonzero characteristic impedance towards electromagnetic radiation

OK, so the characteristic impedance is calculated "as square root of the ratio of the permeability of free space (µ o ) in henrys per meter ( H/m ) to the permittivity of free space ( o ) in farads ...
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3answers
5k views

Why does the current stay the same in a circuit?

I was informed that in a circuit, the current will stay the same, and this is why the lightbulbs will light up (because in order for the current to stay the same, the drift speed of the electrons need ...
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2answers
59 views

Ampere's law of circular path when “bulging” out

The picture shows a use of Ampere's law. A circular path is chosen. $$\oint \vec B \bullet \mathrm{d}\vec l=\mu_0 I_{encl}$$ When using Ampere's law we are talking about the current enclosed. That ...
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1answer
52 views

Does current flow if the current density $J=\sigma f=0$?

A current density $J$ is proportional to the force per unit charge and is of the form $J=\sigma f$. In cases of a conductor where $\sigma=\infty$ and hence $f=0$, is it that current is moving so ...
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2answers
57 views

Is charge 'localization' implicit in the idea of current?

If it was possible for charge to assume arbitrary densities, like we often see electrostatic exercises, and one could spread charge density uniformly over a ring, then how one would, theoretically, ...
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3answers
198 views

Why is emf equal to PD when circuit is “open”?

I understand that the set up of a battery consists of very good, but not ideal conductor, and therefore, some internal resistance exists. Also, I get that emf is the PD that would exist if the ...
3
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1answer
91 views

Why are charging times so long for Lithium-ion batteries?

Why do rechargeable batteries (e.g., mobile phone batteries) need sometimes several hours to be fully charged? In other words, what are the physical constraints that don't allow me to charge my iPhone ...
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0answers
20 views

Time domain reflectometry (TDR) used on conductive “block”, not wire

What would happen if you tried to use time domain reflectometry (TDR) on a conductive block, opposed to a wire? Using electrodes or something. If you could describe the physical behavior of the ...
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4answers
206 views

What is Conductance?

What is conductance? I am being said that conductance is inverse of resistance?I do know that resistance is the opposition to the flow of current but do not get conductance? I do know that:it is ...